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Books for the initial PPL...

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Books for the initial PPL...

Old 30th Nov 2020, 20:53
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dns
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Books for the initial PPL...

Can anyone recommend which study guides I should pick up...

My medical hasn't come back yet so I haven't picked a training provider but I'm prepared to take the plunge and invest in the books for my initial PPL so I can get to work (particularly as Covid has left me unemployed and bored to tears)

There seem to be a few different series out there, can anyone give me any personal recommendations?

The intention is to build the hours and do the CPL, IR, ME etc, so I'm happy to go with books which cover more than the basics needed for private flying

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Old 1st Dec 2020, 10:12
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Since all of the PPL exam questions are new, as of less than two months ago, and the technical subject books are not, some of whatever you buy now may have to be replaced when they catch up. Also, your chosen provider may stipulate using certain books - such as Pooleys for instance - because that's what their systems are based on.

Have you had any trial lessons yet to see who you like?
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Old 1st Dec 2020, 11:00
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Google AP3456 from the RAF Central Flying School
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Old 1st Dec 2020, 12:07
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You could start with the FAA Airplane Flying Handbook and Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical knowledge, available free online. That might save the expense until you know which school and the materials they might require.
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Old 1st Dec 2020, 18:33
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You could start with the FAA Airplane Flying Handbook and Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical knowledge, available free online. That might save the expense until you know which school and the materials they might require.
The chap who asked the question's location says he is in the South East - I assume he means England so it is not appropriate for him to use American documentation because there are many differences in the regulations, terminology and practices.

He would not go far wrong in getting a copy of the first in the Thom series "Pilot's Manual Volume 1 Flying Training APM EASA Book" available from Pooleys, Flight Store, Transair and others. All seem to charge 23!

My experience is that it is also desirable to read books from more than one author covering the same subject areas (preferably by begging or borrowing from someone who has just passed the exams) - you get a broader perspective that way.
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Old 1st Dec 2020, 18:58
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As MrAgerage says...
Training providers, whether ATO or DTO have to stipulate to the CAA which syllabus they will be following. In the case of most DTOs, like us, they will be picking one of the propriety brands.
In our case, the syllabus, the written material (textbooks) and any on-screen briefing notes all follow the same format, even down to the same graphics so there is a consistent thread running throughout.
As said above, wait until you settle on a particular training establishment and see what they recommend.
Also, as above, steer clear of books that don't reflect the current syllabus, it's harder to unlearn stuff that is plain different from what you'll need to get qualified in the UK.
Re the on-line exams, we were told at the seminar I attended that the current text books and exam prep books were appropriate and no re-writes will be required. This seems to be borne out by the recent announcement that there is a good pass ratio with the new exams.

You won't need the medical to get started with the flying, unless you want to see if you will actually be able to continue at all, which I can understand.

TOO
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Old 1st Dec 2020, 19:04
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I agree with Jim59, when I studied for my UK PPL back in the 80s I used Trevor Thom's very well written and detailed series of books. If they are still being published and in use I can highly recommend them. As also holding FAA professional licences and having flown in the US for 30 years I would advise against using the FAA written material if you intend to learn to fly in the UK. There are too many procedural and terminology differences.
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Old 1st Dec 2020, 20:04
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Ooops, yes, Jim59 and A Pandy are correct, I wasn't paying attention to the OPs location. And, I agree also, the Trevor Thom series is excellent (I used the FAA versions years ago).
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Old 2nd Dec 2020, 11:22
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For those who are recommending the Trevor Thom manuals, you are, I think, unwittingly, misleading the originator of this thread and others. The Thom's UK volumes have not been published for over a decade. They are available discounted from the UK Amazon but they are well out of date. The original Trevor Thom series have morphed into the 'Air Pilots Manual' series now by Dorothy Saul-Pooley and others; although they follow a similar format. If anyone is in the process of buying any of these manuals beware if they are listed by Trevor Thom because they will be well out of date.

Historically the CAA have liaised closely with the main publishers such as Pooley and Jeremy Pratt at AFE in order to ensure the current manuals reflect the current exams. Once the EASA got it's feet under the table a decade ago and started meddling there was initially some confusion. the publishers solved this by printing update supplements.
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Old 3rd Dec 2020, 09:59
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The Pooley's Air Pilot Manuals are what used to be Trevor Thom, they have been updated regularly ever since Pooleys took over "possession" of them. They are not by Dorothy although she may well have some input. To the best of my knowledge she is a separate entity from the Pooleys company. Standing by to be corrected.....
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Old 3rd Dec 2020, 11:10
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This book is often referred to as one of the Thom book series and is up-to-date with the current EASA edition published in March this year. It has a fine heritage.

