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ATPL training Funding

Old 16th Mar 2019, 17:09
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Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: United Kingdom
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ATPL training Funding

Iím 17 years old and just about to finish my final year at sixth form. Iíve been looking everywhere for loans etc. I have only came across a few things, Pegasus finance and remortgage. Unfortunately, Iím quite unprivileged and my mum and dad are separated. Asking my dad to remortgage would be an option but I wouldnít be able to get more than £60,000. Iím not too sure if heís be willing to do that either. Does anyone know of any funding options within the UK. The RAF is an option but itís very rare to be accepted for the pilot training course. Also, the school Iím looking at currently FLYBYSCHOOL. I wondered if anyone could give me any reviews on it.
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Old 16th Mar 2019, 21:09
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Join Date: Jan 2018
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Go modular. Work and save and do your PPL and ATPL theory in distance learning. With hard work and dedication, it can be done. Many of us did, many more will do.
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Old 17th Mar 2019, 10:18
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Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Aviation Street 72
Age: 39
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Modular training

I double what Banana Joe said. You are very young, try first for a ppl or gliding scholarship and stick to a club. Get a job or/and a degree, work hard, save enough, go modular. Did about the same (except I was 28 yo). No regrets.
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Old 17th Mar 2019, 12:41
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Join Date: Jul 2017
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Build a career for yourself first, you have to start somewhere so start off stacking shelves in Tesco or something and keep looking to get a better paying job while saving money for training

Please don't go down the road of bank loans as if you need a loan to fund the training then you can't afford the training to begin with and when interest payments come back and you still have no pilot job you risk declaring bankrupt and airlines to background checks on your finances etc etc

Set yourself a target of saving for a PPL first or go down the military route, military pays well in the UK and you can fly so you sort of tick two boxes at once
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Old 18th Mar 2019, 00:23
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You basically want to earn the maximum amount of cash in the minimum amount of time whilst having something which will be a reasonable backup should the pilot training plan not work out (medical, unable to get a flying job etc.).

If I could go back to when I was 17, I'd seriously consider railway signalling as a career. It's safety-critical shift work, it pays well from day one, there's progression opportunities and a good pension. Merchant Navy is perhaps another good pick, so long as you join directly with a sponsoring company. You could study the theory exams whilst at sea and do the flying during the two-three month blocks at home.
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Old 18th Mar 2019, 09:06
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Join Date: Mar 2018
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I have no idea where you can get your money from. But you can do your training in Poland for example. For £42,000 you will get everything ( PPL(A) + nVFR + 100 hours PIC + MEP(L) + ME/IR + CPL + JOC/MCC) PLUS an FI rating and a guaranteed job as FI (ofc. if you are good enough to pass all the ratings including FI rating) so while you wait for the airlines you build your hours and get paid for it. Its not absolutely necessary to use more than £60,000 on training, for example at the flight school I am doing my 0-ATPL+FI all the instructors who instructed me in 2018 and wanted to get into the airlines got a job already in 2018 no one waited more than a year. So it looks like currently there is no reason to pay a ton of money for the flight school.
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Old 18th Mar 2019, 21:33
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The military route would be hard since there selection process only lets in 3/50 Pilots. Also, I am slightly colour blind meaning I will probably not be accepted into the RAF especially as a pilot.
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Old 18th Mar 2019, 21:35
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£42,000 is still a lot for someone like me. Also, its not just £42,000 you have to take into the account of travel, living expenses and leisure. Basic needs of life. You're looking at a minimum of £60,000.
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Old 19th Mar 2019, 09:35
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Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: Prague
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I have to agree with others. It would be best if you go modular. Maybe you will not have that much ground studies and it will take maybe a bit longer but you will be able to do that.
Since you do your training only once in your life it is hard to compare but I would really recomend you to go to Eastern Europe, it will be cheaper for you.
Honestly, you really do not need that much money for yourself. We had (it is still there) a little house for pilots in training just on the airport. You had to pay for that but it was really cheap, just for pilots or people from aviation, quite comfy, there was everything you need. Bed, internet, bathroom, kitchen. It was just 1 km walking on taxiway to hangar.

