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Scotia

Old 18th May 2001, 00:24
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COLLECTIVE FRICTION
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ANY TRUTH IN THE RUMOUR THAT SCOTIA HAVE JUST BEEN GIVEN A BIG PAY HIKE ( THE WORKFORCE THAT IS )AND A GENEROUS CHANGE IN THEIR ROSTOR ?
 
Old 18th May 2001, 00:46
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Rameses III
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I'd heard a figure of around 20% but it could just be one of the many rumours flying around. But if it is true watch the stampede of pilots across the runway at Aberdeen. It's amazing that with Scotia being paid 10% more than Bristows already that more people haven't left. I think many pilots in BHL are waiting to see the result of this years payrise before making that move. Of course both companies are still losing pilots to the fixed wing world.

However, with Bristow painting aircraft blue, senior directors selling their shares in OLOG and continuous talk of "can't afford a big payrise" then perhaps there is a much bigger agenda here.

The Truth is Out There!
 
Old 18th May 2001, 15:35
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NRDK
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Great rumour, if it's true then the management at Bristow's must be worried that their 'magical' pay review won't satisfy the work force in light of Scotia's already better pay & conditions. They can kiss goodbye to a few more pilots in the near future and in the long term any hopes of the 'Jigsaw' Offshore SAR and even the long term mainland SAR contract, not to mention being unable to crew present oil contracts

In fact, if indeed the management is so 'blinkered' and perhaps they aren't if they are selling OLOG shares off as mentioned by Rameses III. Then perhaps it's true the hidden agenda is the end of Britow's and the start of an even larger CHC company!. (Watch the Oil companies cry 'Monopoly').

After all, spending lot's of money on a new company image just before you sell it off is an old military tactic. A sure fire sign of the end. I'm sure those loyal BHL pilots, crewmen and support staff are watching carefully to see if the loyalty shown over many years will be justly rewarded with an ample pay and conditions award. Good luck….you deserve it. If not I'll see you at Scotia in the near future.
 
Old 18th May 2001, 17:01
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Thanks for the reply chaps. Still nothing concrete from a Scotia driver. The silence is deafening !
 
Old 19th May 2001, 13:48
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Special 25
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I'm with CF here - Are there any Scotia pilots reading this ?

If so, have you been offered a 2 week on / 2 week off roster or the option of a 5 - 2 / 5 - 9 roster as the rumours seem to be suggesting ?

To many theories in Aberdeen and not enough solid information. Thanks to anyone who can make things a bit more concrete !!
 
Old 19th May 2001, 22:43
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tell
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4% and 8/6....I think!
 
Old 20th May 2001, 00:27
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MaxNg
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Puma Mk1 drivers have the option of 4/3 or 8/6 with 16 days leave, Mk11 Drivers are on a 5/2 5/3 7/6 roster with 29 days leave meaning both groups get 192 days off per annum, and they have just recieved the second part of the two year pay deal brokered by BALPA worth 4.2% this term. however I understand that ther is a patition going around calling on its members to press for more cash or face industrial action, its going to get interesting over the next few weeks as there are rumours of more resignations to come this at a time when the company is looking to recruit 30 more pilots over the next 6 months. The local press reports that oil companies are already taking the hint and Tallisman have gone from ADhoc to sole use on two Mk1's this will have a domino effect as the oil companies start to see an even bigger drop in availability especially as drilling work is increasing and the workforce are topping out on hours and the summer peaks have yet to bite.

A one off increase of 10,000 per capt. and then the written agreement of 10% for the next three years would go some way to redress the situation and stop the loss of experienced crew.


 
Old 20th May 2001, 01:23
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COLLECTIVE FRICTION
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Thanks for the info . If nothing else , this thread has put the wind up some of the grownups on the other side of the runway .I don't care what sort of cunning plan the " Big two " on the other side of the Atlantic have up thier sleeves , they're going to have to develope some pretty swept up auto pilots to keep the fleet off the ground once all the "loyal employees " foxtrot oscar to fixed wing.

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BOHICA
 
Old 21st May 2001, 19:28
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chopperman
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The 8/6, 4/3 roster implementation has been put back by management until November, (more likely next year), as Scotia do not have enough pilots to make it work. As for a big pay rise, we will just have to wait and see, the workforce know nothing as yet.
With regard to pilots moving across the runway, I believe that there is a no poaching agreement in force between the two companies. Perhaps any Bristow pilot who has approached Scotia would like to comment.

Chopperman.
 
Old 21st May 2001, 22:21
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roundwego
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Scotia management think they will keep pilots by giving a few extra days off in the year. The new roster looks great until you see they have taken most of the annual leave entitlement and rostered them as "extra days off".
They must get the message that the only thing that is going to keep pilots is to give a respectable salary. I for one would not be staying on the North Sea if i was a 30 yr old. the fixed wing earning potential is so much greater.
 
