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Cancel SID maintain runway heading (or track).

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Cancel SID maintain runway heading (or track).

Old 18th Sep 2010, 07:59
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Cancel SID maintain runway heading (or track).

Very common to hear...

"Cancel SID maintain runway heading" or

"Cancel SID maintain runway track"

I have listened to many pilots who ALL had an OPINION on what was meant by each expression.

I would like to hear from ATCOs on their version.

eg There is a crosswind of 18 knots. Do you mean HEADING so airborne it becomes a vector, or TRACK to follow the extended centreline?

NOW IS TIME FOR PILOTS TO LISTEN. I HAVE ENOUGH PILOT OPINIONS THANKS.
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Old 18th Sep 2010, 08:36
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As I'm a pilot I'll refrain from offering an opinion and just include some information to help the discussion.

ENR 1.1 - 4.8.1

** Note: A pilot assigned a heading (including runway heading) must not compensate for wind effect.
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Old 18th Sep 2010, 08:43
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lol who cares just get the job done and forget about flying
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Old 18th Sep 2010, 09:38
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maintain runway heading and maintain runway track are two different things,track is adjust for wind, heading is not
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Old 18th Sep 2010, 10:12
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What if by the time you get told to maintain runway heading you have already established a heading to allow for drift - do you then turn back onto runway heading or continue as you are?
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Old 18th Sep 2010, 10:21
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I always wondered this too - acknowledging that being issued a heading means not to compensate for wind, someone once told me "Runways don't have headings" [they have a QDM].

Based on that logic, I consider the instruction to mean "fly a heading that will have you track on the extended runway centreline". That balances out with the idea of an aircraft that is already airborne and tracking on the centreline.

If you've got a specific reference or some more sensible logic, I'm all ears!
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Old 18th Sep 2010, 10:29
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This is pretty straight forward stuff people. I work for a major Asian carrier and this is what our Ops manual states:

Departure and Climb

Departure Tracking

If a SID or Departure Clearance specifies ‘Maintain Runway Heading’ it is implied that a drift correction will be applied in order to maintain the runway track.

Exceptions - USA, Canada and Australia require that “Runway Heading” be maintained without drift correction.
In other words in Australia, USA and Canada you fly a heading that corresponds to the runway track derived from the relevant Jepp or Dap chart. All the other countries you fly a heading that gives you the required runway track, i.e. allowing for drift.
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Old 18th Sep 2010, 11:28
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maintain runway heading and maintain runway track are two different things,track is adjust for wind, heading is not
Yes, I know. That is why I made the distinction. Geez.

This is pretty straight forward stuff people.
My regular study of world wide aircraft crashes shows that "straight forward stuff" kills people EVERY MONTH!

So, IF when used in Australia, "maintain runway heading" or "maintain runway track" MEAN the same thing (not yet established by the way). Then WHY do some tower units use either phrase, they are VERY different and in our world of standard calls I would think the INTENTION is different. (whoops, my OPINION). I do not have an up to date MATS/MOS so I really need ATCO input. Tower rated guys or girls preferably.
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Old 18th Sep 2010, 11:52
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The only place I have been given a 'maintain runway track' was Perth! But Perth is somewhat different to the rest of Australia!
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Old 18th Sep 2010, 11:58
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The only place I have been given a 'maintain runway track' was Perth! But Perth is somewhat different to the rest of Australia
NO, the rest of the world!!
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Old 18th Sep 2010, 13:34
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Icarus2001

In 25 years of flying I can’t remember ever getting a clearance “maintain runway track”.

The point is if your SID is cancelled and you are instructed to “maintain runway heading” in Australia, the USA and Canada you maintain a heading that is the same as the runway track on your Jepp plate, ie no drift allowance.
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Old 18th Sep 2010, 13:57
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Runway Track is used by night or non visual conditions below MVA

Runway heading is used for VFR or IFR on a visual departure.

All the references are spread around in AIP.. I dont have a current copy at hand but my saved electronic copy that was valid at the beginning of this year has this:
Phraseology GEN 3.4 - 51:
when a VFR aircraft, or an IFR aircraft cleared for a visual departure is issued radar heading instructions
Sl. (instructions) MAINTAIN RUNWAY HEADING [TURN LEFT (or RIGHT) HEADING (degrees)] VISUAL, CLEARED FOR TAKE--OFF

ENR 1.1 -11
para 4-8-1 Departure instructions may contain the following as required:

b. heading instructions;**

** Note: A pilot assigned a heading (including runway heading)
must not compensate for wind effect.

ENR 1.5 -36
10.4.4 In a radar environment,when aProcedural SID is cancelled before
take-off, ATC may:
a. require the pilot in command to depart in accordance with a
radar SID; or
b. issue alternative instructions that require the aircraft to depart on runway track using the climb gradient specified in the cancelled SID. In this case, ATC will use the phrase“CANCELSID, MAINTAIN RUNWAY TRACK (three digits) DEGREES”. Note: For the application of this procedure, the runway and radar SID tracks must be coincident up to the MVA.

