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-   -   Old drills that you just can't forget. (https://www.pprune.org/military-aviation/510701-old-drills-you-just-cant-forget.html)

Bob Viking 20th Mar 2013 16:02

Old drills that you just can't forget.
 
As I prepared for take off in my Hawk (115) yesterday I ran through my take off emergencies brief. As is often the case I subconciously launched into the Jaguar abort drill of 'idle, hook, chute'. It's been nearly six years since I last flew the beast and I have many more Hawk hours now than I had Jaguar so why does it persist?
That got me to thinking, what other long lost drills can people not seem to shake?
Does John Farley find himself launching into early Harrier drills (something along the lines of 'spectacles, testicles, wallet and watch I would imagine!) whilst driving along the M1. Does BEagle bore his wife with his Vulcan pre-landing checks?
This is clearly a chance for the old and bold to reminisce about days gone by on their old aircraft types but I was just curious if it was just me that suffers from this affliction?
For all those Jaguar guys out there who can remember what this was used for 'TK, THT, CLR'?! Yet another drill that my brain won't shake!
BV:O

glad rag 20th Mar 2013 16:06

Cock, hook, look.

scarecrow450 20th Mar 2013 16:20

Blot, bang, rub !

Wander00 20th Mar 2013 16:25

STUPRE - for the Gnat afficionados

SASless 20th Mar 2013 16:30

OH....Cockpit Drills!

I immediately thought back to the Inch and a Half Electric Drill that had more Torque than a CH-53 and would wind me up and nearly beat me to death every time the Drill Bit seized in a piece of heavy iron. :uhoh:

oldbeefer 20th Mar 2013 16:35

My Friend Fred Has Hairy Balls still rings a bell from basic Chipmunt training in the 60s.

rotormonkey 20th Mar 2013 16:38

BTMIF
 
Bin
The
Motor
It's
F:mad::mad:ked

Bulldog engine s/d

HEDP 20th Mar 2013 16:43

Mixture, fuel and flaps. Harness, hood and brakes.

ACW599 20th Mar 2013 16:48

I doubt anyone of my generation will ever forget "Fuel on, brakes on, throttle closed, switches off".

Trim Stab 20th Mar 2013 16:52

When doing descent briefings I still can't point at anything on a map with my finger (minimum 25 press ups in the nearest puddle). It can sometimes be difficult to find a blade of grass or twig in a cockpit at FL430.

Bob Viking 20th Mar 2013 17:09

Phew
 
Good to know it's not just me.
Please feel free to explain your chosen drill so it makes more sense to others! As much as Fred will be pleased for us all to know about the overly hirsute nature of his man globes, what the hell does it actually mean?!
BV:confused:

Genstabler 20th Mar 2013 17:11

Right and left, two clicks, LAY!

smujsmith 20th Mar 2013 17:12

CBSIFTCB
(Controls, Ballast, Straps, Instruments, Flaps, Trim, Canopy and Brakes)
Gliding pre take off

WULF
(Water ballast, Undercarriage, Loose articles and Flaps)
Gliding pre landing

From RAFGSA club 1990's, I will never forget it.

Smudge

Tinribs 20th Mar 2013 17:18

Nasty moments
 
During a Canberra conversion Clive Hall (great instructor) rammed home to me "if you are losing it on an engine failure the aircraft MUST be landed, preferably on the runway, if possible with the gear down.

He certainly saved my life

When the moment came, leconfield 1974, and the world was going sideways I remembered.

Two out of three isn't bad

Lancman 20th Mar 2013 17:25

B,
U,
M,
P,
F.

Fox3WheresMyBanana 20th Mar 2013 17:26

I don't remember many of the words, but my hands can wander round the cockpit arranging the switches in the familiar pleasing-and-eye-catching manner. It's like they aren't a part of me - well weird.

NutLoose 20th Mar 2013 17:31

I have no live rounds, empty cases or misfires in my possession Sgt.

Suprised no one has mentioned GAS! GAS! GAS!



I don't remember many of the words, but my hands can wander round the cockpit arranging the switches in the familiar pleasing-and-eye-catching manner. It's like they aren't a part of me - well weird.
Odd that, I found myself at a museum sitting in the cockpit of a Wessex and I automatically did that without thinking about it.

Megaton 20th Mar 2013 17:41

I am the custodian of the no-lone zone.......(nearly 25 years ago :eek: )

EyesFront 20th Mar 2013 17:42

Even the humble T21 had one back in the '60s- CISTRS

Controls - waggle about and check they move the right flappy bits in the right direction
Instruments (there were only three) - check altitude reads zero
Straps - done up
Trim - check weight of occupants to see if ballast was required
Release - check yellow wooden knob works the release
Spoilers - check red knob moves them up and down - not that they actually did anything

Two's in 20th Mar 2013 17:45


I don't remember many of the words, but my hands can wander round the cockpit arranging the switches in the familiar pleasing-and-eye-catching manner. It's like they aren't a part of me - well weird.
In a similar vein I once found myself (on the ground) having changed the drive configuration on a helicopter, a procedure that involved moving throttles and switches with much dexterity and panache, with no conscious recollection of having done it! Obviously this was before the days of CRM where we trained the guy in the other seat to shout "Don't touch that you knob! We're still in the air".


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