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10 most important RAF aircraft of the Cold War

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10 most important RAF aircraft of the Cold War

Old 26th Oct 2021, 22:00
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Sycamore; I think confrontation had settled down by then. The official peace treaty was Aug '66. I was training at Tern Hill, and slated to join 230 after completion. As it turned out, I joined 230 at Odiham in Nov '66. A very "short tour" of a few weeks before someone decided there were too many pilots, and I ended up converting to Wessex and setting off to Khormaksar.
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Old 28th Oct 2021, 16:08
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ShackEng makes a very valid point, while the obvious threat to the U.K. came from the east and the UK defences were mainly orientated in that direction there was a less obvious but very potent threat lurking in the deep waters of the North Atlantic not so far to the west. It was vitally important that the Soviet nuclear missile submarine fleet was tracked, and occasionally deterred, at all times day and night fair weather and foul. This the Shackleton did for years and years, at low level.
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Old 29th Oct 2021, 16:14
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Originally Posted by Lancman
ShackEng makes a very valid point, while the obvious threat to the U.K. came from the east and the UK defences were mainly orientated in that direction there was a less obvious but very potent threat lurking in the deep waters of the North Atlantic not so far to the west. It was vitally important that the Soviet nuclear missile submarine fleet was tracked, and occasionally deterred, at all times day and night fair weather and foul. This the Shackleton did for years and years, at low level.
Ah yes, I remember it well, anything up to 16-18 hour trips at low level with only one F/E.

Sycamore, the Bev carried an overload oil tank of 120 imperial gallons which was transferred when required by a hand operated wobble pump, in the inner ‘dog kennel’ aft of the flight deck, in flight. There was no facility to top up the overload tank in flight. IIRC the Centaurus engine had permitted oil consumption of 8 gallons per hour, and it’s oil tank held, normally, 25 gallons but could be overfilled, if memory serves, to about 32 gallons. I was a flying spanner, before the days of crew chiefs, on Bevs in those days, and must have pumped hundreds of gallons of cold 100U(?) oil in flight. I was on 53 Sqn.at Abingdon in the late ‘50’s, and one of our supply runs was Abingdon - Orange(Marseille) - Idris - Kano, night stopping at Idris and Kano. Thence a shuttle to Mamfe in the Cameroon’s where an RAF Rgt. Detachment operated with, again If I recall correctly, either single or twin Pioneers from the grass jungle strip, which was an interesting approach and landing for the Bev.
Due to its servicing schedule, it required a ‘Primary Star’ inspection at Idris, which amongst other items required all 144 spark plugs to be replaced. I normally completed the inspection just in time to get airborne the following morning.
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Old 29th Oct 2021, 17:23
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My apologies to all fir thread drift, put it down to senility.
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Old 29th Oct 2021, 19:08
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Originally Posted by Barksdale Boy
The Jaguar and Buccaneer seem strange omissions.
It would perhaps be easier to list those which needn't have turned up, but I can't think of any. If the 10 have to meet the prerequisite of frontline operational requirement, then its still very difficult to pick 10 which were more important. You could argue that of the three V-Bombers, the Valiant played an interim role prior to the Vulcan and Victor. Then how about the mark 2 versions of the latter two anyway? The Harrier, Buccaneer and Phantom were very important for revising the RAF's tactical roles, especially in Germany. The Lightning provided the much needed quick response to the growing threat of long range strike by the Soviets TU-16 Badgers in the early 1960s. Imagine if Duncan Sandys had his way entirely? Imagine trying to shadow and identify a Soviet TU-16/20/95 with a Bloodhound?!?!?!?

FB
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