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Knotty Problem

Old 12th Apr 2021, 03:55
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Knotty Problem

Do the tech manuals detail the required knot to be used? Should be OK, has gaffa tape.


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Old 12th Apr 2021, 04:04
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About 90 kts.... that 100 mph tape.
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Old 12th Apr 2021, 04:08
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Isn't that strut in tension when airborne? The only worry then is the weight of the wing on the ground, so that gaffa tape should be fine...
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Old 12th Apr 2021, 04:18
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Originally Posted by KRviator View Post
Isn't that strut in tension when airborne? The only worry then is the weight of the wing on the ground, so that gaffa tape should be fine...
I’d like to know how it was bent/damaged in the first place. Must have been some tricky manoeuvre 😳😳
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Old 12th Apr 2021, 05:20
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A draggy bit of wood that. And that’s knotty as well...wood not be happy about it’s structural integrity, either
Good Q... how was it bent ?
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Old 12th Apr 2021, 05:46
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What could possibly go wrong....
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Old 12th Apr 2021, 05:49
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Aside from the extra parasitic drag and the fact that the wing is hanging lower, it would probably be airworthy.
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Old 12th Apr 2021, 06:02
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An oldie but a goodie!
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Old 12th Apr 2021, 09:15
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At least they remembered to chock the wheels.
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Old 12th Apr 2021, 09:41
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I have the STC for this prop-blade repair:


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Old 12th Apr 2021, 22:12
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I'm guessing someone tried either to lift the aircraft from the bottom, or pushed hard the wingtips down.. Third option someone reversed the car.. In any case I don't know why people think the wing strut is unbreakable/unbendable.

Think about this picture next time when you step on to check the fuel..
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Old 13th Apr 2021, 07:56
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Originally Posted by Bosi72 View Post
I'm guessing someone tried either to lift the aircraft from the bottom, or pushed hard the wingtips down.. Third option someone reversed the car.. In any case I don't know why people think the wing strut is unbreakable/unbendable.

Think about this picture next time when you step on to check the fuel..
Plenty of Cessnas have footsteps strapped onto the struts for that very purpose.
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Old 14th Apr 2021, 00:59
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Originally Posted by stevef View Post
Plenty of Cessnas have footsteps strapped onto the struts for that very purpose.
Yep, and they were designed 40 years ago when the weight of an average American was around 70kg.
Fast forward 40 years later, we are heavier, the aircrafts too are getting older, everything has an "best before" date including steel wing struts..
I wonder why those steps are not installed on some other high wing aircrafts ?
​​​
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Old 14th Apr 2021, 04:38
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I have often wondered why there is not a 'Weight limit' stencilled on said strut....or on that 'little tab step' on the fuselage, or in POH ??

(aircrafts? )

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Old 14th Apr 2021, 12:50
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Originally Posted by Bosi72 View Post
Yep, and they were designed 40 years ago when the weight of an average American was around 70kg.
Fast forward 40 years later, we are heavier, the aircrafts too are getting older, everything has an "best before" date including steel wing struts..
I wonder why those steps are not installed on some other high wing aircrafts ?
​​​
Considering the inflight loads I'd much rather step on this and bend it than get it in the air and find out. Yes the loads on it aren't the same things but if you stepping on it bends it then you were already in trouble and either that aircraft needs to go or you need to hit the gym :P
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Old 14th Apr 2021, 12:59
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Originally Posted by Ixixly View Post
Considering the inflight loads I'd much rather step on this and bend it than get it in the air and find out. Yes the loads on it aren't the same things but if you stepping on it bends it then you were already in trouble and either that aircraft needs to go or you need to hit the gym :P
Materiel fatigue and structural damages are cumulative...
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Old 14th Apr 2021, 15:29
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Originally Posted by Bosi72 View Post
Materiel fatigue and structural damages are cumulative...
I get that and the idea that stepping on that step a few times a day for a couple of decades accumulates as well but I'd dare say it's a small percentage of the overall degradation that occurs from inflight stresses.
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Old 15th Apr 2021, 00:25
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For the full story of what actually happened look up NTSB investigation docket CEN20CA112.. In essence,, bounced on landing, entered soft surface,nose gear collapse and a/c overturned. Simples....
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Old 15th Apr 2021, 04:57
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Originally Posted by Bosi72 View Post
Yep, and they were designed 40 years ago when the weight of an average American was around 70kg.
Fast forward 40 years later, we are heavier, the aircrafts too are getting older, everything has an "best before" date including steel wing struts..
I wonder why those steps are not installed on some other high wing aircrafts ?
​​​
Pretty sure even brand new ones still have them
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Old 13th Dec 2021, 00:31
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Some airports I’ve been to had itty bitty ladders that made it easy to get over the top of the wing and check the level of fuel.

As to passengers getting heavier…

Minimal fuel load within limits, dump any extraneous material from your flight bag, make sure you have plenty of runway. Always remember weight and balance.

Way back when airlines had scales that they had the luggage AND PASSENGERS step onto so that they knew what they were carrying.
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