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South Korea to test pilots in English language

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South Korea to test pilots in English language

Old 4th Jul 2006, 16:45
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South Korea to test pilots in English language

http://www.flightglobal.com/Articles...+language.html
TRAINING LEITHEN FRANCIS / SINGAPORE
South Korea to test pilots in English language
South Korea's Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) will decide this month which company or companies will be responsible for testing South Korean pilots for English language proficiency so the country can meet its obligations to the International Civil Aviation Organisation.
CASA has been considering three undisclosed Korean companies says Lee Gun-young of CASA's personnel licensing division. Lee adds that CASA is likely to appoint more than one company.
The English language proficiency tests are required to fulfil a new ICAO requirement coming into effect in March 2008 that stipulates pilots must be capable of speaking "level 4" English.
ICAO has classified six levels of English, with "level 1" being minimal English and "level 6" being that of a fluent native speaker.
CASA wants to start testing pilots for "level 4" English before March 2008. Those that fail to make the grade may still be allowed to operate aircraft on international routes, although they will be expected to undertake further English language studies to achieve "level 4".
Pilots that fail to achieve "level 4" English when the deadline kicks in will no longer be permitted to operate aircraft on international routes and will be restricted to domestic routes, says Lee.
Flight International 4-10 July 2006
PE

Last edited by planeenglish; 4th Jul 2006 at 23:31. Reason: To take out name of commercial entity
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Old 5th Jul 2006, 01:28
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Not before time but how many oyther nations will follow South Korea? Lord knows - English lessons are sure needed by so many, but before anyone jumps on me, I say this with all due deference to our non-English speaking colleagues. Let's face it, many native English speakers could do with a lesson or three, particularly their diction.
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Old 5th Jul 2006, 01:49
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The UK CAA already have procedures under way.

All candidates for a Radio Telephony Operators Licence are evaluated and graded on a Level 6, yes or no, basis.

There is more - but it's not my place to say (at least, not yet) - but ICAO are taking this seriously.
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Old 5th Jul 2006, 04:02
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Efforts to test for English fluency in the U.S. are inevitably met with cries of racism.

However, Geno's business in PHL has tripled:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/5127134.stm

I'll be the first to agree that the dialect of English spoken in South Philly may not be intelligible elsewhere...
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Old 5th Jul 2006, 05:26
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Originally Posted by Keygrip
- but ICAO are taking this seriously.
...and so is JAA.
Best,
PE
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Old 5th Jul 2006, 11:56
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English language proficiency testing is a recently new mandate from ICAO, which is scheduled to take effect in 2008. Pilots, ATC and radio station operators will be required to be tested and proficient to ICAO level 4. Details of the process can be found at http://www.flightsafety.org/pubs/fsd_2005.html

Cheers
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Old 5th Jul 2006, 12:38
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Thanks,

http://www.pprune.org/forums/showthread.php?t=230474

PE
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Old 5th Jul 2006, 14:06
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Ryanair to test pilots in English Language

Well why not, the Koreans are?
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Old 5th Jul 2006, 14:17
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Perhaps Binter could do the same - those who visit the Canaries reguarly will understand ! Que ?
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Old 5th Jul 2006, 14:53
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Is this not a new ICAO requirement? Eventually everyone will have to be tested in English.
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Old 5th Jul 2006, 15:05
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The dreaded test

Hi everyone,

All pilots, according to the ICAO (PPL, CPL, ATPL- only glider and balloon pilots are exempt) must be level four or above in all six linguistic areas of English Language Proficiency (ELP), including "native tongue speakers of English". The issue Doc. 9835 from ICAO stipulates that even native speakers must be tested. The manner in which CAAs do so is up to them however staying within the requirements. (No pencil and paper tests, no academic tests, all aviation work-related, specific to the task, etc.) The manual goes on to aid in the standards' implementation and test design. It must be a test designed strictly following the guidelines.

JAA has issued the draft (now closed for comment) and should be put into the FCLs come September. The draft has said that CAAs must accredit a test or testing body. There are some other slight differences between the ICAO standards and those to be issued by JAA but the "gist" is the same.

Best to all,

PE
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Old 6th Jul 2006, 15:30
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As this test is obviously biased against those who don't speak English very well, they will need to have extra points added to their score to enable them to pass. Once again an example of white English speaking males discriminating against, and oppressing minorities.

The test will end up being watered down to the extent where anyone will be able to get through. A good idea, but it won't work, similar thing tried with Sydney taxi drivers.
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Old 9th Jul 2006, 13:53
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If you hear Chinglish, Japlish, Konglish or something similar in the radio and both cannot articulate themselves on the radio then you agree that the test is needed. Who test´s the other 4 ICAO languages? Chinese, Russian, Spanish and French???? Fears are within some far east operators that they may cannot "pass" 20% of the present pilots they have into the minimum level required. More Expats to fill the gaps? What a mess, you are not welcome as you "take" a Job of another Buddy....

