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Elevated helipad for private owners use only. United Kingdom

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Elevated helipad for private owners use only. United Kingdom

Old 7th Aug 2022, 22:44
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Elevated helipad for private owners use only. United Kingdom

hi all
Can anyone help with chapter and verse regarding using an elevated helipad on single story building within the curtilage of a private house, for private owners' use only,
single engined turbine,jet ranger,gazelle, ec130 size.
not for night use only day VFR

What is it allowed ? has anyone already done it? what are the pitfalls? CAA rules? safety considerations? planning rules? training required ? [not in any particular order]
Only for private use by owners of the house in their own private helicopter. this is also in the UK not anywhere else in the world
i have looked on the BHA site and downloaded helicopter site keepers but this is mainly for commercial operators
rule 5 should not be a problem

Last edited by Helicopterdriverguy; 7th Aug 2022 at 22:50. Reason: added rule 5
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Old 8th Aug 2022, 10:55
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Planning notice 24 stated that a field does not necessarily constitute a change of use unless landing lights a hard standing and a hanger were built. I had monster battles with a National Park 25 years ago. Basically within the curtilage of your property carry on. Even Euro law states ( The law of human rights )
that you may access your personal private property by any reasonable means
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Old 8th Aug 2022, 11:01
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BHA Information PDF/Leaflets took the option of remaining 'out of date' until they are back 'in date' again
As long as you have planning permission sorted - as a purposed elevated helipad would so require - you can do what you like (within a large degree) - assuming you have clear approach/departure paths and uncongested etc there are various publications for AOC use buy also contain some hard-earned 'lessons' you might like to employ in your own design. Web search UK Hospital Helipad Design CAP etc etc
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Old 8th Aug 2022, 11:20
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Make sure your single storey building is strong enough for the weight of the helipad and helicopter.
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Old 8th Aug 2022, 11:36
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hughes 500 its actually not in the field its within the house boundary
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Old 8th Aug 2022, 11:39
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crab its envisaged that a steel frame will fitted over the single story building as the building wont be strong enough and weight calculations carried out by approved person
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Old 8th Aug 2022, 14:19
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How high off the ground is it. If less than 3m it's not elevated anyway.

Is it within the definition of congested area? If not I don't think you have many if any barriers
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Old 8th Aug 2022, 21:30
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Do bear in mind that the structure must be designed to take an impact from the committal point with a ROD more than you would normally land with in the event of an engine failure. I seem to recall from physics (a long time ago) that the force of an object falling from an infinitesimally small height starts at 2G, so the structure needs to be constructed appropriately. Perhaps the HCA could point you in the right direction for someone to advise?
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Old 9th Aug 2022, 10:40
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Originally Posted by detgnome View Post
I seem to recall from physics (a long time ago) that the force of an object falling from an infinitesimally small height starts at 2G
Better re-read that section :-)
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Old 9th Aug 2022, 12:53
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Originally Posted by detgnome View Post
Do bear in mind that the structure must be designed to take an impact from the committal point with a ROD more than you would normally land with in the event of an engine failure. I seem to recall from physics (a long time ago) that the force of an object falling from an infinitesimally small height starts at 2G, so the structure needs to be constructed appropriately. Perhaps the HCA could point you in the right direction for someone to advise?
what’s HCA please
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Old 9th Aug 2022, 13:12
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Originally Posted by Hot and Hi View Post
Better re-read that section :-)
'Tis true. From the mouth of a PhD structural engineer I worked with. The example - placing a glass onto a hard table.

The glass and table are both elastic - springy. So when the contact of the glass occurs it initially compresses the table and the glass, but then that spring recoils - since it was compressed with the weight of the glass, that compression force is added to the weight of the glass -> 2Gs. The movement is very small, but it's there. Interposing materials that aren't springy, such as fabric or plastic foam eliminates that rebound.
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Old 9th Aug 2022, 13:41
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MD 600 if you notice i did say within curtilage then carry on. I guess though one might need planning permission to change ones house to have an elevated helipad.
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