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ATAC Hunter F58 N337AX Crash - 20 Jun 2022

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ATAC Hunter F58 N337AX Crash - 20 Jun 2022

Old 24th Jun 2022, 10:05
  #21 (permalink)  
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NASA are still operating 3 RB-57s.
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Old 24th Jun 2022, 11:55
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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NASA's B-57s originally had FY1953 serials (as B-57B/RB-57D), so a few years newer than the M-B Meteors.

They were given FY1963 serials when converted to RB-57F standard (later redesignated WB-57F) for NASA, and the TF33 (JT3D) engines that they now fly with are probably around 10 years newer than the Meteors' Derwents.
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Old 24th Jun 2022, 15:57
  #23 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by uxb99 View Post
Is the Hunter the only vintage Jet still in service?
Most of the F-58 ex-Swiss Hunters were new build between 1958 and 1960, which some later refurbished ex-RAF etc airframes later in the 60's and even into the 70's.

Pretty much the same age as many of the USAF KC-135's still in service, and the active B-52's are all 1960-1962, so not much younger.
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Old 24th Jun 2022, 16:29
  #24 (permalink)  
 
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I understood that DERA had been given one to run without oil. I had been told that it ran for weeks not hours. Of course I am always easily wound up.
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Old 24th Jun 2022, 18:16
  #25 (permalink)  
 
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Is the Hunter especially difficult to eject from? I seem to recall a Hunter with electrical issues going down over an estuary some years ago in Wales (?). Pilot also suffered back injuries.
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Old 24th Jun 2022, 20:51
  #26 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by uxb99 View Post
Is the Hunter especially difficult to eject from? I seem to recall a Hunter with electrical issues going down over an estuary some years ago in Wales (?). Pilot also suffered back injuries.
My back surgeon said that this was very common in pilots who bang out. He said he got to see most of them.
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Old 24th Jun 2022, 21:16
  #27 (permalink)  
 
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This Hunter probably has a Martin Baker Mk 4 seat in it (although some single seaters had earlier seats), and this seat has a 80 ft/sec gun which is at the limit for damaging your back (rocket seats have 60 ft/sec guns). When you bang out there is a probability that your spine will not be straight as it s difficult to be sure that you are sitting correctly. If your spine is straight all the vertebra will be parallel and you should escape any injury. However, if your back is slightly bent then the vertebra are likely to collide with each other and fracture - depending on the bend this will be the front or the back of the vertebra bones that will fracture, and in the day you might expect several weeks flat on your back to allow the vertebra to re knit..
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Old 24th Jun 2022, 21:42
  #28 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by uxb99 View Post
Is the Hunter especially difficult to eject from? I seem to recall a Hunter with electrical issues going down over an estuary some years ago in Wales (?). Pilot also suffered back injuries.
The pilot used to be a regular poster on here some years back, and it was also his second ejection as well, having had to eject from a Lightning some years earlier during his RAF service days.
The ejection from the Hunter though ended his fast jet flying days as a TP with BAe.
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Old 25th Jun 2022, 19:48
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Mrs WB627 was a physiotherapist, one of her patients a very tall gentleman 6'2" I believe, was a Lightning ejectee and was 2" shorter when he landed, hence the need for a phiso in later life.
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Old 26th Jun 2022, 14:31
  #30 (permalink)  
 
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All single-seat Hunters were fitted with Mk2 or Mk3 seats, rated at 90kts/ground level. The 2-seaters all had the Mk4 seat, with the same ejection envelope. One major difference is the Mk4 uses a combined harness, where on the earlier seats there were separate harnesses for the parachute and the seat. Yes, all had the 80ft/sec cartridge gun, which is pretty much on the limit of what the human frame will tolerate, resulting in a spinal injury rate of around 30% for such seats. Not as bad as it sounds, as the vast majority of people have a full recovery and most regain their ejection seat rated medical category. Rocket seats are kinder to the body, not just because the gun has a lower velocity, but mainly because the rate at which the G is applied is significantly lower.
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Old 26th Jun 2022, 15:07
  #31 (permalink)  
 
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was a Lightning ejectee and was 2" shorter when he landed
I assume you're referring to vertical stature. In any case, 2" is quite a hit.
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Old 26th Jun 2022, 16:47
  #32 (permalink)  
 
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Martin-Baker refitted its Meteors with Mk10 rocket seats rather than keeping the old 'gunpowder' seats, so I'm sure that it would be feasible to refit Hunters similarly. But at a cost...
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Old 26th Jun 2022, 23:14
  #33 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by OK465 View Post
I assume you're referring to vertical stature. In any case, 2" is quite a hit.
He was short in the leg and long in the trunk/neck, compressed all the disks in his spine.
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Old 27th Jun 2022, 14:09
  #34 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by WB627 View Post
He was short in the leg and long in the trunk/neck, compressed all the disks in his spine.
Not to be wished for by anyone, those take decades to recover. Am astonished he was still able to fly after that.
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