Now for a bit of interpretation, if you are departing in non visual conditions or by night, below MVA, ATC can only vector you if:
1. You are flying a radar SID or
2. You fly the the first part of the SID eg "maintain Runway track" (which is what you do when you fly a SID) until MVA is reached after which any heading can be applied.

hope that helps
Wal in not so different Perth
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Old 19th Sep 2010, 03:41
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It's generally a VMC vs IMC thing. Yes, runway heading and runway track are different in Australia.

"Cancel SID maintain runway heading visual". Note the "visual" in there - it's now a visual departure. The pilot(s) are to maintain their own terrain separation up to the minimum vectoring altitude. "Visual" is also a required readback. It can be handy to know the MVA - or just ask. When you maintain runway heading you don't compensate for wind.

"Cancel SID maintain runway track (180 degrees)". In this case as Mr sabre pointed out, you fly the climb gradient on the SID you were initially issued while tracking straight ahead. The SID is providing your terrain separation. You do compensate for wind. Again as per the previous post, the SID must allow you to fly runway track up to the MVA - so not every SID may be cancelled in this manner eg some SIDs for smaller aircraft have an early turn to get them out of the way faster.

You may also be given "leaving 2000 (or whatever the MVA might be), cancel SID turn left heading 180". This one probably most often used for weather avoidance where a pilot can't/won't accept a visual departure eg "Cancel SID turn left heading 180 visual". Another instance where knowing the MVA is useful. A visual departure generally allows you to turn earlier than the MVA. ATC won't (well, shouldn't) issue a visual departure if you can't achieve it.
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Old 19th Sep 2010, 08:02
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Thanks for the useful info Al.

I think the gradient and "visual" are perhaps the key here.

However I have been given both instructions in VMC, whilst IFR and certainly hear plenty of examples in VMC of both calls.
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Old 19th Sep 2010, 08:58
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Nothing actually precludes ATC from using Maintain Runway Track in VMC

Consider taking off with a 30 + kt crosswind, a departing aircraft is going to drift well to one side of the centre-line, ATC may well opt for "runway Track" to ensure this doesnt happen
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Old 19th Sep 2010, 10:59
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Struth, why not clear all the confusion by dropping the word 'runway' completely from the instruction and substituting the number eg "after takeoff heading 180" or "after takeoff track 190"? When giving a heading one assumes ATC know the runway QDM and roughly what the wind is likely to do to the aeroplane as regards any terrain or traffic separation. When they don't, the track option is presumably the better. It may not be ICAO-speak, but since when did Australia worry about that?
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Old 19th Sep 2010, 11:13
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"Maintain runway heading"
Seems simple enough to me!

Dr

PS: ATC - "Doc, turn left, heading 270". Dr - "Ah, you want me to head 270 or track 270" ? ATC - "Geez Doc, its not rocket science. When I want you to take up a heading, I say "heading", and if I want you to track, I say "track"!
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Old 19th Sep 2010, 11:19
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I always instructed a pilot to fly a heading. Then I knew exactly where he was going...
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Old 19th Sep 2010, 21:49
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While we are being picky. Any chance we can forget using the term "QDM"?
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Old 19th Sep 2010, 21:53
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Heathrow Director, you THOUGHT you knew where he was going! From some of the dull-witted replies in the foregoing, it seems that there are still quite a few pilots who take it upon themselves to fly whatever THEY think will track the centreline despite a "maintain runway heading" instruction. In Australia, anyway.....Hence, let's pitch the instruction at the lowest common denominator, aka neanderthal pilot, and just give them a number in the hope that they can read a compass or CDI and know how to select either heading or track mode.
Even check captains sometimes have difficulty with this concept. A good friend once failed an initial command check because the ATC instruction was "after takeoff maintain heading 195" but the runway QDM (sorry Buzzy, economy of words) happened to be 197. My friend went into heading select mode and correctly dialled in 195. If it had been me failing a check for this, the checkie would have been sued for potential loss of income, and recommended for anal retentive syndrome counselling.

Last edited by Mach E Avelli; 19th Sep 2010 at 22:05.
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