Find a job, aviation industry related job, ramp agent or something. Maybe money are bad but you will be in business. Or something well paid, it is up to you. Work a lot, live cheap, save money. Do your PPL from your salary and savings. Start ATPL theory, keep working, do your time building and when it is time, go for loan, take money, take time off and go do CPL, IFR etc.
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Old 19th Mar 2019, 13:30
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Join Date: Sep 2007
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Pilotkye, its not what you want to hear, but study hard go to University, enjoy it get a decent job.
Build some equity, then and only then start training, it can be done Modular, £60K is not enough, I would have thought nearer £100,000. In fact I spent much much more.
If it helps, I got the bug at age 11, flying to Toyko over the pole, 18 hours on a JAL 747-100/200 in 1981. I spent some time in the flight deck the guest of the flight crew. When I was 16 I had a lesson, at Barton in Manchester, I did not go to uni and got on with my life. When I was in my early 30's I started my PPL, it developed into what I have now.
I got my first job when I was 37
There are no shortcuts, it is long and arduous, just don't expect a quick fix. You will be a better pilot for it.
Good Luck
ford cortina is offline  
Old 19th Mar 2019, 13:45
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Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: IOM
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From personal experience, I have a few suggestions for you.

1. Consider very carefully whether you would want to put the financial pressure of funding your training onto your parents. Would they be able to cope if something went wrong and you couldn't complete training, meaning they have to potentially re-mortgage houses etc.? Unless you have thought through every possible outcome I would avoid this.
2. Get yourself into a well-paid career and save every penny. Some great ideas above already. However even the average office job will give you the opportunity to work and save enough over several years. Yes, several years! It may take a while, but after starting saving when I was 21 I am now 30 and have just been able to fund my CPL, MEIR etc.
3. Take the modular route. This will save you thousands of pounds and quite frankly be a great life experience. I have had a great time training over the past few years. My net spend will be around the £60k mark by the time I am finished, if not slightly over due to the APS MCC requirement.
4. If you're good with computers & Excel, set up a budget calculator and plan out every expense and how much you expect to be able to put aside until you reach £60k saved. This will mean that, like me, holidays become one of the first things that get cut. Nights out / trips are budgeted for but keep these within limits - I would recommend keeping a good social life though as all work and no play is not great for the mental psyche :o)
5. If you do need to borrow money to fund the courses, consider a personal (unsecured) bank loan. After considering all the options I was able to obtain a loan for £24,500 over seven years with a very reasonable APR %. Factor your repayments into your budget calculator to make sure you can afford the repayments if you need to return to a back up career path.
6. Don't scrimp on your flying courses. Do not select the cheapest course provider. Do your research, visit schools, speak to students (past and present) and find out exactly what kind of service you are paying for. PPRuNe has plenty of recommendations in terms of good modular schools in the UK and abroad.
7. This route will not be easy, and it will take a while to achieve. However, if you can show you are motivated enough to commit to this route and have met all the challenges along the way, then your desire to succeed should shine through in the airline interview stage. Don't give up on it.
8. Lastly, medicals. The single most horrifying and nerve-wracking part of the whole process! If you can't hold and maintain a Class 1 licence, there's no point going any further. Read up on the medical requirements and make sure you can meet them. The UK Civil Aviation Authority website is a good place to read up on medical requirements.

