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Glide approach to land technique

Old 2nd Apr 2019, 02:23
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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North America is N, we are VH. We are Y, NA is K
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Old 2nd Apr 2019, 03:14
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by uncle8 View Post
North America is N, we are VH. We are Y, NA is K
Except for the bits that are 'P'. Oh, and the bits of 'North America' that are Canada, Mexico etc....

Great Britain G, France F, Germany D, Italy I
Yeah....you might want to check those too.
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Old 2nd Apr 2019, 05:25
  #23 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by "Back in the Day" Leddee
Why did the seatwarmers in Canberra ever agree to Australia giving away A----- for Y??? We don't live in Yustralia?? North America would never give away N
Surely surely surely please tell us this is a windup?? I will not fall for the trap that Uncle and forback have by saying yet another bit of Fake News from Leddee!! Oops. I think I did...
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Old 2nd Apr 2019, 09:53
  #24 (permalink)  
 
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Leddie I was always intrigued by the Verey Pistol instructions at the all over field at PFD (or AAPF to you!):
White Flare = Wind change - caution
Red Flare = Danger Go around again
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Old 2nd Apr 2019, 10:21
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PS: Why did the seatwarmers in Canberra ever agree to Australia giving away A----- for Y??? We don't live in Yustralia?? North America would never give away N, likewise Great Britain G, France F, Germany D, Italy I, Canada C??
A bit confused there old boy! The aerodrome location indicator prefix changed from A to Y in the early 90's. Fort Fumble had a reason for it, but it was full of hot air as usual (have a look in the AOPA magazine in the early 1990's for the story). The N, G, F, D etc aircraft registration prefix is totally different. Australia started at G-AUxx and when it changed to VH-xxx the aircraft that were already on the register then became VH-Uxx hence a lot of old aircraft carried a reg starting with U. Do a Google for the full story.
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Old 2nd Apr 2019, 13:59
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Triadic,
Not really, just having a bit of a rant about losing the A --- as I think you were alluding to, we were sold down the drain by Canberra --- the same mob who decided we didn't need WAAS/GBAS fifteen years ago, but now that it is virtually superseded by GPSIII etc, we are going tp get it
Indeed, you and I know how there have been various "explanations" of why we have VH not only for aircraft registrations, but where WT callsigns for Australia feature VH.
Not all that long ago, the EU proposed that all the traditions aircraft registrations as mentioned in the previous post would be dropped and a common register for all EU/EASA area aircraft.
Unlike most EU nonsense, it lasted about two minutes and ten seconds. The G, D,F, I etc stay.
Tootle pip!!
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Old 2nd Apr 2019, 23:32
  #27 (permalink)  
 
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Hey Triadic,

just the man to answer this question for me I know this is off topic so apologies in advance!

years ago there was a list of radio call sign prefixes which included ham radios, aircraft callsigns etc.

VH was listed for aeroplanes, VK for amateur radio, and I am sure there were other V? Prefixes reserved but not yet assigned for aeroplanes.

Multiple country prefixes is not unheard of - By way of example Brazil has PR and PT from memory.

do you recall any further V? prefixes being reserved for aircraft in Australia for the inevitable day when we run out of the existing combinations - we are already assigning VH-ZZ? Regos.

sorry for the oblique and off topic question but Triadic’s post reminded me that he might know the answer to this thoroughly unimportant and vexing question


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Old 3rd Apr 2019, 00:20
  #28 (permalink)  
 
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do you recall any further V? prefixes being reserved for aircraft in Australia for the inevitable day when we run out of the existing combinations - we are already assigning VH-ZZ? Regos
Hi Snake.... yes there was one other that was used by aircraft in Australia... VM-xxx and it was the exclusive use of the Military when I started flying in the 60's. I remember the Winjeels at PCK (VM-Hxx) used them as well as the Herc's when they had the A model. Changed when they started using squadron prefix's sometime late in the 70's. Hope that helps.
Don't know where VM sits these days....

Last edited by triadic; 3rd Apr 2019 at 06:39. Reason: Memory spike
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Old 3rd Apr 2019, 22:42
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Folks,
Re. Post #20, must have been too late at night/early in the morning, and didn't convey the intended meaning, my apologies. Even if it did have the unintended but nonetheless satisfactory consequence of stirring Bloggsie up -- always fun.
And get with the zeitgeist, Bloggsie, by definition anything one may disagree with is declared "fake news" --- .As if that settles the matter??
Tootle pip!!

