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Serious skill?

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Serious skill?

Old 27th Oct 2020, 16:57
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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Or maybe the situation / location was very professionally assessed by very experienced ground crew which are part of a highly professional Team and the driver trusts them 100% - who knows?
In the new digital times where everything is on video in the moment it happens, for me it seems that the armchair pilots always know it better! Why do some here not accept that other people also know how to use their working tools?
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Old 27th Oct 2020, 20:24
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by evil7
Or maybe the situation / location was very professionally assessed by very experienced ground crew which are part of a highly professional Team and the driver trusts them 100% - who knows?
In the new digital times where everything is on video in the moment it happens, for me it seems that the armchair pilots always know it better! Why do some here not accept that other people also know how to use their working tools?
Well evil7,
it seems, that you either haven't learned how to discuss properly or you are not willing to do so.
Instead of picking up arguments and checking pro/contra - where you can also bring in your opinion, you decide to make assumptions about the situation and getting personal, calling pilots, which have a different view of the flight "armchair pilots".
If you're not able, to take on - productive criticism - I wouldn't hire you as a pilot - then you are risk for yourself - and others.
Nobody is perfect - and with doing things often enough, someone easily looses the perspective - which I guess happened here.
But accidents happen fast - have a look through helicopter crashes at YouTube. Most of the pilots didn't believe, it could happen to them....
To the arguments.
Even with a highly trained and professional crew - at the end, if he survives a crash, they get the pilot at his balls.
He's responsible for the safe conduction of the flight. The crew might also be mentioned in the report as well as the operations - but the pilot decides.
Even the best ground crew can't look behind every fence, access the stability of every fence, roof and tree in the area.
On the video you see bystanders taking videos and photographs. Ever seen a man hit by a branch?
You can believe me, that even with a 206 you can bring down trees - normally not with the first flight, or the second - but with the thirty+ flight, you can....
And nobody will tell you when it will happen.
I´ve blown fences over, have seen metal advertisement sheets (stadium) go flying higher then the helicopter, cars damaged by flying debris- and learned from that.
You're somehow right, by now I'm actually sitting with my ATPL(H) more time in a chair then a cockpit - but only to get the other boys flying - safely.
Coordinating and preparing flights and missions I've additional insight in helicopter operations.
The bills from the airfields for landing/refueling are running over my desk, as well as the noise complaints and the damage claims of people....
Belive me, five minutes flying for safe operations/landing, without risking damage to property, is worth considering....
(Thats without considering a crash!)
My two cents

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Old 27th Oct 2020, 21:55
  #23 (permalink)  
 
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Well, you do have to remember that he probably took off from that same spot only a few minutes earlier. The scene was probably well controlled during the entire operation.
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Old 27th Oct 2020, 22:07
  #24 (permalink)  
 
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this story may help some of you understand the limitations of restricted category operations and why you cant fly in some areas.
feel free to dicuss...or whatever it is some of you do in here.

https://verticalmag.com/features/mak...cted-category/
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Old 28th Oct 2020, 20:04
  #25 (permalink)  
 
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Well MarcK,
taking off at that spot doesn't make things better.
Take a close look at the video, there are solar panels on one roof, not flush on but straight on an angeled roof - perfect to catch downwash.
Do you know, how well they are secured?
About well controlled - look at the bystanders filming. When things starts flying out of control, much to close for comfort.

Gray HorizonsHeli supplies a link to interesting reading - but even there, the operator named there looks for secured areas together with the authorities for his operations.
In my humble opinion it was an unnecessary risk operating direkt out of a town.
The school ground near by looks better - an a few flying minutes away are areas without any houses/risks for operation.
Better be safe than sorry ;-)
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Old 28th Oct 2020, 21:12
  #26 (permalink)  

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At least in this case there was a ground support team who had presumably secured the area.

I’m not qualified to fly in Canada but perception of risk apart, it seems to me there’s nothing to suggest that this was not done legally and above board.
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Old 28th Oct 2020, 21:38
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The date on this video is just after the CZULightningComplex fire was contained. You can see the haze/smoke in the background. Boulder Creek is just on the edge of that fire, for which they are still felling trees and chasing smokes. I'm guessing that this is related to the removal of dangerous trees in the area. I don't know if there were any other safer areas for the operation.
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Old 28th Oct 2020, 23:52
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You got to wonder how the traffic cones wouldn’t move if there was such mayhem?!
The area is a bit bigger than what it looks like in the video, and was closed for traffic.

