Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Aircrew Forums > Rotorheads
Reload this Page >

The Rotary Nostalgia Thread

Rotorheads A haven for helicopter professionals to discuss the things that affect them

The Rotary Nostalgia Thread

Reply

Old 14th Mar 2013, 00:26
  #1881 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Ireland
Posts: 377
Sav, I was also surprised by Jack Schweibold's assessment of the various LOH contenders. How could he not immediately fall in love with the little OH-6? It turns out the early YOH-6 had some serious vibration problems with the main rotor. Maybe Hiller had their machine dialled-in very early on in proceedings and it flew the best of the three at that time. Jack Schweibold went on to set one of the 23 world records that the OH-6 would claim in 1966. As the LOH contest progressed, the Bell OH-4 was eliminated quite quickly. At selection time, the Hiller and the Hughes were deemed to be both broadly equal in quality and it came down to the lowest bidder. Despite Howard Hughes' shenanigans in winning the LOH, perhaps the best helicopter at that time won and thankfully it spawned the large family of 500s that many love today. Sadly, it seems, the FH1100 was the big loser in the end.

Thanks as well for the information in relation to the heliborne American Ambassador to Ireland. Fascinating stuff.

500 Fan.
500 Fan is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 15th Mar 2013, 10:25
  #1882 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Milano, Italia
Posts: 2,425
My apologies but .. the Guest family tree contains some patent anomalies in terms of dates, most notably Sir Winston who's longevity was framed by the dates 1874-1965. Thank you to the PPRuNer who kindly pointed this out to me!

500 Fan: If you would like to read some really fascinating stuff then how about this .. 'The Gulfstream that went racing!'

There I was believing that I possessed at least a basic awareness of corporate aviation in Ireland from the early 80's (especially in matters relating to turf) when I discovered on a plank thread (apostacy I know!) that instead of landing at the nearest airport and having her passengers helicoptered in to the racecouse .. a particular Gulfstream in Ireland in 1983 decided to land directly on the racecourse .. as in on the grass gallops! Now that was a fasinating read, lol! Check it out here.

More Hiller .. of the non-turbine variety


Hiller UH-12E G-ATVN of the Central Electricity Generating Board at Southampton's Eastleigh Airport in August 1969 (Photo: Bary Friend)

ATVN began her service in the UK with United Helicopters of Redhill (who were they?) in 1966 being bought by the Central Electricity Generating Board the following year and then by Management Aviation in 1970.

ps: My thanks to Barry Friend for this photo; this being his first contribution to the thread.

pps: The roof of the building in this photo seems to be wearing a camouflage motif!

ppps: You would think that the CEGC would have been able to afford some weed-killer for their landing pad.
Savoia is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 16th Mar 2013, 01:08
  #1883 (permalink)  
Gnome de PPRuNe
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Too close to Croydon for comfort
Age: 54
Posts: 4,952
United Helicopters of Redhill (who were they?)
I always thought UH was a Bristows subsidiary, but Wikipedia tells me such a company existed as a JV between Stan Hiller and Henry Kaiser - so, UK sub flogging Hillers to the market over here?
treadigraph is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 16th Mar 2013, 09:57
  #1884 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Milano, Italia
Posts: 2,425
Hopefully someone will be able to confirm the details. Perhaps Bristows were at one point supporting Hiller sales through this company as part of the JV?

For Nigel 'Ozzy' Osborn:

Nigel: From your era ..


Helicopter Utilities FH1100 VH-UTZ at Sydney's Mascot Airport on 5th April 1969 (Photo: Greg Banfield)

Evidently this craft flew in Fifi for a time (as DQ-FBZ) but was eventually destroyed or substantially damaged on 10th February 1977 at Hoxton Park.

I am assuming that Rosemary Arnold (Australia's first woman helicopter pilot) must have been a friend of yours given that she was flying at around the same time as you!