Fly safe and land happy

NG
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Old 9th Jul 2006, 17:11
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Originally Posted by B737NG
If you hear Chinglish, Japlish, Konglish or something similar in the radio and both cannot articulate themselves on the radio then you agree that the test is needed. Who test´s the other 4 ICAO languages? Chinese, Russian, Spanish and French???? Fears are within some far east operators that they may cannot "pass" 20% of the present pilots they have into the minimum level required. More Expats to fill the gaps? What a mess, you are not welcome as you "take" a Job of another Buddy....
Fly safe and land happy
NG
Dear B737NG,

Studies show it takes about 200 study hours to advance one level in language proficiency. By putting pilots and air traffic controllers in the language learning environment years ago (Sept. 2004 was the first of just a series of ICAO symposiums dealing with the test and implementation of the applied 2008 standards) this would have been adequate time for these 20% you mention to raise their proficiency levels. Many countries have been working on implementation and much progress has been made. It boils down to money in many situations. Many, many waited or kept their heads in the sand saying that the date would be extended, the application to certain licenses or air space would change and so forth. The fact is that since 2004 the standards and help in implementation have been there, it has taken this long for the "word" to get out.

As for hearing Chinglish, Japlish, Konglish you can also hear German English, Italian English, Spanglish etc, etc. The standard is in "plain language". I am a big supporter of International English, but aviation English is an English that leaves out idioms and idiomatic phrasal verbs. It focuses on certain structures (grammar) and vocabulary (including, but certainly not limited to, technical vocabulary) and teaches exactly the language needed when radiotelephony phraseologies do not suffice. If the people who are on the radio every day who speak English fluently would use only this type of language it would help that 20% (if not more) communicate too.

As for who will test the French, Russian and Chinese; there is a Russian test in the making and it is very good. The Chinese have been deciding on the test they will use as well as a training solution. I am not sure what the French have planned.

Pilots and ATC are motivated learners, nothing like thinking your job will be given to the first Ex-Pat that passes to get you studying. No, it won't be nice to take the place of someone else simply because they speak English at a higher proficiency level, but it is not nice to think that an airplane falls out of the sky due the flight deck couldn't communicate. Not nice at all when incidents and accidents are due to miscommunications.

The ICAO operational level 4 isn't native-like English. It is a proficiency level that insures one understands and can make himself understood to an international aviation community. (ICAO's words, not mine)

Best,
PE
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Old 16th Jul 2006, 10:56
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ICAO Language Proficiency Requirements — Rated Speech Samples (AUD001)

An amendment for the testing solution
Please note that the section on "Radiotelephony content" has been amended. The amendment was needed to clarify and accurately reflect the Organization's policy concerning language testing in line with the Note in the Appendix to Annex 1 — Personnel Licensing. Please note the amended text below and refer to it in your language testing activities.
http://www.icao.int/td/aud001/textv11.html
Radiotelephony content
Because of the high stakes involved, pilots and air traffic controllers deserve to be tested in a context similar to that in which they work and test content should therefore be relevant to their roles in the work-place. The descriptors for Vocabulary and Comprehension for ICAO Operational Level 4 refer to "work-related topics". Tests should provide test-takers with sufficient and varied opportunities to use plain language in aviation work-related contexts in order to demonstrate their ability with respect to each descriptor in the Language Proficiency Rating Scale and the Holistic Descriptors. To achieve this, the design of tests should be undertaken by a team of linguistic and operational subject matter experts to ensure validity, reliability and operational relevance.
The Note found in the Appendix to Annex 1 indicates that the Holistic Descriptors and Rating Scale apply to the use of phraseology as well as plain language. Just as testing of ICAO phraseology cannot be used to assess plain language proficiency, neither can English language proficiency tests be used to test ICAO standardized phraseology.
It is acceptable that a test contain a scripted test task in which phraseology is included in a prompt. The test task may be used as a warm up or an ice-breaker and elicit a plain language response from the test taker. Test prompts should not be intended to evaluate specific technical knowledge concerning operations. For example, prompts such as "What is the separation minima for aircraft being vectored for an ILS approach?", or "Describe the different flight modes of the A320 flight control system" are not acceptable.
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Old 20th Jul 2006, 11:15
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So how are all ICAO member states doing???

I am professionally interested in asking how all the various ICAO members are progressing with this English proficiency requirement in each country, any comments??
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Old 20th Jul 2006, 13:49
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In early 2007 there will be a survey to assess the progress for each member state. During the safety audits being performed now I am not sure they are addressing the situation.

PE
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Old 20th Jul 2006, 19:07
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I just has been checked in China.
CBT based test:
- Select the correct word; graphic description
- Select the correct word; oral description
- Add correct word in sentence
- Answer context question; after text reading
- Answer context question; after listening to a text
- Find correct answer to a standard aviation clearance; text based
- Find correct answer to a standard aviation clearance given orally
- Answer orally to a clearance given orally. Computer records the answer via a mike and it is graded later on by the instructor.

This taken between two and three hours. Level is easy but non-trivial.
IMHO, if you failed, you better stay away from some american airport!
If your grade is just above pass, you should be confident with all standard clearance, and understand most other r/t.

A nice step in the correct direction.
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Old 20th Jul 2006, 22:44
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If competent english is required how come Air France and Montreal ATC speak french? Is it something to with the language police in Quebec maybe?
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Old 22nd Jul 2006, 00:10
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Originally Posted by skol
If competent english is required how come Air France and Montreal ATC speak french? Is it something to with the language police in Quebec maybe?
Quebec French is not French - as any person from both Quebec and France will tell you ! This could explain many things...
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