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ATPL exams

Old 9th Dec 2013, 21:48
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ATPL exams

Having recently completed my PPL exams, I was wondering how big the jump is to ATPL level. From what I've heard, it's the sheer volume of information to digest that is the toughest part. Any information or advice would be much appreciated.
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Old 9th Dec 2013, 22:05
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ATPL exams

Yep , sheer volume is about right . It's not rocket science . You get back out results wise what you put in study wise .
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Old 9th Dec 2013, 22:17
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Definitely volume over matter. Also agree with getting out what you put in.
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Old 9th Dec 2013, 22:19
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Doing ATPL at 17 without any crazy degree of math or physic knowledge.

It's just a large volume of information to remember though, as long as you love it you won't have a problem - all of the subjects are very interesting.

Make sure it's integrated, modular is way too long.
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Old 9th Dec 2013, 23:00
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ATPL exams

Make sure you choose the correct path re integrated or modular. Ignore everyone who claims one is superior to the other.

I went modular, it suited my lifestyle and funding, and I got to choose the best schools as I saw them. Colleagues of mine have gone both ways. Deeply personal choice there!

But yes, sheer volume! Choose a good school and good luck.
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Old 10th Dec 2013, 04:03
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With respect Stefan not everyone has access to funding or guarantor to go integrated. Modular can be just as quick too. There have been people on here who have done so and saved money over integrated to pay for a TR which in this day and age many integrated people end up doing. And that's in addition to the circa 100k spent.
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Old 10th Dec 2013, 05:54
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I'm unsure as to whether he actually meant full time studying or distance learning
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Old 10th Dec 2013, 06:01
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Originally Posted by Stefan123 View Post
Doing ATPL at 17 without any crazy degree of math or physic knowledge.

It's just a large volume of information to remember though, as long as you love it you won't have a problem - all of the subjects are very interesting.

Make sure it's integrated, modular is way too long.
sadly I haven't got access to 100k, so my only option is modular; however, I am looking at doing the exams on a full time basis.

Thank you for all the responses. I just want to make sure I can cope with it. I found the PPL exams really interesting, but I've heard some people telling me it's A Level maths and physics standard. I find that difficult to believe myself.
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Old 10th Dec 2013, 07:58
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ATPL exams

I had GCSE maths. There are some equations to master, a bit of trigonometry, but you hammer these a lot in the classroom so they become second nature.

The air law is the dry stuff though!
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Old 10th Dec 2013, 08:59
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I would agree with GCSE Maths being sufficient (IMO).

I disagree with making sure to do it integrated because modular takes too long. I did everything modular and did my exams via distance learning, when I then did my practical training at what is a primarily integrated school, I found that they were spending longer doing the exams than I had. As what was said, it's all about what you put in to it.

For a reference point, I took 6 months from receiving the study material to having all the exams passed, and this includes a 1 month break over Christmas and a 1 month break after the first set of exams while waiting for results. Other people have done it quicker. Other people take longer.
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Old 10th Dec 2013, 09:47
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Nothing wrong with modular - but you MUST put the work in, whichever method you use. Some of our students are there from 8 till 8 every day and this of course is reflected in their results. These are not exams that that you can dismiss readily.
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Old 10th Dec 2013, 11:03
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Make sure it's integrated, modular is way too long.
Perhaps Stefan123 could come back and back this statement up, but I'd agree with AndoniP, I think he meant you should do a full time residential course rather than distance learning.

I would second that opinion, full time residential course gets the whole thing over in 6 months, with excellent support during the course, then it's done and you can move on with the flying. With distance learning, I've heard of people doing it in 12 months, but more often it's 18, and can just drag on to 24, 36, then you find your first exam is out of date and you have to retake it.

Of course, if Stefan123 actually meant what he said, then it's total nonsense, integrated and modular generally take just as long to get the end result, and each to their own depending on their own budget, and training goals, as to which course they choose.
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Old 10th Dec 2013, 14:43
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You can do modular in 6 months if you are organised.
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Old 10th Dec 2013, 15:21
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On an full-time course ATPL theory works out at around 7 months, it is possible, though certainly not easy do this is via distance learning also in this time but 12 months+ is more the norm.

I had a student do it 6 months last year but he had no other distractions, partners full support & fully committed to the task.

EASA ATPLs are not that academic, it's the volume of quite often irrelevant rubbish and poor standard of questions in the amount of time that is the biggest issue.
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Old 10th Dec 2013, 21:22
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Make sure it's integrated, modular is way too long.
Absolute nonsense. Check out CAE Oxford Aviation Academy and you will find out that the modular ground course is exactly as long as the ground school of the integrated course. But if you've done your research properly you should know this... I believe it's the same for other schools as well.

I'm a modular ground school student at OAA now, and it's all just top notch! Instructors are very friendly and very good, with lots of experience in aviation. I came straight out of school from my home country, and find that the ATPLs for me are a huge gap from PPL to ATPL. That said, English isn't my first language so sometimes I've struggled a bit with complicated words.

Good luck whatever you do, and make sure you do proper research!
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Old 10th Dec 2013, 21:41
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I did mine Modular with Bristol ground school. Took me about a year to do in my own time as I didn't have A-levels in Physics or Mathematics so that's why I found some bits hard. But other then that I did enjoy my time learning the topics.
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Old 11th Dec 2013, 11:12
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How did YOU study?

Hello

I'm starting ATPL groundschool next year, and one thing that is worrying me is the shire volume of information us pilots have to remember.

I was wondering if some of you guys could share some studying/revision tips and tricks that helped you nail them ATPL exams back when you were pilot cadets

For me personally, all I usually do is read, I never really make notes but I think that has to change if I want to get good grades in the exams.

Many thanks fellow pilots!
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Old 11th Dec 2013, 15:45
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Just reading won't get you through the ATPL, you must make notes of the key facts. Writing helps to get things into your subconscious where things will slowly begin to click.

Subjects like MB, GN & FP are also the more practical ones so you only really learn when you DO things. Other subjects like Air Bore is just remembering facts as best you can.

Your number one priority is to master the CRP-5 particularly on the wind side and working out TAS given IAS/Mno etc. Start doing this NOW as it will save you valuable time you can use towards other areas.

Though it might sound somewhat old-fashioned I advise my students to get some blank post/cue cards and write all the formulas (included transposing it) for each subject - there will be several.
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Old 11th Dec 2013, 16:03
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I found having a plan was the best way to study. I would agree with RichardH about mastering the Crap-5 and also that the more applied subjects come together the more you get stuck into doing examples etc, but I don't necessarily agree that you can't get through it without writing stuff down. I didn't write notes when I was studying (but did during the distance learning brush up weeks), and I found reading and re-reading when I didn't understand something to be sufficient.

It all depends on how you learn best, some learn best from writing, others learn best from reading, some by applying (I would fall into a mix of reading and applying depending on the matter) and some learn best through listening. It is up to you to find out what works for you!
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Old 12th Dec 2013, 11:53
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I didn't have the funding for OAA either, I found a ATPL integrated course abroad with everything covered for 44,000 Euro's.

There are a lot of cheap zero-ATPL in Eastern Europe with good prices.
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