Air Pilot's Manual Volume 1 Flying Training – APM EASA Book
Pooleys stock code: BTT010

CURRENT ISSUE: EASA EDITION 14th EDITION, MARCH 2020

Over 200,000 copies sold, this is the 1st of 7 volumes in a leading and most highly respected series of manuals for the training of private pilots. Constantly updated, edited and revised, by a highly qualified team. Thus making this series, a long recognised comprehensive reference available to both the student and instructor and is the standard reference for the CAA PPL examinations.

Flying Training Manoeuvres through to Instrument Flying
Preflight Briefings & How to Fly the Manoeuvres
Airwork Summaries
The PPL (A) Skill Test

– A Condensed History of the Air Pilot Manuals –

For over 30 years the Air Pilot Manuals have led the academic training of pilots in the United Kingdom and in many countries around the world.

I first met Trevor Thom, a professional pilot and natural teacher, in Melbourne during a visit to Australia in January 1985. He already had his series of PPL Manuals for the Australian market and I asked him to produce a series for the New Zealand market where we had a small aviation business. Having completed this task, Trevor immediately began writing the first of the Air Pilot Manuals for the United Kingdom market and this project began in earnest on 5th December 1985.

Both Trevor Thom and Robert Johnson commenced the task in my office at Felden. By the end of the following year, all four volumes were complete and were published in February 1987. By the end of that year, we estimated that 95% of all the UK Flying Schools were using our manuals. Volumes 5, 6 and 7 followed, so completing the full series.

Unfortunately, Trevor Thom had a serious accident at home which prevented him from continuing with the editing of the manuals. His rights were eventually sold to David Robson, another experienced pilot and natural teacher, who progressively improved the drawings and brought colour into the manuals for the first time.

Over the years there have been many assistant editors, in particular Peter Godwin, whose help I first asked for in the very early days with Trevor Thom and which continued until quite recently. The rights in the Air Pilot Manuals are now vested with the Pooley family and they continue to be edited and published from our offices and the Flying Instructor School at Shoreham Airport.

The Air Pilot Manuals have an outstanding reputation for accuracy and are continuously updated. They are recommended CAA reading material and are referred to extensively in the CAA examination answer booklet.

Robert Pooley MBE CStJ FRIN FRAeS

Look inside!

23.00 23.00 inc. VAT (Exempt)*

Last edited by Jim59; 4th Dec 2020 at 15:53.
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Old 3rd Dec 2020, 19:59
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Also worth mentioning that quite a lot of UK libraries carry some or all of the various pilot training guides. Borrow some and see which ones you think are best.
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Old 4th Dec 2020, 12:57
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I also used the Trevor Thom UK manuals when I learned to fly in 1989/90 and found them excellent.

If dns is interested, I will try to find them and dns can have them all for the price of postage- though bear in mine they will be somewhat out of date!

I also found a more general book called "Be a Better Pilot" by Alan Bramson very useful in my early flying days.
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Old 4th Dec 2020, 18:14
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Memories !

Good Old Birch & Bramson. I still occasionally refer to their words of simplified wisdom.
Bankstown & Shoreham ca. 1969 - 71
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Old 4th Dec 2020, 19:18
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If you are OK with reading electronically (iPad, computer, PDF etc), I would recommend sticking to the many free sources available online.

The FAA manuals are excellent, and the basics are the same anywhere. Some of the terminology may differ, along with the sequence of instruction, but it will undoubtedly help to gain a good background.

I would also second the recommendation to access the RAF manuals (AP3456). However, to help piece it all together, a couple of sessions of ground school would also be beneficial.

Top tip: you probably don't need to spend more money just yet. Good luck.
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Old 5th Dec 2020, 00:32
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The FAA manuals are excellent, and the basics are the same anywhere. Some of the terminology may differ, along with the sequence of instruction, but it will undoubtedly help to gain a good background.
Having had a browse of the basic FAA manual I feel there are too many differences and it will cause confusion. Even the circuit is not called that, and it has a different entry and no overhead join. Stick to UK manuals to begin with.
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Old 5th Dec 2020, 18:30
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I found Jeremy Pratt and Oxford DVDs were great.
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Old 5th Dec 2020, 21:36
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The PPL syllabus is very prescriptive, dividing the practical training into specific exercises. Using FAA literature will likely create confusion and frustrate your instructor!

The theoretical knowledge also contains many EASA and UK specifics, so you want either the AFE or Pooley's books. Make sure you have the latest editions for Air Law and Operational Procedures as there have been several changes in recent years due to the adoption of SERA (Standardised European Rules of the Air) and the new PPL e-exam syllabus.
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