Old 22nd May 2001, 01:17
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DragDamper
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I think not, plenty of those that I speak to appreciate the North Sea work is unique, and would happily stay if the quality of life was good. Yes more pay improves that, but more time off and less tiring work routine with some stability to days and hours worked is more attractive to many. However you look at rostering and leave, at the end of the day it is how many days off that can be used to their full that counts for me.
 
Old 22nd May 2001, 01:38
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I don't see how an increase in time off can solve the problems we are having.Money is the only thing that will help.An increase in our salaries will lead to the retention of experienced aircrew and recruitment of new ones.I like MaxNg's sums ! A stable workforce would ( I think ) naturally lead to a more stable rostor.
PS......I thought the latest Bristow/Balpa CC newsletter was damn good.....keep it up.

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BOHICA
 
Old 22nd May 2001, 02:47
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Shouting Rad-Alt
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What is the current salary for the crewmen? and are they suffering similar problems with retention etc?
 
Old 22nd May 2001, 14:30
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Variable Load
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With all the talk about guys going fixed wing can anyone actually say how many have left the industry in the last twelve months? Out of a combined UK N Sea workforce of about 450 (my guess!) I suspect we are talking a very small percentage. It's a great headline, but I don't think the reality backs it up. I can only remember about 4 or 5 from Scotia. That kind of number isn't going to result in a massive shift in pay rates.

I like the idea of more time off 'cos it gives me more opportunity to get my fixed wing hours

More money would, of course, be a bonus but I live in the real world.

I'm now waiting for the bullets to start flying.
 
Old 22nd May 2001, 16:26
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HOGE
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Variable Load, the problem is that the people leaving are all from the middle of the workforce. There goes all that experience, so what happens when all the retirements kick in, and there's no one to replace them?

The other problem is how many are waiting to go fixed wing?
 
Old 22nd May 2001, 19:57
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roundwego
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The problem is not only the loss of experience to the fixed wing world, but also the lack of quality material to recruit. With few exeptions, the new blood coming into the offshore market are very inexperienced and have little possibility of reaching command quality for many years. The large number of leavers over the next few years is going to cause the industry to promote too soon with a consequent downturn in safety......And then there are those foreign pilots who are waiting in the wings to work for 20 roubles a month!
 
Old 23rd May 2001, 01:29
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COLLECTIVE FRICTION
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Lots
 
Old 23rd May 2001, 17:17
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Random Background Noise
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Roundwego
What hours, experience and qualifications in your opinion, makes a person, "quality material to recruit". Also, what sort of $$$ can a new co-pilot expect to earn. I must warn you I'm a foriegner who is thinking about comming over to see how the other half do it but I certainly wouldn't work for a penny less than the going rate.
 
Old 24th May 2001, 00:08
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roundwego
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Hello Random Background Noise

There has to be the ability to balance the recruitment requirement. A low time, newly qualified pilot can earn quite a respectable wage within two to three years – probably more than a similarly qualified fixed wing pilot. This is reasonable due to the high cost of buying a CPL/H. When you get to the 3000hr experienced ex military pilot or a civilian who has built up a variety of P1 experience doing lots of different jobs, the North Sea is not so attractive. A senior North Sea line pilot is earning in the order of 50 - 55k. His equivalent in fixed wing will be able to earn 80k+. (Any FW readers please correct if necessary). This is particularly galling when one considers the harsher environment in which the North Sea pilot has to operate and the increased hazards of the job. How many pilots have come from the fixed wing world to helicopters as a career advancement – none that I know.

As to my previous reference to foreign pilots, watch this space. The employers would rather bring in labour from low salary base countries rather than look to the long term problem of retention of experienced UK pilots. Look at the Health Service – rather than paying an appropriate rate to attract and retain sufficient UK staff, foreign doctors and nurses have been brought in. It is not uncommon to find oneself face to face with a foreign doctor with whom one can hardly communicate due to language problems. This is not a reflection of the competence of “foreign” practitioners. I would be equally “foreign” if I was to try and work for a local firm overseas.

Quality and safety will suffer if the situation is allowed to deteriorate further.


[This message has been edited by roundwego (edited 23 May 2001).]
 
Old 24th May 2001, 16:45
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DragDamper
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Who said only 4 or 5 people have left Scotia for fixed wing? I can think of two months last year when around 7 left each month. OK maybe it was not all for fixed wing, but where they go doesn't matter it is the numbers that are the problem. Even worse if it is not to FW, at least we understand why they go there, it is more worrying when people just want out.
 

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