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Passenger briefing uk

Old 16th Jul 2017, 16:06
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Passenger briefing uk

Hi can anyone help and provide the relevant parts of legislation

I know it's good practice to give passenger briefings but has it always been a requirement legally
I believe that part NCO mandates this now for easa aircraft but prior to that was there a air law that said that a private pilot on a private flight must carry out a briefing also is this a requirement on non easa aircraft

Is it a requirement on Fa aircft also ?
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Old 16th Jul 2017, 17:01
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Worth doing!

Briefing is something I've always done with new passengers whether fellow pilots or SLF. It was always advised as a precaution and to assist any potential insurance claim helping to avoid insurance companies asking "did you explain what to do to the passengers before taking off?". (Or in worst personal case, if they had to ask the passengers if the pilot - me, unable to answer due incapacity of whatever sort - had briefed them).

I simply say "for insurance purposes, let me explain what we do if it goes quiet" and then run through doors, windows, order of exit (back seats first) etc. And explain how unlikely they will need to know, but best they do.

It takes 3 minutes and apart from the claim aspect, could really help.
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Old 16th Jul 2017, 18:04
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Not an answer to your legislation question, but in case it's helpful: A lovely chap called Keith Jillings (also known as "Keef" on forums), now very sadly no longer with us, produced a couple of sides of A4 some years ago that he made freely available to people as an example of a GA passenger brief.

I kept a copy; you can download it here.

Last edited by DaveW; 16th Jul 2017 at 18:09. Reason: Clarity
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Old 16th Jul 2017, 19:11
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I don't see insurance as being any part of this. It's what we should all do whether required by law, club rules or any other coercion. If someone is in your aircraft you should brief them on normal as well as the abnomal and what you expect of them and what they can expect from you. It's the way I'd like to be treated so I do it to others.


ps. ANO 2016 The pilot in command must ensure that before or, where appropriate, during the flight, passengers are given a briefing on emergency equipment and procedures.
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Old 16th Jul 2017, 19:44
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Originally Posted by md 600 driver View Post
Hi can anyone help and provide the relevant parts of legislation
...
I believe that part NCO mandates this now for easa aircraft but prior to that was there a air law that said that a private pilot on a private flight must carry out a briefing also is this a requirement on non easa aircraft
ANO 2016 Art 73
Passenger briefings
73.(1) The pilot in command must ensure that before or, where appropriate, during the flight, passengers are given a briefing on emergency equipment and procedures.
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Old 16th Jul 2017, 19:56
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Yes, the law is irrelevant, you'd do it anyway. There's a whole bunch of stuff you want the passenger to know how to do, and how are they going to know if you don't tell them?


- Go to the loo before walking out to the aircraft
- Do what they're told on the airfield
- Keep away from the prop
- How to work their seatbelt and door
- Where the sick bag is
- "Tell me if you're feeling sick, don't just go quiet"
- Keep hands and feet and camera straps ect ect off the controls
- Don't drop anything on the floor
- Shut TF up if I tell you to, I'm busy
- Watch out for other aeroplanes
- Open their door before landing off airport
- Press the tit on the ELT after a crash if pilot incapacitated
- Know where the Pooley's is and be ready to hand me the right page on diversion
- Know where the fire extinguisher is
- Know where the first aid kit is
- Remind me to take my spare glasses when we leave the aircraft


And that's just the stuff for my comfort and safety!
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Old 16th Jul 2017, 20:24
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Many thanks all for your input
I am not advocating not giving passenger briefings as I think they are a very useful part of the flight all I wanted to know is when did this became a legal requirement
When I did my air law exams all those years ago I can't seem to remember it being a legal requirement then
I have looked in the 2009 ano and I havnt found any reference in there so I must deduce that it came a legal requirement in 2016
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Old 17th Jul 2017, 11:00
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It's been part of the law for as long as I can remember it's just that the 2016 is the latest re-incarnation of the ANO. And shoud you fly where it is not legally required, remember the briefing is as much for you as your passengers.
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Old 17th Jul 2017, 16:39
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As I have already said I am not advocating not giving briefing. I just wanted to know when It became a legal requirement as I can't remember ever being trained to do it when I learnt to fly private pilot in the 70s
In fact my particular steed if I didn't do it my passengers would have opened the door before the blades stopped and very expensive impact would very likely happen
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Old 17th Jul 2017, 18:17
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Why can't people read the question asked here?
It is not "should I give a briefing?"
It is "when did it become mandatory in law."
Situational awareness! Pay attention!
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Old 17th Jul 2017, 19:34
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We read the question. The answer was "why on earth would anyone need to know, given that they're going to do the briefing anyway?". That hasn't been answered either.
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Old 17th Jul 2017, 21:13
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Gertrude nobody has asked me that but here goes
The reason I wanted to know was because a guy at the aero club last week said it was a mandatory thing to do to give a passenger briefing, although I do give a briefing I thought I did it Because I thought it was good practice to do so , not because it is mandatory for a private flight I then started to wonder how many people are like me , and how many don't know they have too and how many just don't bother maybe it's something the CAA should advertise more
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Old 17th Jul 2017, 21:50
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Originally Posted by md 600 driver View Post
... because a guy at the aero club last week said it was a mandatory thing ...
Traditionally that's a precursor to somebody spouting utter rubbish about [whatever it is being discussed].