Last edited by LeadSled; 3rd Apr 2019 at 22:53.
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Old 3rd Apr 2019, 22:57
  #30 (permalink)  
 
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"Stay on thread, stay on thread!" Or has PPRuNe turned into Leeddie's memoirs?
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Old 4th Apr 2019, 04:25
  #31 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Capn Bloggs View Post
"Stay on thread, stay on thread!" Or has PPRuNe turned into Leeddie's memoirs?
A bit of harmless thread drift is all to tempting at times.
Back on thread, I find it quite amazing that something that was (is) just part of the normal syllabus should generate any controversy at all ---- and nobody has told me where, in Yustralia those Oh!! So Busy!! GA airfields are, that a glide approach is a threat to the movement rate, let alone the nebulous thing "air safety".
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Old 4th Apr 2019, 06:11
  #32 (permalink)  
 
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Apologies Bloggsie

didnt think it it was worth a separate thread.
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Old 5th Apr 2019, 11:24
  #33 (permalink)  
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Found this gem on Mike Feeney's New Zealand website. I could not reproduce the Tiger Moth photo though but it was a three point landing in a green field.

From Mike Feeney. Rex is a highly experienced New Zealand flight instructor whom I have known from the early days of his flying career. He is a strong advocate for good old-fashioned Airmanship and is certain that new pilots should become competent at traditional "stick and rudder" skills; both in the air and on the ground. Hear...hear Rex!

"Ah, what memories the photograph recalls. The erratic rumble of the ancient Gipsy Major clattering away at a slow idle; that anticipation of the coming flight. Climbing into the open cockpit and pulling the straps over one's shoulders, fishing for the broad lap-straps and fitting them over the pin of the Sutton harness and pushing home the vital retaining pin. Waving the chocks away then a short burst of power to get moving then full rudder, another burst of power with the assistant holding a wing-tip and pointing the Tiger to the end of the runway.

Taxiing slowly, moving head from side to side to see around the long nose. The engine checks were done while still chocked so it is a few simple checks such as elevator trim, fuel selector cock full forward, flight controls through their full range; then line-up, look around for other aircraft, close the side hatch and slowly open the throttle. A dab of left rudder to prevent the swing, stick central and the tail rises of its own accord. The ride across even the bumpiest grass is the ride of a Rolls-Royce. A brief take-off run and the Tiger is airborne; eager to fly.

The Gipsy Major is now sounding smooth and sweet at full throttle. Power back to 2,100 rpm, airspeed 70 mph and a long climb looking all around for other aircraft. The visibility is not the greatest with all the wings, struts and wires.

Leveling out at a safe aerobatic altitude, engine back to 1,900 rpm. Then loops, rolls, stall-turns, inverted flight, hanging in the harness, and a spin. If the aerobatics were executed ineptly, maybe the engine quits and the propeller jerks to a stop. No electric starter motor here! So it's nose down steeply, the bracing wires singing in the airflow as the airspeed approaches 140 mph; the prop. still stationary but trying to flick over the cylinder compression until, suddenly, it keeps turning and with a throaty bellow, power is restored and thoughts of locating a paddock for a forced landing vanish into the wind.

Back to the 'field, power back to idle when downwind, a glide approach all the way with the engine popping continually. Descent profile controlled by judicious sideslipping until crossing the fence, straightening out at the last second to level off just inches above the grass. Leaning out the side to see the ground ahead as the nose comes up. Holding off... holding off... until the moment when the stick is quickly pulled hard back, the aircraft stalls and drops gently onto its wheels and tail-skid...a classic 'three-pointer'. We can all remember our instructor's words as he talked us through the landing sequence. Back, back, back....RIGHT BACK! Roll to a walking pace, no wheel brakes, feet busy on the rudder pedals, a burst of power to turn off the runway and the slow taxi back to the starting point. The assistant chocks the wheels, each magneto is checked in turn for rough running or a dead-cut. Then both switches to Off, throttle wide and the dear old Gipsy clatters to a halt. Other than the 'tinkling' sound of the cooling cylinders; silence!

The engine has done its job again, the flight is over but one's feeling of satisfaction and contented smile will linger for quite some time. Thanks for the memories, Sir Geoffrey de Havilland."
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