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Author Seeking Accurate Information Regarding RAF Terminology

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Author Seeking Accurate Information Regarding RAF Terminology

Old 11th Feb 2020, 15:14
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Question Author Seeking Accurate Information Regarding RAF Terminology

I am a medically retired US Marine that is working on a book, that has 2 important characters who are former F-35B pilots in the RAF.

Obviously, I am trying to portray these professionals in the most accurate light possible, and have some small questions that are honestly probably too unimportant to post here regarding basic terminology.

So, if anyone out there has experience with the model, and wouldn't mind talking shop with someone that knows absolutely nothing about the subject... please message me!
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Old 11th Feb 2020, 18:24
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TScar

I honestly mean no offence but I would be amazed if any current F35B pilot will answer any questions via an internet forum.

BV
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Old 11th Feb 2020, 18:47
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What level are you talking about?
”Three Greens*”, “Happy Hour” or detailed operating stuff?

* “Four Greens” for Harrier, IIRC
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Old 11th Feb 2020, 18:56
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Just remember 'good show', 'wizard prang' and 'tally ho!' and you won't go wrong.

Happy to help.
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Old 11th Feb 2020, 21:25
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Old 11th Feb 2020, 23:34
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Writing a book on "former F35 pilots in the RAF".

Hard to imagine how one could write accurate shop talk and terminology on something that hasn't even happened yet...
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Old 11th Feb 2020, 23:38
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It's fiction. He/she can write whatever he wants.
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Old 12th Feb 2020, 00:03
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Give the guy a break! If it’s anything with Opsec implications, I’m sure our Jarhead friend would understand!
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Old 12th Feb 2020, 15:44
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No offense taken brother, just 'casting the lines' so to speak.
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Old 12th Feb 2020, 15:46
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I was looking more for basic verbiage for terms like 'mission'. Obviously American pilots refer to them as 'SORTIE's". I wasn't sure if it's different in the UK. Likewise for the term 'wingman'. And I was even curious if there is a nickname (derogatory or otherwise) for RAF Military Policemen?

Thanks!
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Old 12th Feb 2020, 15:50
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Have they taken on the term “Bona mates”, or did that get scrapped with the last of the Harriers?
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Old 12th Feb 2020, 15:54
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Originally Posted by ORAC View Post
https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x3v9z74
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Old 12th Feb 2020, 15:55
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meleagertoo does make a good point, but I'm trying to keep my eyes on the horizon in the realms of technology throughout the series, as I don't know how long it might take to be published.
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Old 12th Feb 2020, 22:50
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Pro Tip for our new / Leatherneck friend: if you click on the 'Quote' button at the bottom right of the post you are replying to, it will allow you to reply to that particular post.
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Old 12th Feb 2020, 22:53
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Many, many derogatory terms for RAF Police but 'Snowdrop' is a fairly safe one.
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Old 13th Feb 2020, 00:42
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Obviously American pilots refer to them as 'SORTIE's". I wasn't sure if it's different in the UK.
Unfortunately it is becoming more and more common to see exactly the same word used here in the UK. A decreasing number of us still use the correct word, which is "Sorties" We call that the "grocer's apostrophe" here in the UK by the way- is there an American equivalent?
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Old 13th Feb 2020, 08:06
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Originally Posted by Tankertrashnav View Post
We call that the "grocer's apostrophe" here in the UK by the way- is there an American equivalent?
In a similar vein, do Americans differentiate between that, which and who when linking clauses?
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Old 13th Feb 2020, 09:10
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Originally Posted by TScar001 View Post
I was looking more for basic verbiage for terms like 'mission'. Obviously American pilots refer to them as 'SORTIE's". I wasn't sure if it's different in the UK. Likewise for the term 'wingman'. And I was even curious if there is a nickname (derogatory or otherwise) for RAF Military Policemen?

Thanks!
To be clear, RAF Police are always just that and are referred to as Snowdrops and others. Military Police are the Royal Military Police from the Army, known politely as MPs or less so as Monkeys.
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Old 13th Feb 2020, 10:31
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Originally Posted by Sloppy Link View Post
To be clear, RAF Police are always just that and are referred to as Snowdrops and others. Military Police are the Royal Military Police from the Army, known politely as MPs or less so as Monkeys.
And RedCaps, of course. Due to the colour of their hats, IIRC.
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Old 13th Feb 2020, 11:02
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Snowdrops??? Always Snoops!!!!
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