Rosemary Arnold with FH1100 N420FH in 1968 (most likely during one of her Stateside visits)
Savoia is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 17th Mar 2013, 13:53
  #1885 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Posts: 911
Rosemary was a remarkable woman, very attractive even after 4 children! She was very aviation driven & paid for her flying training with her own money, so her husband couldn't complain. Started on little planks then qualified on helicopters in 1967 or so. Met her twice at Bankstown Airport when she had a Bell 47J2A. As you would expect she had great trouble finding commercial work as no one wanted a woman pilot in those days! She is still involved although nowadays she does more lecturing than flying being in her 70s.

Enjoyed a few hours in UTZ!

Last edited by Nigel Osborn; 17th Mar 2013 at 22:05.
Nigel Osborn is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 17th Mar 2013, 20:59
  #1886 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Ireland
Posts: 377
Here are two photos of Utilities' FH1100s on Antarctic duty. They are fitted with some heavy-duty cargo racks.

All sizes | Up and away | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

Leaving Mawson #2 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

500 Fan.
500 Fan is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 17th Mar 2013, 23:57
  #1887 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Posts: 911
I feel the odd one out! Having flown about 20 different types, I have to say I never really liked the 500. Too cramped, no luggage space, too little endurance, silly rudder pedals that pulled to one side when you took your feet off! Maybe I didn't have enough hours on type to get to love it...< 100 hours only.
Nigel Osborn is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 18th Mar 2013, 23:24
  #1888 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: England
Posts: 1,249
I remember speaking to the managing director of Holborn helicopters about 20 years ago, they had just replaced a 206 with a 500C (G-LINC?).
He said the most noticeable difference between the two aircraft was that he now received maintenance bills that had less than 4 digits.
A credit to the aircraft and the Sywell based maintenace organisation.
ericferret is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 19th Mar 2013, 10:09
  #1889 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Milano, Italia
Posts: 2,425
500 Fan: Great shots. One wonders how the 1100 coped with these 'luggage racks', power wise?

Nigel: I was sure she had come across your radar at some point!

Agaricus: When I first encountered the 500 I had been flying the 206L and the 500 (for me) didn't really 'hit the spot'. But, my introduction had been through training exercises and when some years later I got to put her through her paces in an operational contect .. I was most impressed. For the work we were performing she was ideal, I would venture to say .. untouchable! If the LIII is on your 'wish list' .. why not go a couple of digits higher and opt for the 407 which, as it happens, has some '500-esque' handling qualities!

Hiller 12E (above): Barry Friend (who photographed th Hiller 12E above) has written to say that the camouflage roof was a left over from the second world war and that the craft had landed upon the signal square which was no longer in use (hence the tufts of grass!).

Eric: The 'C' model with its C18 was probably more economical than the 206 but .. they still like to be fed with fuel!


Hughes 500C (369HS) G-LINC as seen at Cranfield on 3rd July 1994 (Photo: Malcolm Clarke)

LINC had an 'incident' at Sywell on 2nd January 2006 a summary of which reads:

Initially, the pilot flew 16 nm from Sywell to Catthorpe, near Rugby in Warwckshre, in order to pick up hs passenger. After landing, the pilot kept the engine running while his passenger boarded. They then flew to Folkestone Race Course (3 nm point-to-point) where they spent the day. The helicopter was not refuelled at Folkestone because no fuel was available.

The flight back to Sywell was uneventful until just north of Luton Airport. At this point the FUEL LOW caution light flickered once or twice. The pilot was not concerned as this had occurred to him before with a low fuel state. He attributed the flickering caption to the fuel moving around in the tank as a result of air turbulence. Prior to this, the pilot had not made a fuel burn check while en route.

At approxmately 10 nm from Sywell the FUEL LOW caution light came on permanently. He was not too worried by this because his GPS indcated he was 6 mins from Sywell. He believed that when the FUEL LOW caution light came on, he still had 15 mins flying time available.

Due to a number of microlight aircraft in the circuit at Sywell, the pilot elected to join the circuit at the end of the downwind leg rather than fly a straight-in approach. Whilst on final approach, at 400 ft agl, the engine flamed out. The pilot commenced an autorotation and landed firmly short of the threshold of Runway 23. He did not recall what hs cyclic control inputs were durng the touchdown. The pilot and his passenger vacated the helicopter uninjured.

