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Gold Bars and Flying Suits

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Gold Bars and Flying Suits

Old 23rd Aug 2017, 23:26
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Gold Bars and Flying Suits

Just seen a photo in the UK Pilot magazine of someone wearing 4 gold bars with a mil-spec flying suit. A little OTT?
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Old 24th Aug 2017, 01:15
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No, not a little.

Completely.

Down the other side as well, I think.
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Old 24th Aug 2017, 02:28
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We've had many a thread here on the subject.
Personally I think you should have your medical revoked for being a complete tosser as you're clearly delusional for wearing bars and poop suits as a recreational pilot in a spam can.
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Old 24th Aug 2017, 07:23
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Well 4 bars might be OK for someone who needs a co-pilot to help them out - for a real sky-god , flying all by themselves, in a complicated C152 I think this is more appropriate:


Available from your favourite shop: 5-bar Novelty Epaulette

OC619
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Old 24th Aug 2017, 07:23
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hey, button push, there are a few things DIFFERENT about flying from ye olde white cliffes of Dover to the shores of France.

First of all, IT'S WET DOWN THERE. and very very cold. Are you WEARING your life jackets? because sure as hell if you end up in the water you won't have time to put them on.

And the difference between flying from St. Petersburg to Tampa, crossing that beautiful wide bay, following the long bridge to the other side, even without a life jacket on, you can enjoy the warm water of Tampa Bay for quite a while before losing it. Your life, that is. I met another sailor in Florida who fell off his own sailboat, and was in the water for 24 hours, and lived to tell the tale. He said he would never forget how beautiful his boat looked as he saw it sailing away, helm secured, without him! The next day, he was rescued by a shrimp boat, and had to stay on board until they had gathered their day's catch; his wife had given up hope by then.
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Old 24th Aug 2017, 08:05
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I know of someone (a PPL) who recently completed a round the world trip - he did it in a flying suit with 4 bars because he realized some of the places he was flying through wouldn't take his trip seriously/provide services etc. unless he actually looked the part. This proved to be the case in some of his stop-offs.
Wondering if it was a pic of him!
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Old 24th Aug 2017, 08:39
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No it was probably a well know air race pilot on the UK/(GB) circuit - with his female cojo who wore 3 bars...... wonder if he wore the grow bag in the C340 also??
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Old 24th Aug 2017, 08:41
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I would say gold bars should be confined to commercial pilots who are PIC. Many years ago I bumped into a PPL at IOM airport, in the black, black tie, white shirt and four gold bars, we were a bit puzzeled, despite the fact we have worked hard to gain a CPL/ATPL. Anyway this pilot was effectively passing as prossional qualified with a business owner and clients in the company aircraft. Thebottom line is he flew into the side of a mountain killing himself and five others.

As to flying suits (flying coveralls) there primarily designed to protect you from fire, but have the advantage of built in knee pads and lots of places to stow things securely, including pens, charts and a knife. Some aircraft it is difficult take a flight, such as a Pitts, Tiger, or Chipmunk, and solve alot of problems during during aerobatic flight, as you can keep your loose change in a zip up pocket. I think I wore flying coverals on my CPL test, but from an organational sort of point, the examiner was ex-RAF so he was fine about it.

Likewise the RAF style flying gloves give protection against lacerations and fire. In the summer months, when people might be in shorts and a short sleeved shirt, it is very easy to put on a flying suit, who afterall who would fly in shorts or a skirt, appart from cabin crew.

I believe in the 1970s pilots from both Hamble and Oxford wore flying coveralls, but these days commercial cadet pilots, want to dress up like airline pilots. Oddly, on the subject of clothing, no so long ago, I visted an airport, and I think it was Oxford, and the cadets were wearing nylon flying jackets, how stuped. After the Falklands conflict the CAA issued a directive through an AIC that pilots should attempt to wear clothing made from cotton.wool, and leather, including underwear, socks and shoes. This was because during ships fires, some of the burns were compounded by sythetic clothing including socks and underwear. A few years after that CAA directive, as an instructor, I was issued with a sythetic uniform to which I asked for a suitable natural fibre alternative, which rather upset the club.

There must be a good reason that the RAF on the AEF and UAS Grob 115 wear flying coverals, it is not to pose. Twenty five years ago few cyclists wore helmets, including myself, because of perceptions of cycle helmets. Now cycle helmets are the norm.

I don't think you should always knock flying coverals, sometimes the are worn for the right reasons, sometimes not.

Last edited by Homsap; 24th Aug 2017 at 09:02.
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Old 24th Aug 2017, 08:47
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Does it really matter whether a spamcan pilot wears a flying suit with or without rank slides on the epaulettes? Surely there must be rather more important things about which to feel concerned....

the CAA issued a directive through an AIC that pilots should attempt to wear clothing made from cotton, wool, and leather, including underwear, socks and shoes.
CAA-approved leather underwear ?
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Old 24th Aug 2017, 09:02
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Some undies should be approved.
They are certainly approved...by me.


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Old 24th Aug 2017, 09:41
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Actually, HRH Wales wore 4 bars on his flying suit. Many civilian Captains wear flying suits and do the same. I don't. OK, for the normal GA pilot (who is actually an aircraft 'captain'), it is a bit OTT. However, is it any different to wearing a plethora of old Sqn badges or RAF wings? Flying is fun and many of us like to keep links with our past. Yes, wearing wings (or a Jaguar patch as I do) is egotistical, but we are proud of what we have achieved. And is the wearing of flying suits not egotistical? In part yes, but definable a safety issue. For my part, wearing short-sleeved shirts, shorts and sandals to go flying is just plain stupid, but many do.
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Old 24th Aug 2017, 09:48
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Originally Posted by Homsap View Post
.....As to flying suits (flying coveralls) there primarily designed to protect you from fire, ..... Likewise the RAF style flying gloves give protection against lacerations and fire. In the summer months, when people might be in shorts and a short sleeved shirt, it is very easy to put on a flying suit, who afterall who would fly in shorts or a skirt, appart from cabin crew... ...I don't think you should always knock flying coverals, sometimes the are worn for the right reasons, sometimes not.
As an aside, there has been mention around PPRuNe, and other forums, over the years about when using fire protection gear whilst flying use gear suited to the job. Many comments how leather might not melt like synthetics though may cause issues if it is not easy to remove. Apparently leather can 'cook' you if it can not be removed the instant you are clear of the fire - eg, tight motorbike type leather jackets and gloves. The general view is if wearing leather make sure it is loose and comes off easy.





