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Personality test - what's the deal?

Old 18th May 2018, 09:14
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Personality test - what's the deal?

Hello.

I've passed my first assesment for an ATPL integrated course. The first one consisted of Compass test, personal interview and personality test. I've passed the compass, the people at the interview seemed to like me, but the personality test results worry me a little bit. Scored low in some areas, high in others. Sociability was the highest. The report said that some personality traits of mine/or lack thereof are a cause of serious concerns.

However, I've been anounced that I've been selected for the second stage of recruitment, but I'm still somewhat worried.

Is the personality profile result a make-or-break for pilots? How much do they take it into account? Is it detrimental?

Thanks.
Lawgeenoo is offline  
Old 19th May 2018, 07:30
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de minimus non curat lex
 
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Without specific details it is not really possible to answer your Q.
Your age / life experience are important factors........
Serious concern ~ immature due young age?

Do you consider yourself a TEAM PLAYER, or is it all Me Me Me?
As CRM is a critical part of aviation, your personality is crucial if you are going to fit in.

If you are self funding, just be aware that the ATO is a business out to make money.
parkfell is offline  
Old 19th May 2018, 09:29
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Big tip: Don't try to be anything other than yourself. Actors get this all the time when casting - a rejection is nothing personal. They are just looking for what they need.

Phil
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Old 19th May 2018, 11:09
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To see if you are the right fit to be aircrew and competent to be in charge of an aircraft & pax. Not to have psychotic tendencies!
GLIDER 90 is offline  
Old 19th May 2018, 11:55
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Originally Posted by parkfell View Post
Without specific details it is not really possible to answer your Q.
Your age / life experience are important factors........
Serious concern ~ immature due young age?

Do you consider yourself a TEAM PLAYER, or is it all Me Me Me?
As CRM is a critical part of aviation, your personality is crucial if you are going to fit in.

If you are self funding, just be aware that the ATO is a business out to make money.
It wasn't related to maturity. And yes, I am a team person.

Well my question was, if i've been recalled for the second assesment, that means I've passed everything, including personality test, right?
Lawgeenoo is offline  
Old 19th May 2018, 17:41
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You might have passed the first of many hurdles but that would not stop them as assessing you as a “training risk”.
And just depending what has been identified as SERIOUS ISSUES might be their way of saying, yes you might achieve licence issue, but you are potentially unemployable due to the “issues”??

The ATO exists as a business to make profit and return dividends to the shareholders.

You as the potential customer must be fully aware of the coded messages made by the ATO.

Take the 16PF test independently with a qualified psychologist for a second opinion.
You must be able to pass the “beer test” comfortably.

Last edited by uncle dickie; 19th May 2018 at 18:02.
uncle dickie is offline  
Old 19th May 2018, 18:06
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Is the personality profile result a make-or-break for pilots?
Don’t have a scooby for about the modern formal “test”, but personality can be a big issue with recruiters....aside from the technical stuff and pilot competences a pilot recruiter will be asking themselves the question: “ would I be happy being in close proximity to and sharing a flight deck with this individual for a working day”, I’m guessing that’s possibly similar the “beer test” uncle dickie is referring to (“would I happily share a beer after work with this man or woman”).
wiggy is offline  
Old 19th May 2018, 18:25
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Personality tests are a load of garbage in my opinion. I would be much more concerned about your ability to pass the exams, competently operate the aircraft, are you resilient enough to get through the arduous training course. Also, could you handle the pressures of being a pilot, early mornings, late nights, time zones, corporate pressures, being rushed, one thing after another going wrong all day......?

