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Unresponsive 208 above BNE, RFDS intercept

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Unresponsive 208 above BNE, RFDS intercept

Old 3rd Jul 2020, 09:10
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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Is anyone familiar with the aircraft type able to give insight into what the warning / caution noises heard toward the end of the recording were? Iím not familiar with any of the Cessna 208 warning sounds.
AmarokGTI is offline  
Old 3rd Jul 2020, 09:16
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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Well done to everyone involved. The professionalism of everyone involved makes me want to get back in the air again.
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Old 3rd Jul 2020, 09:36
  #23 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by halas View Post
@machtuk "40 years diving planes"? 🤣

@compressor stall I was working NSW Air Ambulance when this happened. Still friends with he nurse in the event. Your recollection is correct.

halas
yep driving planes -) still doing it actually but under my terms -)
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Old 3rd Jul 2020, 10:54
  #24 (permalink)  
 
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I think the emphasis was on ‘diving’ aeroplanes!
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Old 3rd Jul 2020, 12:36
  #25 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by AmarokGTI View Post
Is anyone familiar with the aircraft type able to give insight into what the warning / caution noises heard toward the end of the recording were? Iím not familiar with any of the Cessna 208 warning sounds.
The G1000 equipped versions have an alarm for fuel tanks selected to off, fire, and low fuel plus some other annunciations from the display.

By that time, Iím guessing it was the low fuel which start chiming at below 200 pounds per tank.

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Old 3rd Jul 2020, 13:19
  #26 (permalink)  
 
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Oxygen issue at FL110? Anyone knows if that was really the issue? I would be surprised as In Zambia it was common practice to cruise up to FL130 with no oxygen for the sake to fly above the haze layer during my time there. Never heard of any issue.
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Old 3rd Jul 2020, 13:37
  #27 (permalink)  
 
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Four hours is a long time at 11k if youíre not on oxygen. Especially at night.

I remember 10k in a chieftain for 90 mins was a struggle in the day to stay awake.
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Old 3rd Jul 2020, 13:47
  #28 (permalink)  
 
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4 hours! Wow! I missed that bit! I guess you’re right. Happy it ended well. = )
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Old 3rd Jul 2020, 14:31
  #29 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Blueskymine View Post
Four hours is a long time at 11k if youíre not on oxygen. Especially at night.

I remember 10k in a chieftain for 90 mins was a struggle in the day to stay awake.
oh please...
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Old 3rd Jul 2020, 15:23
  #30 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Blueskymine View Post
Four hours is a long time at 11k if youíre not on oxygen. Especially at night.

I remember 10k in a chieftain for 90 mins was a struggle in the day to stay awake.
Iíve spent half my life at 8,000 it feels like, canít imagine the extra 2,000 taking me from totally fine to unconscious.
VariablePitchP is offline  
Old 3rd Jul 2020, 19:53
  #31 (permalink)  
 
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Actially it was a long haul airline pilot who fainted when he realised there was no crewrest at top of climb.
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Old 3rd Jul 2020, 23:37
  #32 (permalink)  
 
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VariablePitchP muses

I’ve spent half my life at 8,000 it feels like, can’t imagine the extra 2,000 taking me from totally fine to unconscious.
Then you had better believe it. We were always on O2 above 5000 at night.

CC
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Old 4th Jul 2020, 00:25
  #33 (permalink)  
 
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Hypoxia affects different people in different ways, and is dependent on age, physical condition, smoker/non-smoker, fatigue and a multitude of other factors.

I have no idea what caused this event, but don't assume that just because you read that a time of useful conciousness at X altitude is Y minutes that you won't suffer the effects until higher or later.
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Old 4th Jul 2020, 00:46
  #34 (permalink)  
 
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By the sounds of it some of you are so unfit/unhealthy I question if you should be flying or not.
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Old 4th Jul 2020, 03:51
  #35 (permalink)  
 
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That controller did a great job, going to drink some Claws and light some fireworks in his name tomorrow 👍🏻👍🏻
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Old 4th Jul 2020, 05:47
  #36 (permalink)  
 
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spektrum, I trust you are not questioning my ability, fitness or health. I followed my employers instructions regarding the use of O2 above 5000 at night as did my colleagues.

Perhaps as it appears as though you do not understand some aspects of the human body that you should avail yourself of a visit to a facility with a Hypobaric Chamber and undertake their course.

I believe you will not only be surprised by the experience but you may also be enlightened.

CC
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Old 4th Jul 2020, 07:30
  #37 (permalink)  
 
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I always understood night vision starts to be impaired above 5000' without supplemental oxygen.
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Old 4th Jul 2020, 09:03
  #38 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Checklist Charlie View Post
I trust you are not questioning my ability, fitness or health. I followed my employers instructions regarding the use of O2 above 5000 at night as did my colleagues.

Perhaps as it appears as though you do not understand some aspects of the human body that you should avail yourself of a visit to a facility with a Hypobaric Chamber and undertake their course.

I believe you will not only be surprised by the experience but you may also be enlightened.

CC
How do airline pilots survive?
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Old 4th Jul 2020, 09:08
  #39 (permalink)  
 
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I did quite a few long flights at 10,000’ day and night in a light a/c and never had any issues.........

Above 5,000’ at night seems a bit excessive. You’d better not fly long haul in a typical wide body jet then.....
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Old 4th Jul 2020, 09:55
  #40 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by ACMS View Post
Above 5,000’ at night seems a bit excessive. You’d better not fly long haul in a typical wide body jet then.....
Agreed. FAR require cabin altitude of less than 8000' for transport cat aircraft. At we're sitting up that high for many many hours.

But, if your employer says wear gas when lower. why not.

compressor stall is offline  

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