.
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Old 24th Aug 2017, 09:50
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Originally Posted by Homsap View Post
I would say gold bars should be confined to commercial pilots who are PIC. Many years ago I bumped into a PPL at IOM airport, in the black, black tie, white shirt and four gold bars, we were a bit puzzeled, despite the fact we have worked hard to gain a CPL/ATPL. Anyway this pilot was effectively passing as prossional qualified with a business owner and clients in the company aircraft. Thebottom line is he flew into the side of a mountain killing himself and five others.

As to flying suits (flying coveralls) there primarily designed to protect you from fire, but have the advantage of built in knee pads and lots of places to stow things securely, including pens, charts and a knife. Some aircraft it is difficult take a flight, such as a Pitts, Tiger, or Chipmunk, and solve alot of problems during during aerobatic flight, as you can keep your loose change in a zip up pocket. I think I wore flying coverals on my CPL test, but from an organational sort of point, the examiner was ex-RAF so he was fine about it.

Agree all what you write. Moreover, anyone who has read Richard Hilary's book 'The Last Enemy' will know the importance of wearing gloves.

Likewise the RAF style flying gloves give protection against lacerations and fire. In the summer months, when people might be in shorts and a short sleeved shirt, it is very easy to put on a flying suit, who afterall who would fly in shorts or a skirt, appart from cabin crew.

I believe in the 1970s pilots from both Hamble and Oxford wore flying coveralls, but these days commercial cadet pilots, want to dress up like airline pilots. Oddly, on the subject of clothing, no so long ago, I visted an airport, and I think it was Oxford, and the cadets were wearing nylon flying jackets, how stuped. After the Falklands conflict the CAA issued a directive through an AIC that pilots should attempt to wear clothing made from cotton.wool, and leather, including underwear, socks and shoes. This was because during ships fires, some of the burns were compounded by sythetic clothing including socks and underwear. A few years after that CAA directive, as an instructor, I was issued with a sythetic uniform to which I asked for a suitable natural fibre alternative, which rather upset the club.

There must be a good reason that the RAF on the AEF and UAS Grob 115 wear flying coverals, it is not to pose. Twenty five years ago few cyclists wore helmets, including myself, because of perceptions of cycle helmets. Now cycle helmets are the norm.
I agree all that you write. Anyone who has read Richard Hilary's book 'The Last Enemy' will know the importance of gloves.
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Old 24th Aug 2017, 12:11
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I used to wear a flying suit in the Chipmunk as it kept the oil off your clothes during the pre and post flight. When it wore out I just wore an old pair of jeans and a past-its-prime shirt. In the L4 Cub in summer, flying with the side open, shorts and T shirt were the norm, often bare foot as well.

I once accompanied a Beech Musketeer pilot to Skegness. He wore a flying suit.. in a Musketeer! On arrival his circuits were so massive that he kept losing sight of the field, and when spotting it, approaching it too far off runway heading to land. After half a dozen attempts and a bit of advice he kept the circuit tighter and managed to land. By now quite a crowd had gathered by the club house to see what on earth was going on with all these off-axis go-arounds.

The Beech owner took off his flying suit while still in the aeroplane "so they won't know who was flying it". As we 3 (we had a back seat pax) walked to the clubhouse from the aeroplane me and the pax positioned ourselves either side of our pilot, making vigorous pointing gestures at him. I think he took it in good heart.
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Old 24th Aug 2017, 12:31
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More than 4 decades of flying for my living, both military and commercial, during which I was required by the job to "look the part". The only situation which justifies private pilots having to present a similar image in my opinion, is when flying through Third World countries where, as Glasgow_Flyer suggests the natives might be impressed.


These days while involved in PPL activities, I wear flame-resistant coveralls to keep the dirt off my clothes during aircraft inspections. What a t....r I'd feel if I adorned myself with regalia!
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Old 24th Aug 2017, 12:34
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Just out of interest and bearing in mind the comments so far, does anybody do an "unflashy" flight jacket in Nomex? That would reduce the "posing" factor and be safer than the usual fabrics that are used.
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Old 24th Aug 2017, 14:10
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The starting point could be 1,000 hours per bar.
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Old 24th Aug 2017, 14:37
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The starting point could be 1,000 hours per bar.
If thats the case these guys must need a wheelbarrow to carry around their logbooks.

download.jpg
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Old 24th Aug 2017, 15:23
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could not care less what people wear when they fly, or what they wear in general and I certainly don't see the point creating a thread about this topic once a year or so.. does broadcasting your disapproval makes you feel better about yourselves?
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Old 24th Aug 2017, 15:25
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Originally Posted by ChickenHouse View Post
If you fly to an area where authority still has a meaning and you face a sub character trying to fool you, bars and suit helps to prevent the butthead from doing the wrong thing.
I'll take your word for that, but in small strips in the UK it won't do you any good. When I landed at a strip somewhere I'd not been before I asked if I need to wear hi-viz and they said no, but landing fee is double if you do, and double again if you have any bars on your shoulders.
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