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Single pilot multi-engine Regs

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Single pilot multi-engine Regs

Old 12th Aug 2016, 14:00
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Join Date: May 2010
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Single pilot multi-engine Regs

Hello,

I am trying to find some FAA info regarding type ratings for single pilot in helicopters multi-engine (IFR) aircraft.
For fixed wing it is clear that it if the aircraft can be flown SP (under 91) you need to perform the check as a single pilot commander otherwise you will be restricted.
But it does not mention about helicopters, as for example AW109, S-76, AW139 and others...

And also, could someone light me up on how it is performed under EASA regs as well?

5-729 PILOT TYPE RATING THAT MAY BE PERFORMED AS EITHER A SINGLE‑PILOT OR WITH AN SECOND IN COMMAND (SIC). Practical tests for pilot type ratings may be performed as either a single-pilot or with an SIC in accordance with § 61.43(b).

A. General. This policy guidance shows how to record whether the pilot type rating practical test was performed as a single-pilot or by using an SIC crewmember.

1) In a previous version of this order, the FAA had established policy that clarified the intent of 14 CFR part 91, § 91.531(a) and (b) for allowing practical tests for some pilot type ratings to be performed as either a single‑pilot or with an SIC.

2) This policy addresses performing pilot type rating practical tests as a single-pilot crew composition or with an SIC pilot crewmember in:

· Large airplanes that were certificated under Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) 41, where the airplane’s TC authorizes single-pilot operations. Although SFAR 41 expired on September 13, 1983, many of the large airplanes that were certificated under SFAR 41 are still in active service (i.e., per § 91.531(a)(1));
· Turbojet airplanes where the airplane’s TC or Airplane Flight Manual (AFM) allows for both single-pilot and two-pilot operations (i.e., per § 91.531(a)(2) and (b));
· Commuter category airplanes that have a passenger seating configuration, excluding pilot seats, of nine seats or fewer, where the airplane’s TC authorized single-pilot operations (i.e., per
§ 91.531(a)(3));
· Situations where the FAA may issue a letter of authorization (LOA) for authorizing single-pilot operations if that airplane is designed for and TC’d with only one pilot station (i.e., per
§ 91.531(b)); and
· Situations where the FAA has issued grants of exemption from §§ 91.9(a) and 91.531(a)(1) and (2) to some training providers that give single-pilot training.

3) The following are some makes and models of airplanes where applicants may perform the pilot type rating practical test as either a single-pilot or with an SIC. In the future, this list of airplanes may expand when more turbojet airplanes (that are commonly referred to as very light jets) receive certification with both single-pilot and two‑pilot crew compliments.

· Cessna 501;
· Cessna 525;
· Cessna 551;
· Raytheon 390;
· Beech 300, airplanes that were certificated under SFAR 41;
· Beech 1900 and Beech 1900C, airplanes that were certificated under SFAR 41;
· Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica EMB 110, airplanes that were certificated under SFAR 41;
· Beech 2000;
· Swearingen Fairchild Aircraft Corporation SA-227-CC and SA-227-DC airplanes, certificated in the commuter category;
· Certain large airplanes that were certificated under SFAR 41, if the airplane’s TC authorizes single‑pilot operations;
· Certain turbojet airplanes, if the airplane’s TC authorizes single-pilot operations; and
· Certain commuter category airplanes, if the airplane’s TC authorizes single-pilot operations.
Soave_Pilot is offline  
Old 13th Aug 2016, 03:53
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I can't quote the regulations on this, but I can tell you that at the training centre where I work, for an FAA initial type rating on a AW139, one of the sorties in the syllabus is flown single pilot.
Then in the check ride at the end there are particular elements (some of the approaches etc) which have to be completed without assistance if you have a copilot in with you for the check. I am not sure of the exact details, as i am not a TCE.
The A109 doesn't need a TR remember, as it is below the weight requirement under FAA rules.
Non-PC Plod is offline  
Old 13th Aug 2016, 04:46
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EASA requires 10 hours of instruction if it is your first MP-Type-Rating.
Another (Add-On) ME-Type-Rating is 5 hours training.

This is for SP ONLY!
MP requires another rating...
hueyracer is offline  
Old 13th Aug 2016, 07:13
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Join Date: Aug 2011
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Under EASA once you got a type rating (in ME heli) it's obvious that you've to fly the helicopter so the type rating will be SPO-ME.
Some helicopters require additional instruments/installations to be flown SPO, and first you've to refer to certification basis in the RFM that state the minimum crew.

Second step is looking into what type of operation or flight you're going to perform according to country aviation rules an operator's OM.
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Old 13th Aug 2016, 08:44
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Under EASA regs, you will find slightly different interpretations from different countries.
You can either do a SP type rating course and check (if the helicopter is certified for SP Ops), or you can do a MP TR course and check (if the helicopter is certified as a multi pilot helicopter) The third option is to do a MP type rating course/ check on a helicopter which is certified as single-pilot, but is being flown under an AOC for multi-pilot operations. (So, you will need an Ops manual which describes the operation)
On top of this you can do a SP-MP or an MP-SP conversion course and check. For any MP TR, you will need to be MCC qualified first.

Your annual proficiency check could be MP, SP or both. Some authorities will allow you to do both together (obviously you will have to fly some elements of the check without any assistance from another crew member). Other authorities will tell you you have to do 2 checks to achieve this. Depends on which bit of EASA-land issued your licence.
Non-PC Plod is offline  
Old 13th Aug 2016, 12:32
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Cool guys, thanks for the info.

Looks like SP and MP ratings differ, requiring specific training all around.
Soave_Pilot is offline  

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