Thankfully, the world is full of different personalities and we aren't all the same, so you can't expect pilots to all have the same personality. Most experienced Captains should be able to separate the personalities that will fit and won't fit at the interview stage.... trying telling that to Human Remains though! A good way to figure out if you've got the personality, along with many other necessary attributes; is to find an experienced PPL instructor and learn to fly.
MaverickPrime is offline  
Old 19th May 2018, 19:26
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You can have a crap attitude when you start your training but if you are open minded and willing to adapt then you can make it as an airline pilot

Nobody is perfect and we all have some flaws but recognising this and working on self improvement will go along way for your career and not just for Aviation
Negan is offline  
Old 19th May 2018, 20:05
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Don't put too much emphasis on any form of personality or aptitude test.
In my 31 years of flying,i have come across all sorts,some of whom i would never expect to be in charge of an airliner,quite alarming really.
Aviation,although highly regulated,has the same cross section of humanity as any other profession.
Total professionals,extroverts,introverts,religious zelots,aetheists,alcoholics,manic depressives,you name them,you will meet them.
The one trait you will need is to be tolerant and remain calm,when a colleague is driving you to distraction.
If you work for a major outfit,chances are you will never fly with them again,or at least for a few years.
Baltic Skies is offline  
Old 20th May 2018, 13:17
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Wiggy has got it spot on: would you still want to go for a “beer” after work?
And with the influence of HR these days, you can expect psychometric testing as part of the recruitment process.
Unfortunately HR have made some real howlers, and the pilot workforce are having to cope with some quite unsuitable individuals. Ultimately it is going to have to cost the airlines money before the tide turns and pilots involved with recruitment have the casting vote, not HR. As very few HR have been up the sharp end, there assessments are based largely on theoretical criteria. Or am I being to harsh?
uncle dickie is offline  
Old 20th May 2018, 14:47
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Originally Posted by uncle dickie View Post
Or am I being to harsh?
You are not being even harsh enough in my opinion
Banana Joe is offline  
Old 21st May 2018, 20:21
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Some of these threads are comedy gold
jamesgrainge is offline  
Old 22nd May 2018, 09:13
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Originally Posted by Baltic Skies View Post
Don't put too much emphasis on any form of personality or aptitude test.
In my 31 years of flying,i have come across all sorts,some of whom i would never expect to be in charge of an airliner,quite alarming really.
Aviation,although highly regulated,has the same cross section of humanity as any other profession.
Total professionals,extroverts,introverts,religious zelots,aetheists,alcoholics,manic depressives,you name them,you will meet them.
The one trait you will need is to be tolerant and remain calm,when a colleague is driving you to distraction.
If you work for a major outfit,chances are you will never fly with them again,or at least for a few years.
I see a lot of OCD and evidence of on spectrum higher functioning disorders in the flight deck too. At times, it actually makes us quite good at the job, as long as it doesn't get in the way of the interpersonal skills element of the job.

Alcoholism, yes, although much less now than 15 years ago. Introvert/extrovert thing can be disguised with a decent awareness for routine operation - BUT, here's the but, from what I have seen, you cant hide your highly stressed reversionary type.

I think this is what British Airways and those completing extended simulator checks at interview are getting at. A quick ILS and engine failure, you don't get to see that.

I would say try and think about how you would respond in a couple of multi crew aviation situations, what your natural reaction would be and how, if this is a negative trait, how you will firstly recognise it (open feedback from crew is essential here) and how you will mitigate it. The one big rule of CRM is that safe operation of the task is EVERYTHING. Personal differences, beliefs, cultural differences, matter not a jot. You let that shizzle get into the flight deck, you are being highly unprofessional and letting the 200+ paying punters behind you down. If it's not safety related, I generally will not press the flesh in the cockpit, but will make a point of bringing up and discussing post flight debrief. That again is your job. Don't ever let an experienced captain fly you into a hillside or run you out of fuel. Its been done before, it will be done again and its your job as an employee and professional to prevent it.
VinRouge is offline  
Old 22nd May 2018, 14:28
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Being a safe and efficient pilot as well as having an open mind is very important to the safety of the flight

Swallow your pride if you want to be an airline pilot because ego and pride will get you no where
Negan is offline  
Old 1st Jun 2018, 09:17
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For the school all they care about is wether you have the money to pay for the flying or not . If you have the money they will be perfectly happy 😉
Getting a job later on is another story though but a lot can change during training . And recruiters make their own assesment anyway.
I wouldn't worry about it.
lasseb is offline  

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