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Hour Building USA - (Master thread)

Old 31st Jan 2017, 14:21
  #181 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: uk
Posts: 71
That video is amazing dunc 201.

Does anyone one know a good flight school to do time builiding near Los Angeles??. I need to build just under 90 hours towards my CPL.

Kind regards
flying free.LEVC is offline  
Old 14th May 2017, 13:51
  #182 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 57
Hey all,

I'm heading to Florida for my hour building in June and I've received my certificate of validation from the FAA for conversion of my UK EASA PPL to an FAA one. My understanding was that I now had to go to my FSDO (Orlando) with an appointment and to be issued with the temporary licence. However, I called them up asking for an appointment and the lady on the phone had no idea what I was asking for.

So what do I need to do?

Do I get a flight test with an international examiner THEN go to the FSDO? Or what exactly do I need to do from here to actually fly solo/PIC in Florida?

Thanks for all help!

EDIT: On a different note: What GoPro mounts are recommended to take videos and photos of the hour building? I see a lot of videos from behind the pilot seats looking out and I cannot think of any way to actually achieve this!
Locarno is offline  
Old 15th May 2017, 14:22
  #183 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: London
Posts: 522
Locarno,

The Orlando FSDO has farmed this job out to the local Designated Pilot Examiners. There's one at Jack Brown's in Winter Haven who charges about $50 for a twenty minute process of filling in forms. There is an FAA database of DPEs here. Use FAA office "SO15" for the Orlando FSDO region.

Prior to acting as pilot in command you must complete a flight review (14 CFR 61.56) with a US-certificated flight instructor. The short FAA guide for instructors, Conducting an Effective Flight Review, might be of interest. The instructor conducting the review will expect you to be acquainted with the flight rules in subpart B of Part 91.
selfin is offline  
Old 15th May 2017, 15:17
  #184 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Tightwad Hill
Posts: 32
I did my EASA PPL in San Diego and decided to do hour building in the same region since I was already pretty familiar with that environment. I looked around a lot before deciding and in the end decided to become a member with Plus One Flyers (http://www.plusoneflyers.org/), who run ops at four different fields in the San Diego area. They do not own their own aircraft, rather individuals rent their planes through them using their platform.

There are a ton of different planes. I choose a great, newly refurbished PA28 Archer (180hp) with a Garmin 430 stack, digital fuel monitoring, etc. The price was 115 USD (wet) per hour and I managed to squeeze that down by 10% agreeing to fly at least 50 hours in my month. In the end I logged close to 90 hours in that time, flying to some great locations (Las Vegas, Phoenix, San Francisco, Los Angeles...).

The One Plus organisation is very professional, they even have on-call instructors around the clock that you call if you have any questions regarding safety. You pay 30 USD a month for membership.

I had a EASA PPL and did some paperwork through the FAA website. I booked a meeting at the local FAA office and did a very brief interview with them, basically to check that my language skills was proper enough. I then got a 90-day paper slip (and my FAA card was sent to my adress in Sweden a few weeks later). This license is a piggyback-type, meaning that I have to have a valid EASA at all times to back it up.

I came back after a month, a much better pilot thanks to the challenging environment (Class B, a lot of traffic) and the amazing scenery.

Here's a video summing up that month of flying: https://youtu.be/nxDbVjl8q6A
FarewellFire is offline  
Old 15th May 2017, 21:54
  #185 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Oahu
Posts: 105
Hi Farewellfire what school did you go in san diego to do you easa ppl?
r10bbr is offline  
Old 16th May 2017, 18:34
  #186 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Traveling
Posts: 19
Guys, I've searched a lot but couldn't find much about Hour building with Flying academy in USA.
Anyone who has done it recently could share some thoughts?

I'm thinking about to do it with Airplanes4rent, but Flying academy is an option. Apart most of the questions about them, one thing was different in their website. They say you need a FAA Medical class 2. In other websites and even here in the forum I learned that with a license like the one I hold, EASA UK CAA PPL, you could just convert license and medical, go to the FSDO when you get there and they would print the license. Or should I get an FAA medical anyway?
horus23 is offline  
Old 17th May 2017, 00:47
  #187 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: London
Posts: 522
Horus,

See 14 CFR 61.75(b)(4).
selfin is offline  
Old 17th May 2017, 04:42
  #188 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Traveling
Posts: 19
Thanks selfin, so there's no need for a FAA medical if you hold one from the country which issued your license.

Another question just came up:
All the hours that you log in USA as PIC, not P1 and not dual for the biannual, will count 100% for EASA correct? Is there anything that is recommended to have in order not to have problems to prove the hours you've flown?
I read that it was just a signature of the renter and a stamp would be it. So having those can I have peace of mind when I go to start my IR and CPL back to Europe?

Cheers
horus23 is offline  
Old 17th May 2017, 15:29
  #189 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: London
Posts: 522
Horus,

Yes, however if your non-US medical certificate expires then you may obtain an FAA one.

Not all logged pilot-in-command time is deemed as such by EASA which only credits you for pilot-in-command time when you were the acting pilot-in-command. EASA treats training time received from an instructor as dual.

