Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Non-Airline Forums > Private Flying
Reload this Page >

Foreign annex II in the UK

Private Flying LAA/BMAA/BGA/BPA The sheer pleasure of flight.

Foreign annex II in the UK

Old 1st Aug 2011, 16:27
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: on short final
Age: 43
Posts: 90
Foreign annex II in the UK

Can anyone tell me what rules there are for foreign annex II aeroplanes in the UK?

I know that planes on a foreign Permit can only stay in the UK for a limited period of time, but the aeroplane in question is on a CofA.

As it is obviously adhering to local rules in another EASA country I am in doubt if it is treated like a Permit?

If we were to relocate the plane to the UK, I assume we will have to fly it back for its annuals, although it is pretty standard Lycoming propelled rag and tube stuff.

Thanks
mmgreve is offline  
Old 1st Aug 2011, 19:22
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Plumpton Green
Age: 75
Posts: 1,032
Annex II, so outside of EASA control, yet it has a CofA?
patowalker is offline  
Old 1st Aug 2011, 22:41
  #3 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: on short final
Age: 43
Posts: 90
yes

There are two types of aircrafts outside EASA, those on local permits and those that are on local CofA. The later will be aircrafts with a local certification, but not an EASA.....typically because they are old and rare. A number of ex military fall into this category. The aircraft in question is only built in 56 examples shortly after WW2.

I have noted a number of Yak18T's on Hungarian registry. I assume they operate under annex 2 in the UK?
mmgreve is offline  
Old 1st Aug 2011, 22:47
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 13,640
If it has an ICAO CofA the obvious baseline is all the N reg aeroplanes that are flying in the UK. I can't see any difference between that and, say, a Hungarian aeroplane which is Annex II with a CofA.

An organisation I work with has an Annex II D-reg aeroplane doing aerial work based in the UK but flying across the world. The main issues are the need for German validation of crew licences, and use of a German maintenance facility for the annual.

G
Genghis the Engineer is offline  
Old 2nd Aug 2011, 16:09
  #5 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: on short final
Age: 43
Posts: 90
Thanks Ghengis,

.....but it absolutely has to be flown back for the annual? I am thinking that in these EASA days, the CAA's of the various countries might trust each others engineers?
mmgreve is offline  
Old 2nd Aug 2011, 16:16
  #6 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Europe
Posts: 5,937
I am thinking that in these EASA days, the CAA's of the various countries might trust each others engineers?
What a stupid idea, that won't keep the EASA Shysters in gainful employment!
Whopity is offline  
Old 2nd Aug 2011, 16:48
  #7 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 13,640
Originally Posted by mmgreve View Post
Thanks Ghengis,

.....but it absolutely has to be flown back for the annual? I am thinking that in these EASA days, the CAA's of the various countries might trust each others engineers?
It's what we do, but it may be easier and cheaper to fly their Engineers to you by Ryanair.

G
Genghis the Engineer is offline  
Old 3rd Aug 2011, 08:37
  #8 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: on short final
Age: 43
Posts: 90
It is only going to Denmark, and although it is going pretty slow, it is probably easier just to fly it back.

Thanks for the advise, CAA were not very informative when I called them
mmgreve is offline  
Old 3rd Aug 2011, 22:45
  #9 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: London
Age: 47
Posts: 585
This sounds like yet another example of something which should be quite straightforward, being made unduly complicated by our friends at EASA.
julian_storey is offline  
Old 3rd Aug 2011, 23:58
  #10 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 13,640
I know that we all love EASA bashing, but they are excluded from EASA (for whatever reason) so the rules are exactly as they were pre-EASA, and exactly as they'd be for a CofA aeroplane from a non-EASA aeroplane such as the USA.

So, I really don't think that you can blame EASA for this one.

There's so much we can blame EASA for, you can probably let them off occasionally.

G
Genghis the Engineer is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.