Full report here.

I'm not sure whether the AAIB report author intended to be humorous in his compilation of this summary but .. his litany of events and the driver's responses (underlined) does have the effect of tickling the corners of one's mouth!
Savoia is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 19th Mar 2013, 10:50
  #1890 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Gold Coast, Queensland
Posts: 911
Sav

Another remarkable female pilot was Yvonne Butler in Brisbane. She suffered the usual prejudices but fixed that by forming her own company! Ppruner Peter Manktelow used to fly for her, so knows her much better than I do! I had the pleasure of making up a foursome for dinner, thanks to Herbie Ray & wife, a wonderful one armed engineer! Herbie had an ulterior motive which never happened!
Nigel Osborn is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 19th Mar 2013, 21:25
  #1891 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 869
I suspect the United Helicopters mentioned earlier was indeed a Bristow affiliation....they also hadS-55s registered at one point on oil work. The UH-12 illustrated is in the same colours as the ones used by Bristow on the Middle Wallop training contract,and the one in the Helicopter Museum.
Which reminds me.....anyone got any wooden or metal Hiller main blades suitable for static display ?
heli1 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 19th Mar 2013, 22:09
  #1892 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Dublin
Age: 40
Posts: 63
FH-1100 (OH-5) FIRST FLIGHT by Jack Schweibold

Hiller Air Museum located in San Mateo, California, announced it will again host the Vertical Challenge Helicopter Air Show June 16th, 10am to 4pm. (1) This comprehensive showcase of rotorcraft brings back memories of my first flights in the predecessor of the Fairchild Hiller FH-1100, the YOH-5 some 50 years ago. I had just completed fifty hours of required flight on the new Allison YT63 Turbine Engine, now the Rolls-Royce/Allison 250. Prototype engines were then released to Hiller, Bell and Hughes for their respective helicopters designed and built for the Army’s Light Observation Helicopter Competition. Our engine test aircraft at Allison was a Bell 47-J dressed in Navy colors. The Navy used this model as an anti-submarine Torpedo Helicopter.
Hiller’s maiden flight in the YOH-5 (FH-1100) was January, 21st 1963 with Bell and Hughes launching their models in the same period. Competition among the manufacturers was brutal and the secrecy requirements were ferocious. I was the Allison test pilot commissioned by the Army to be the first to fly and evaluate the three aircraft. Confidentiality was especially tight for those of us working with the engine as it powered all three contenders. Sworn to secrecy by signing “Thou Shall Not Tell” documents, I was dispatched from Indianapolis to the various manufacturers. I was amazed at the quality of design, performance and workmanship in the Hiller machine. While I couldn’t offer comparative remarks during the two week trip, it looked like the winner. Effectively, it highlighted state-of-the art construction. I valued the attention given to its serviceability. Battlefield maintenance of engine and related components could be easily addressed by merely sliding a clamshell cowling rearward on horizontal tracks along the tail boom.
My initial test flights confirmed earlier OEM engineering assessments that the engine needed quicker responsiveness when recovering from an aborted autorotation touchdown. Otherwise, the little engine pumping out an awesome 318hp, at half the weight of a reciprocating engine, performed extraordinarily well. After some modification to the fuel control, the Allison 250 with reduced acceleration time made an excellent performance pairing in all these light helicopters with the added benefit of modular construction that facilitated a new era for field serviceability. The YOH-5 did not win or maybe even ever had a chance to compete. In a competition that featured the initial winner, Hughes - as in Howard, being brought before a congressional investigation for tampering with the selection process that eventually resulted in the bulk of the production contract going to Bell. Hiller had elected to drop from the military contest and instead built over 250 civil FH-1100’s. Much like the venerable DC-3, this helicopter remains in certified service almost fifty years later. Currently serviced by FH-1100 Manufacturing Corporation (2), recent reports (3) indicate its manufacture may continue into the future through agreements with China … it’s hard to keep a good old girl down!
Shane101 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 22nd Mar 2013, 22:39
  #1893 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: uk
Posts: 18
Yes - we used it for parts to rebuild G-BAFD which had been dismantled and shoved into the corner by BCal. G-BAFD did some good work for us in general charter, being one of very few twin-engined helicopters available at that time. The company passed out of our hands but struggled and died under the new owners.
jpinx is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 23rd Mar 2013, 13:05
  #1894 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: England
Posts: 1,249
Hi J

Is that G-AZOM you are referring to?
If so I remember BAFD in the hangar at Bourn prior to purchase having been paint stripped and abandoned.
If I remember correctly it was purchased for an absolute knock down price (under 50K).