Shy, don’t think you need to be qualified in Canada to fly in California.

Special 25,

What’s rushed about this? I’d say with the control of the longline, and subsequent landing is professional. Hanging around for a longer time than he spent, would be the opposite.


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Old 29th Oct 2020, 10:25
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Personally, I think it's very impressive the way that chap managed to pull the helicopter down onto the trailer all by himself. Must have taken a lot of effort yet he made it look easy.
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Old 29th Oct 2020, 12:37
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Looked like a briefed approach to a prepared area to me.What's the problem? Perfectly executed and people here are complaining. Sheesh.
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Old 29th Oct 2020, 17:34
  #31 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Flying Bull
The school ground near by looks better - an a few flying minutes away are areas without any houses/risks for operation.
Better be safe than sorry ;-)
This was in California---it is a minimum 6 week process to land and depart from school property. When I have lift work to do near one, we do everything wee can to find an alternate spot to use, it is just not worth the hassle.
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Old 29th Oct 2020, 17:50
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What is he doing when he first touched the ground with the cable, before repositioning to land? I wondered if grounding it, but that would happen anyway. There’s no load on it.
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Old 29th Oct 2020, 18:14
  #33 (permalink)  
 
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Never before has so much, been said about so little.
it was nifty flying.
is everyone so bored that this is what it takes to get through the day
Focus murkins, you have an election coming.
save your strength
Brits, your pubs are closed, rather discuss what defines a substantial meal.
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Old 29th Oct 2020, 19:37
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Originally Posted by 212man
What is he doing when he first touched the ground with the cable, before repositioning to land? I wondered if grounding it, but that would happen anyway. There’s no load on it.
He was dropping the chokers that were attached to the remote hook.
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Old 29th Oct 2020, 20:45
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Originally Posted by Gordy
He was dropping the chokers that were attached to the remote hook.
Thanks. That also crossed my mind but wasn’t sure why it had to be done a couple of hundred yards away. Cheers
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Old 29th Oct 2020, 22:01
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Originally Posted by Zombywoof
Looked like a briefed approach to a prepared area to me.What's the problem? Perfectly executed and people here are complaining. Sheesh.
FYI: It's only a problem, full of unnecessary risks, when it takes place on this side of the pond. Whereas take-offs and landings in the center of town on the other side of the pond are normal SOP complete with your standard tail-checker hanging out the door and surrounded by spectators.
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Old 29th Oct 2020, 23:04
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Originally Posted by wrench1
FYI: It's only a problem, full of unnecessary risks, when it takes place on this side of the pond.
Touche....
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Old 30th Oct 2020, 07:14
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@ wrench1

i was talking about risk assessment.
Setting Preventable risks against risks accepted, cause otherwise a life is at stake - is a little bit like comparing apples and pears 😉
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Old 30th Oct 2020, 17:58
  #39 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by Flying Bull
@ wrench1

i was talking about risk assessment.
Setting Preventable risks against risks accepted, cause otherwise a life is at stake - is a little bit like comparing apples and pears 😉
You are correct sir. Air Ambulance (apples) vs Air Rescue (Pears). Risk acceptable for an Air Ambulance flight is no different than that for any air taxi (FAR Pt. 135) flight in the U.S. We're not first responders, just rapid transport for critical care patients.
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Old 30th Oct 2020, 19:48
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Originally Posted by LRP
You are correct sir. Air Ambulance (apples) vs Air Rescue (Pears). Risk acceptable for an Air Ambulance flight is no different than that for any air taxi (FAR Pt. 135) flight in the U.S. We're not first responders, just rapid transport for critical care patients.
No first responders?
The video posted from Germany shows a first responder.
Even in the more dense populated Germany, there are areas, where an ambulance just takes to long to arrive.
For heart attack, stroke and some other medical emergencies (bleeding / accidents) time is critical for either survival or good recovery chances.
I.e. stroke, fast medication and transport in a stroke unit, chance of total recovery within weeks is great.
With time wasted, the patient might loose speech and control of limbs for a long time or not even get full control back.
Law is, that for SAR, medical emergencies, police and armed forces you don't have to stick to some of the rules ;-)
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