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Commercial pilots eating in flight

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Commercial pilots eating in flight

Old 29th Sep 2018, 10:15
  #21 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
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It was a traditional.

Some pilots SMOKE in flight
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 10:20
  #22 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
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Some pilots SMOKE in flight
I always did when I flew the North Sea and later on in China. I could never could get lost offshore; just follow the floating dogends back to base.
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 10:23
  #23 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
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Originally Posted by Vertical Freedom View Post
I remember my ole instructor Buck Ryan forcing me to peel Oranges for both of us to eat on Navex flights during my student Pilot days, so legs wrapped around the Cyclic. Taught You many skills like both hands for folding maps on surprise diversions etc.
... or to take the odd picture
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 11:31
  #24 (permalink)  
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Thanks for the insight into commercial ops and the stories! Keep 'em coming
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 11:52
  #25 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
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In Australia most of the rigs give food bags to the crews, what they don't eat we engineers demolish, usually sandwiches, fruit, maybe chocolates - Mars Bars etc (left for the Engineers to stay in their good books), biscuits and a drink .
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 12:03
  #26 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: 60 north
Age: 57
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Belly Tank

Apropos chicken curry go to waste.
My FO was looking forward to his homemade curry , piping hot.
For some strange reason a lot of pilots were I work choose to use the Teck Log as a table, a hard plastic cover job.
That day the crew -coordination was not good . And as the Cabin Crew let go of the dish it started sliding towards the center pedestal.
In slow-motion, the Fo compensated with a hard right bank on the glass dish to avoid total avionic meltdown.
Now it was heading towards his crotch, which he deftly avoided by a hard left bank and nosedown with the Log as the dish promptly left and did a forward half Lomchewack or something like that and impacted the floor inverted.
Clean up operation continued well into the descend.
Nothing to do with helicopters , except maybe for the split second the dish auto-rotated inverted.
This all took place at 37 000 feet some were over France.


Regards
Cpt B
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 12:20
  #27 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 1999
Location: Gold Coast, Australia
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In no particular order:

North Sea shuttle, SP in a 212 and lunch was served during a running refuel: airborne to discover a (very) large plate full of rice and curry along with eating tools. Only solution was to drop the window and turf the lot

Rig support off Eire where a chance comment to the cook that the smoked salmon sandwiches yesterday were much appreciated, led to a routine sandwich with more smoked salmon than bread. We'd take the lot back to the hotel and have a proper feed later!

Nigeria where the ice cream from the American rig was to die for, but no room for anything else

Bombay High where the curries were akin to a nuclear sunset: to be consumed at your own risk.

10 hour day flying SP in a Wessex from northern WA to just off Timor-est and back, sandwiches and lots of liquid in 37C

12 hour days on fires throwing water at the ground where any food and water is welcome, often provided by supporting locals who value the work done to protect their homes. That's always humbling.

Lots more spring to mind, but anyone who considers eating in flight to be 'poor airmanship' is living in a dreamworld.
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 13:44
  #28 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2002
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anyone who considers eating in flight to be 'poor airmanship' is living in a dreamworld.
I have eaten while flying...from cold Army C-Rations to proper meals from first class catering during VIP events.

There is one particular Bristow S-58T crewman, later he went on to SAR duties, that if he knew how many smoked Salmon sandwiches I ordered up (he would only eat boiled ham sarnies and would invariably hand up his Salmon feasts to me, he would beat me to death.

One has to be aware of choking hazards during single pilot ops....or perhaps spoilage concerns if the food items are saved for the. next ground stop if Ambient Temps are high.

But....as that Eacott fellow says....in a most polite way....if you really think eating is bad form....you have lived a very cloistered life.
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 14:01
  #29 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
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Originally Posted by hueyracer View Post
But i consider it very bad airmanship if a pilot eats during the flight (except for long distance flights, of course)...
Fairly normal day:

Take off at 0700, report at 0600, leave house at 0530, breakfast (if you can face it that time if the morning) about 0515-ish?

land at 1000, rotors running turnround, off 1045–ish, to land again at about 1330/1345-ish.