Any dual time received from a US-certificated flight instructor should be countersigned in your logbook. If you are not certain about the distinction between US and EU logging rules then forward a copy of the logbook to the prospective EASA training organisation for an assessment.
selfin is offline  
Old 6th Jun 2017, 18:00
  #190 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Oahu
Posts: 105
what school did you do your easa ppl farewellfire?
r10bbr is offline  
Old 10th Jun 2017, 14:36
  #191 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: LONDON
Posts: 12
Flying in Arizona

Hi guys and girls,

Could anyone give me a bit of advice about the heat in Arizona in summer?
I've got some time off in July/Aug and really fancy going out to chandler air service to do some hour building. I haven't had a holiday in years, since I've been saving for my training and am really looking forward to flying out there, hopefully having a few free days to relax too. I could go to other places or stay in the uk, now its summer, or even wait until the end of the year to go to Phoenix but if possible I would prefer to go during those months.
I've spoken to the school about the performance of their aircraft; they have told me they will cover all that when I get there. They also told me that it is hot and that it's better to fly early in the morning and get back to the pool in the afternoon to relax and plan the next days flying.
I know that it probably depends on the type of person you are and how much you feel the heat. I'm quite skinny and always cold compared to my family and friends half the time! So I love a bit of heat but 44 degrees is a different story!
I really hoped someone could give me their opinion on whether it would be ok if I'm careful or whether I'm crazy and would be miserable for the whole 3 weeks. I'm concerned with safety most of all and whether my concentration would be affected if it is too hot?

Any comments would be appreciated, whether you have done some flying in Arizona or even visited there in the summer 😅

Thanks
THE FLYING MONKEY is offline  
Old 16th Jun 2017, 03:34
  #192 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Seoul
Posts: 141
Originally Posted by button push ignored View Post

The trip started out of Knoxville Downtown Island Airport (DKX).

I met the local examiner Jerry Rasmussen a retired FBI agent, who can do all types of check rides.
Just got to give a shout out to Jerry - I did my IR and CPL with him - great guy!
dera is offline  
Old 18th Jun 2017, 14:50
  #193 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: LED
Posts: 2
Greetings,
I am a foreign student, holder of FAA CPL+IR+ME 250h+ TT
Looking for the person - holder of FAA+IR license and necessary docs, from any place/ location (local or international), who has plans and able to go to US for time building (autumn/ winter 2017, timing is subject for discussion as well). Need to build 250h (Safety Pilot/ Foggles, sharing cost 50/50. It will take approximately 270-280h net time to log 250 PIC for each one).
Choice of state/ place is formed by: flying hour price, airport specifics (non-towered prefered), local weather specifics, 100LL, transportation options and housing.
At the moment gathering info about available options (SEL: from С-172, PA-28 etc.). Do expect to fit in 2 months approx., flying almost daily, switching planes due to maintenance.
Anyone who has useful information or planing to go, please type me your messages.
Short explanation about flying with/ as safety pilot:

1. AOPA ONLINE MEMBERS ONLY - AVIATION SUBJECT REPORT - LOGGING TIME: SAFETY PILOT
LOGGING TIME: SAFETY PILOT
A safety pilot is required by FAR 91.109(b) when the other pilot is "under the hood."
The safety pilot:
Must be at least a private pilot. (FAR 91.109[b][1])
Must hold the category and class ratings (airplane, single-engine land) for the aircraft flown. (FAR 91.109[b][1])
Must have a current medical. As a required flight crewmember, the safety pilot must have a current medical certificate. (FAR 61.3[c])
Must occupy the other control seat (normally, although not required, the right or "copilot's" seat). (FAR 91.109[b][1])
Safety pilot.
Pilot-in-command time may be logged if acting as PIC.
The two pilots must agree that the safety pilot is the acting PIC.
PIC time may be logged only while the other pilot is "under-the-hood."
PIC time may be logged because FAR 61.51(e)(1)(iii) allows certificated pilots to log PIC when acting as PIC of an aircraft on which more than one pilot is required by the regulations (91.109[b]) under which the flight is conducted. A safety pilot is required for "hood work."
Second-in-command time may be logged if not acting as PIC.
Usually the case if the safety pilot cannot act as PIC. An example might be when the safety pilot is not endorsed for the particular airplane (such as in a high-performance aircraft).
SIC time may be logged because FAR 61.51(f)(2) allows a pilot to log all flight time during which he acts as second in command of an aircraft under which more than one pilot is required by the regulations (91.109[b]) under which the flight is conducted.
Other considerations
Summary of logging PIC. Both pilots may log PIC time if the safety pilot is the acting pilot in command. FAR 61.51(e) allows both the sole manipulator of the controls and the acting PIC to log PIC time.
Acting as PIC. The safety pilot should not take the role as acting PIC lightly. What if the aircraft is involved in an accident, incident, or violates a FAR?
High-performance aircraft. AOPA has a letter of interpretation that states when the safety pilot is not the acting PIC, a high-performance "sign-off" is not required. However, some FAA divisions may interpret the regulations differently. Prudence suggests that the safety pilot be endorsed for high-performance aircraft and thoroughly familiar and current in the aircraft.
Recording flight. AOPA suggests that both pilots include in their logbook the name of the other pilot. This may assist you if the FAA ever questions the logged time.
A single-yoke aircraft may not be used unless:
The single-engine airplane is equipped with a single throwover control wheel. (FAR 91.109[b][3])
The safety pilot determines the flight can be conducted safely. (FAR 91.109[b][3][i])
The person manipulating the controls is at least a private pilot who holds the category and class ratings of the aircraft being flown. (FAR 91.109[b][3][ii])