Hopefully this helps in some way. Good luck!
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Old 19th Mar 2019, 13:51
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£60K is not enough? For a modular route? Actually for £100,000 you can get the whole 0+ATPL+FI PLUS your own (used) Cessna 172 and still have money left. I do not know where people get their prices from but in Poland it cost £42,000 for 0 - ATPL + FI. As for the cost of living I imagined people who are short on cash do not need to live 2 years in luxury. In Poland renting a flat is less than £400 per month even in Warszawa. So using more than £1,000 per month in Poland means you eat at restaurant every day and drive a taxi everywhere if you live alone. The prices are definitely not like in UK or Norway etc.
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Old 19th Mar 2019, 14:50
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Join Date: Mar 2019
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Originally Posted by KT1988 View Post
£60K is not enough? For a modular route? Actually for £100,000 you can get the whole 0+ATPL+FI PLUS your own (used) Cessna 172 and still have money left. I do not know where people get their prices from but in Poland it cost £42,000 for 0 - ATPL + FI. As for the cost of living I imagined people who are short on cash do not need to live 2 years in luxury. In Poland renting a flat is less than £400 per month even in Warszawa. So using more than £1,000 per month in Poland means you eat at restaurant every day and drive a taxi everywhere if you live alone. The prices are definitely not like in UK or Norway etc.
They live in Western Europe. There they get those prices and I would say they have higher living standard.
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Old 19th Mar 2019, 14:56
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Join Date: Sep 2007
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KT1988, I speak from experience. I have no doubt that it is possible to obtain a fATPL for less , but of course that does depend on first time passes in everything.
When you are spending £1000 per day (2 hours flying), doing your multi engine IR, the costs soon add up.
Best of luck with your ground school KT
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Old 19th Mar 2019, 16:33
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@ford cortina: The whole program cost £42,000 with an FI rating and job guarantee as FI (if you are good enough ofc. to pass the FI course before the official exam). As for DA-42 (or Piper Seneca III (tecnam at some other schools) whichever you prefer) time its more like 3+ extra hours in Poland for £1000, 1 hour cost 1500 PLN.

Thanks, as for the groundschool its learning by Bristol with help from Aviation Exam and other question banks. Then you choose when you want to take the exams you just need to do all 14 in 6 sessions (1 session is 9 exam days and 2 weeks of time). So its the difference between integrated and modular that you have to learn the theory (except for theory needed for practical flying that is being taught and examined very well at the school) working mostly on your own. But thats definitely worth £58,000 cheaper price. All the flight training is just as if it was integrated and you get FI + MCC/JOC as bonus (not all integrated courses got MCC/JOC included, either way I still want to spend extra on VA APS MCC since I believe its the most important part for the airlines and not how you learned the basic stuff). And you can actually finish quicker than the integrated course it all depends on how fast you manage to learn and pass the ATPL theory exams.
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Old 22nd Mar 2019, 15:13
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Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: London
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Don't forget the chances are you may have to contribute towards some, or all, of a type rating at the end of your training too. A budget of £60k seems ambitious to me.
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Old 26th Mar 2019, 19:20
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Originally Posted by Northern Monkey View Post
Don't forget the chances are you may have to contribute towards some, or all, of a type rating at the end of your training too. A budget of £60k seems ambitious to me.
Type rating is included in that cost. This is the cost of the Wizz Air Cadet Course at BAA.
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Old 27th Mar 2019, 00:09
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You've mentioned you're slightly colour blind. If I were you I'd get your 1st class medical before you start worrying about the cost of flight training.
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Old 27th Mar 2019, 02:37
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Originally Posted by Chris the Robot View Post
You basically want to earn the maximum amount of cash in the minimum amount of time whilst having something which will be a reasonable backup should the pilot training plan not work out (medical, unable to get a flying job etc.).

If I could go back to when I was 17, I'd seriously consider railway signalling as a career. It's safety-critical shift work, it pays well from day one, there's progression opportunities and a good pension. Merchant Navy is perhaps another good pick, so long as you join directly with a sponsoring company. You could study the theory exams whilst at sea and do the flying during the two-three month blocks at home.
Iím doing exactly what Chris said, I work at sea for 8 weeks save up a load of money and go home for 8 weeks. I did my PPL practical intensively during the 8 weeks at home and now have started my ATPL distance learning, you donít even need the internet. Give it some thought but itís not for everyone- it is however quick, tax free cash and a way to travel.
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Old 27th Mar 2019, 08:18
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Originally Posted by TryingToAvoidCBs View Post
You've mentioned you're slightly colour blind. If I were you I'd get your 1st class medical before you start worrying about the cost of flight training.
Going to get a medical when I leave sixth form.
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