Without eating anything at all since 0515.

I would consider it “very bad airmanship” to not eat something during that period.
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 14:46
  #30 (permalink)  
 
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Forcados gave up giving fodder years ago TF....
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 15:08
  #31 (permalink)  
 
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Griffo.....if you consider that which was offered up by Forcardos.....fodder....you are sickerr than I ever thought.
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 15:27
  #32 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
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Originally Posted by hueyracer View Post


But i consider it very bad airmanship if a pilot eats during the flight (except for long distance flights, of course)...
That's extremely naive. There are lots and lots of reasons to eat during a flight. I have worked extensively where I haven't shut down the helicopter for 12 hours straight. Should I not eat for 12 hours?
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 16:04
  #33 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
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pilot1234567. After your 12 hours without shut down,was there any lub oil remaining ?
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 17:01
  #34 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
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Originally Posted by cafesolo View Post
pilot1234567. After your 12 hours without shut down,was there any lub oil remaining ?
I have seen days of 12 and more hours without shutdown in Canada while fighting fires, get it going at sunrise and shut it down at sunset, double crewing of course. One pilot starts the day (single pilot here) and the other one finishes it Sometimes only one shutdown for the day for a quick briefing to the next pilot and it goes again. Hot fuelling is legal here in Canada so we uses it.
Soo, breakfast and lunch while you are flying is mandatory just about.

Pilot1234567 is right.

JD
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 19:36
  #35 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
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Certainly a very illuminating and entertaining thread so far!
However, I have not yet read anything about any (minor ) peanuts so far, please correct me if I'm wrong?
Come on guys and gals, a fellows career plans seem to be challenged by mundane bureaucracy here. Lets take it a bit serious if possible. This whole peanut deal seems a bit bizarre to me, to be honest.
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Old 30th Sep 2018, 02:07
  #36 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
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from cold Army C-Rations
You got into the wrong line of work with that twin rotor thingy SAS, Huey you just placed the can on the engine deck while you flew a few more insertions and lunch was good to go, hot.
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Old 30th Sep 2018, 02:59
  #37 (permalink)  
 
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The Combining Transmission had a horizontal ledge that worked a treat for heating C Rations....or just put them into the Exhaust of the engine and motor the starter for a bit. The engine starters were hydraulically driven thus no time limit on motoring.

We carried a five gallon Igloo Water can filled with water and a big block of ice so we had cold sodas and beer to go along with the C Rations.
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Old 30th Sep 2018, 04:33
  #38 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
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Originally Posted by cafesolo View Post
pilot1234567. After your 12 hours without shut down,was there any lub oil remaining ?
Plenty.

Despite constantly dripping oil, the 212 will work all day, every day without complaint. I check the oils when I'm out taking having a pee, but as long as they are at the appropriate levels at the start of the day there are generally no issues.
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Old 30th Sep 2018, 05:05
  #39 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by cafesolo View Post
pilot1234567. After your 12 hours without shut down,was there any lub oil remaining ?
Just the same in Oz, I’d multi crew for campaign fires and the machine would run 12 or more hours without a shutdown; hot refuels were the norm. Never, ever an issue with oils or any other components from sustained running.

Going even further OT, RN Sea Kings on extended ASW exercises would only shut down briefly every couple of sorties (8 hours running) for an oil sample to be drained for SOAP analysis, again never any need for lubes to be topped up even after the few millilitres were drained for the sample
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Old 30th Sep 2018, 06:10
  #40 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: East of Africa
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You guys saw the thread title, right?

"Commercial pilots eating in Flight".

Not "Utility pilots", not "military pilots".

Those days of 12-hour flying time is long gone even for Offshore-pilots......

Again i bring up the term "sterile cockpit procedure"-if you´re doing short hops, you dont eat-period.

If you´re doing long legs, you usually get a break in between nowadays....


If one of my engineers would call me, saying "we have to ground the helicopter tomorrow, as we need to pull the radios out to remove the spicy chicken soup one of the pilots poured over it", i would kick this pilots ass..
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