Last edited by ericferret; 23rd Mar 2013 at 13:08.
ericferret is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 23rd Mar 2013, 23:11
  #1895 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: In the air with luck
Posts: 979
Hiller Owner Forum
A lot of Hillier photos

Last edited by 500e; 23rd Mar 2013 at 23:12.
500e is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 27th Mar 2013, 10:09
  #1896 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Milano, Italia
Posts: 2,425


The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston, Massachusetts, released the following photos of John F. Kennedy Jr. (also known as John John) on Monday:









The photos were taken at Camp David (when 'John John' was two) on 31st March 1963 and show the youngster aboard a VH-3D Sea King of Marine Helicopter Squadron One (HMX-1).

As most will know, John F. Kennedy Jr. sadly perished with his wife Caroline and sister-in-law Lauren Bessette, while flying his Piper Saratoga off the coast of Martha's Vineyard in July 1999.
Savoia is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 27th Mar 2013, 12:54
  #1897 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Milano, Italia
Posts: 2,425
Continuing the Sea King theme ..

For Geoff n' Jim:


British Caledonian Helicopters S61N G-BIMU (also known as 'Loch Fyne' - in recognition of those crews who enjoyed a wee tipple of the fermented grapes) on finals at Aberdeen's Dyce Airport on 16th September 1984 (Photo: Derek Ferguson)
Savoia is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 27th Mar 2013, 21:40
  #1898 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: around and about
Age: 66
Posts: 280
Skeeter G-SARO

That's my girl! . Total rebuild (DESPITE CAA's input, Mr Herman, since you ask) in 1976, Blackpool. Since it was only to be a permit we did it my way . I took 39lbs of redundant wiring out of her, put a motor-bike battery in the old HUGE battery case, and replaced the counterbalance weights on the t'boom with balsa wood........

I also used a Chadwick to calibrate a chart for her and remove all traces of stick-stir, and scrubbed round the 25hr greasing of the M/R head (which only finished off the friction dampers up there, anyway!).

Flew all over the place until its owner unfortunately went to the big-bar-in-the-sky a few years ago. And then, due uninspectable internal corrosion problems to MRB steel spars, the type was grounded.

Sad but a fact of life,I think she maybe either at Weston s'mare or at Middle Wallop.

Some machine though, flew like a ding-bat; not bad for a 1954 build aircraft (just left a slick of W80 across UK from an un-fixable leak at the primary g'box - like all Skeeters did)

RIP old lady, you did me proud. I have a cherished photo of you airborne over the Black Isle - VFR
vfr440 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 28th Mar 2013, 07:34
  #1899 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 869
Vfr440.........Skeeter G-SARO is actually at the Yorkshire Air Museum but the Helicopter Museum has got four spare airframes if you fancy rebuilding another one !
A couple of the volunteers have also just finished rebuilding one of the Gypsy Major engines to put on show alongside the displayed Skeeter.when you see the size and weight of the engine you understand why the Skeeter struggled to get airborne in a German summer!
heli1 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 28th Mar 2013, 14:07
  #1900 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: West Sussex
Posts: 29
Agaricus bisporus

I remember seeing G-STOX in the stated colours many years ago when I was a weee 13 year old lad. If my memory serves me correct it was owned by 2 city guys, based and hangered with Aeromega Helicopters when at Stapleford Aerodrome. Seeing the photo brought back many happy and fond memories.

Last edited by SECRET SERVICE; 28th Mar 2013 at 14:08.
SECRET SERVICE is offline  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service