2. However, the two pilots may, prior to initiating the flight, agree that the safety pilot will be the PIC responsible for the operation and safety of the aircraft during the flight (e.g. the safety pilot will "act" or "serve" as PIC). In this situation, the safety pilot may log all the flight time as PIC time under Section 61.51(e)(iii), provided he or she is otherwise qualified to "act" or "serve" as a PIC (e.g. having a current flight review, appropriate ratings and endorsements etc.) and the pilot under the hood may log, concurrently, all of the flight time during which he or she is the sole manipulator of the controls as PIC time in accordance with Section 61.51(e)(i).

3. It is common for time builders to fly with a partner that is designated as a safety pilot. This allows both pilots to log PIC time but then split the cost of the overall rental (for example you can log 100 hours of PIC time but only pay for approximately 50 hours of it). Although this is perfectly legal, you must follow the regulations to do it properly. The pilot flying must be instrument rated however the safety pilot does not have to be. The total amount of flight time that the pilot flying is wearing a view limiting device the safety pilot is now a "required crew member" and can log the flight time as PIC. The flight must occur in VFR conditions and not on an IFR flight plan. Even though both pilots are logging this flight time as PIC there can only be one PIC who is the "sole manipulator of the controls" and is responsible for the safety and operation of the airplane. The following are some additional considerations:
If the flight occurs at night both pilot can log it as night time.
If the flight is a cross country, then only the pilot flying can log the the cross country time because they are the one landing the airplane. This does not apply to ATP time builders because the ATP rating does not require you to land for it to be considered a cross country.
If you are flying a multi engine airplane then both pilots must have their multi engine ratings.
If you are flying a complex airplane the safety pilot does not need to have their complex endorsement, because an endorsement is not a rating and they only need to be rated in the airplane class.
If the flight occurs on an IFR flight plan, the non-instrument rated safety pilot can log the flight time as SIC during the time the PIC is wearing a view limiting device. If both pilots are instrument rated then both of you can log this time as PIC assuming the safety pilot acts as the PIC and the pilot flying is the "sole manipulator of the controls".
Average__Pilot is offline  
Old 23rd Jun 2017, 06:50
  #194 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: UK
Age: 42
Posts: 333
^^^ just don't do that if you want an EASA licence, EASA will not recognise safety pilot hours as PIC.
rudestuff is online now  
Old 23rd Jun 2017, 09:07
  #195 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: London
Posts: 522
rudestuff,

Do you care to back up that statement?
selfin is offline  
Old 23rd Jun 2017, 09:52
  #196 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: England
Posts: 15
Originally Posted by selfin View Post
rudestuff,

Do you care to back up that statement?
That is indeed correct. EASA does not recognise safety pilot as PIC
jamesgrainge is offline  
Old 23rd Jun 2017, 10:41
  #197 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Hotels
Posts: 348
^^^ just don't do that if you want an EASA licence, EASA will not recognise safety pilot hours as PIC.
Fact. Don't do it!
M-ONGO is offline  
Old 23rd Jun 2017, 10:51
  #198 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: London
Posts: 522
jamesgrainge,

Yet the decision is left to the national authorities which must disregard one or more Part-FCL rules to discredit pilot-in-command hours logged by a person acting as pilot-in-command. The discussion properly belongs in this other thread: http://www.pprune.org/professional-p...-faa-easa.html
selfin is offline  
Old 23rd Jun 2017, 11:43
  #199 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: LED
Posts: 2
Thanks to you and all other guys, who made the same statement.

Originally Posted by rudestuff View Post
^^^ just don't do that if you want an EASA licence, EASA will not recognize safety pilot hours as PIC.

Thanks to you and all other guys, who made the same statement.

Still, as I do understand, Total Time is not counted as well in this case?

And most important, if I'll still do it, with intentions to go to Africa/ Asia to beat 500TT mark, it strictly depends on the particular country/ authorities, to recognize safety pilot time and include in total?
Anyone has info/ examples of particular state?
Average__Pilot is offline  
Old 24th Jun 2017, 09:28
  #200 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: England
Posts: 15
Originally Posted by selfin View Post
jamesgrainge,

Yet the decision is left to the national authorities which must disregard one or more Part-FCL rules to discredit pilot-in-command hours logged by a person acting as pilot-in-command. The discussion properly belongs in this other thread: http://www.pprune.org/professional-p...-faa-easa.html
The discussion is irrelevant though buddy.

Thems the EASA rules I'm afraid
jamesgrainge is offline  

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