Your guy must have been either the extreme rarity that actually knows, or was somehow lucky and stumbled on the right answer.
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Old 17th Jul 2017, 22:00
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God! Isn't it tragic that people are asking if briefings are "mandatory" or "legally required"? Has our society really been brianwashed to that degree?

Whatever happened to making sure your guests were as safe as you could make them be simply by doing the job carefully and taking a reasonable degree of pride in doing it properly? That used to be the defining character of general aviation. I am aware standards have slipped...

Yachtsman have been doing this for decades and I had never, until today, really considered that briefings might have legal implications. They are just an immovable part of the scenery for common sense and safety's sake. Naiive? **** no! Professional! Just Professional. It would never occur to me to take anyone on a boat or an aircraft without a suitable safety brief. That's not done for legal reasons but for the simple responsibility of a decent man towards trusting people under his care, and the sooner we started thinking about it in those terms the better the world would be in many fields, not just aviation.

What a sick, pathetically acrimonious/paranoid world we live in if pilots, be they marine or airborne, think the primary use of a safety briefing is to ward off legal grief!

Grow a pair, you lot, will you? Why not just take a pride in doing what you do to the best of your ability?

Also, no amount of "briefing" will protect you if your negligence results in a claim, will it?

Moral;

1) Never fly pax who are so anal they might sue in the event of an accident. Decent people don't. (in the case of accident c.f culpble negligence)

2) If you do have an accident with such litigious arses on board ensure that the accident is not due to your negligence that is a totally different matter - ie be totally and unimpeachably Professional. Then their claim will fall on the stony ground where it belongs.

Last edited by noflynomore; 17th Jul 2017 at 22:11.
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Old 17th Jul 2017, 23:51
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Originally Posted by md 600 driver View Post
I have looked in the 2009 ano and I havnt found any reference in there so I must deduce that it came a legal requirement in 2016
2009 Article 88.
2005 Article 53.
2000 Article 44.
1995 Article 39.
1989 Article 36.
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Old 18th Jul 2017, 01:15
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I still don't think the question has been answered correctly here.
Responsible pilots will have been giving briefings as long as they can remember because it is "the right thing to do".
Then someone suddenly hears that it is now a legal requirement, and asks, when did that come about?
Obviously the legal requirement was introduced because of the litigious assholes in the passenger seat and because of the increasing numbers of assholes in the left seat not bothering with any form of responsibility.
This sort of change of official policy catches responsible people by surprise, "it shouldn't be necessary, I've been doing it for years".
And the question. When was this law introduced?
It is true the world is becoming ridiculously regulated, common sense is not recognised because it can't be guaranteed to succeed. There are too many assholes out there who try to not do anything because they can't be bothered. And then demand that it must be someone else's fault when it goes wrong.
Common sense and responsibility don't matter any more.
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Old 18th Jul 2017, 05:20
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For the record, FAA FAR 61.519 required the PIC to ensure all passengers have been briefed on smoking, seat belts and shoulder harnesses, doors and exits, survival equipment, oxygen and for overwater flights, ditching. Been that way since at least 1989.
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Old 18th Jul 2017, 07:56
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FFS I thought private flying in light aircraft with a few mates was supposed to be relaxing and fun!
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Old 18th Jul 2017, 19:35
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Originally Posted by Crash one View Post
I still don't think the question has been answered correctly here.
It's a bit like that Air Law or IR(R) question: "is the legal visibility in [such and such circumstances] 1500m or 1800m?".

The correct answer is: "WGAS? - if it's less than 5k I'm not going flying anyway".

Similarly the answer to questions about legal requirements for passenger briefing is: "WGAS? - I'm doing it anyway, whether or not it's a legal requirement".
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Old 18th Jul 2017, 21:16
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Originally Posted by simmple View Post
FFS I thought private flying in light aircraft with a few mates was supposed to be relaxing and fun!
It is, until you screw up, then they will sue the daylights out of you or your estate!
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