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OFFICER and AIRCREW 'CANDIDATES' PLEASE READ THIS THREAD FIRST!

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OFFICER and AIRCREW 'CANDIDATES' PLEASE READ THIS THREAD FIRST!

Old 29th Mar 2010, 14:57
  #121 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: 119K East of SARDOT
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Mukiwa aka Damian,

This was clearly stated in a recent Weekly Recruitment Brief which are issued to AFCO's detailing the latest policy changes and the like.
OneFifty and, more importantly, Group Captain Recruiting do not know what the RAF's recruiting policy will be in 2.5 years time. Dig in - study hard; learn more about the UK's Armed Forces, the UK's political system, the EU, NATO, past and present conflicts involving UK Forces - get used to reading the Daily Telegraph/Times/RAF News off the Internet. As Whenurhappy stated, don't take no for an answer....

OneFifty, give the kid a break, as a potential aviator he already scores high on Foresight - he's asking questions, not buying an airline ticket.

S4G
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Old 29th Mar 2010, 17:59
  #122 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: RAF Cranwell
Posts: 33
OASC Bulletin 7

During this bulletin, we would like to make a brief statement about substance misuse and the criminal conviction policy in the RAF.

Some of the subjects posted so far are fairly dry but nonetheless form essential reading and base knowledge to aid progression through the selection process. During the next few bulletins, we will start to look at the selection process from start to finish from the view point of an imaginary individual applying for pilot.

Substance Misuse

Substance misuse is a general term that covers the misuse of drugs, solvents and anabolic steroids. The short, medium and long-term effects of substance misuse can have a damaging impact on an individual’s mental and physical fitness and health, even when the misuse has ceased. Consequently, it constitutes a direct threat both to the operational effectiveness of the Armed Forces and to the security and safety of Service personnel and, potentially, the civilians they protect. Misuse of drugs by Service personnel also damages the reputation and standing of the Armed Forces. For these reasons the misuse of drugs, solvents and anabolic steroids is not tolerated within the Armed Forces and personnel caught misusing these substances whilst in the RAF will be discharged. The Armed Forces recognize, however, that drug, solvent and steroid misuse is increasingly common in civilian life, particularly among the young, and that individuals may have misused drugs in the past. Criminal convictions for trafficking or supply of any class of drug will remain a bar to entry to the Services. However, disclosure of drug misuse will not necessarily debar a candidate from entry to the Service; acceptance or rejection will depend on the circumstances of the substance misuse and the candidate’s attitude towards the RAF’s policy. Evidence of the attitude will be obtained, in part, by the frequency of the use and the class and type of drug, solvent or steroid that has been misused.

Convictions

All applicants for service in the RAF will be required to declare previous convictions, in line with the guidance contained within the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974. This Act limits the declaration at the application stage to ‘unspent’ convictions except for those applicants for service in the ‘conviction-free’ Branches/Trades who must declare all previous convictions, spent or unspent. In addition, all candidates must declare unspent Anti-Social Behaviour Orders and those in the 'conviction free’ Branches/Trades must also declare Formal Police Cautions and Fixed Penalties. The following branches and trades fall into the conviction-free category: OSB (Prov), Legal, Chaplain, Medical, Dental, Nursing, MSO, PEdO, RAFP.

For more information regarding any of these areas highlighted, please contact your AFCO and they will be able to give you more detailed information regarding specific cases.

Please note that, although OASC will endeavour to answer generic questions that arise, we will not be engaging or commenting on individual cases. In those cases, the individual is advised to contact their nearest AFCO who will be able to deal with any queries. All information published is for information only. Information regarding a career in the RAF can be found at http://www.raf.mod.uk/careers

Last edited by OASC; 8th Jun 2011 at 09:45.
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Old 29th Mar 2010, 22:19
  #123 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
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I know he is only asking questions and I am giving him answers. I do not mean to be hard on him. Yes he sounds promising but I am just being honest with him. Of course, the situation may change in the future but, and this is only my personal opinion, it won’t be changing in the near future.

CaptainKing, I am sorry if I came across as being harsh with you, this was not my intention. I only wished to inform you of the situation as it stands at the moment. As S4G said, study hard in the areas he states, and maybe in the future, your age permitting, you never know. Good luck.
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Old 29th Mar 2010, 22:36
  #124 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: in my combat underpants
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Given our young hero has already shown a burning ambition to fly commercial and a definite positive interest in the SAAF, the RAF might, to some cynics, to be next on a list.
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Old 29th Mar 2010, 23:21
  #125 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
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I've heard rumours that the anthropometric requirements for Pilot/WSO may be changing due to the introduction of the Hawk T2. Does anybody know if these rumours are true?
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Old 29th Mar 2010, 23:43
  #126 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
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Leadership question

When asked to define leadership at a commissioning Board interview what would you reply?
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Old 31st Mar 2010, 02:13
  #127 (permalink)  
 
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Hey guy, thanks for the responses. I've had a think about this and in my mind I rationalise combat as follows. In a dog fight it is kill or be killed which is basic survival so I'd have no problem with this. If I was dropping a bomb on an enemy target and the sovereignty of the UK was at risk then again, I'd have no problem with this. However, I'm not sure how to rationalise dropping a bomb on a Taliban target - I know they are thought to be responsible for worldwide terrorist attacks but it seems difficult to rationalise (what I mean is that the sovereignty of the UK or my life is not directly at risk). How do pilots who are serving in Afghanistan rationalise this?
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Old 31st Mar 2010, 05:56
  #128 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
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Age: 50
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I still think you need to fill in an application form and submit it before refining your big interview answers. It just seems to be a good order to do things in.
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Old 31st Mar 2010, 11:56
  #129 (permalink)  
Red On, Green On
 
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ElS - Don't spend too much time second-guessing the Qs.

They want to see you, not your interpretation of what you think they want to see/hear.

LHR -
When asked to define leadership at a commissioning Board interview what would you reply?
It probably won't come out in that form. They are much more likely to ask about a situation where you showed leadership, and how you dealt with the issues than ask you for a dictionary definition of a concept that people have written books about.
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Old 12th Apr 2010, 16:37
  #130 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: UK
Age: 41
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Fleet Air Arm........joining

Just wondering if anyone could answer a few questions that I have on a potential career in the FAA.

1: Is the FAA more or less competitive than the RAF?
2: What sort of aptitude tests would you recommend that I take beforehand to give me even the most basic of ideas of where I'm at?
3: What sort of maths do I need? Is Speed Distance Time the highest level of maths needed or is it exponentially higher?
4: Fundamentally how hard is it to join in your own opinion? Is it a pipedream for most?

regards



P.s I'm 20 not 29, I just threw down any date when I registered here
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Old 12th Apr 2010, 20:27
  #131 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
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The Dark Blues..............

.......................everytime.

You will not regret it.

Good Luck.

TN
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Old 12th Apr 2010, 21:00
  #132 (permalink)  
 
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If your belt unbuckles quickly, go FAA.....



....If not, and you want to be among the best, then RAF it has to be.
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Old 12th Apr 2010, 21:26
  #133 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
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Some googling and looking on the student room forums will easily answer all of those questions. Well maybe not the first one, I don't recall seeing any statistics but for example if you were interested in fast jet statistically you'd have a higher chance in the RAF.

Maths need to be mostly SDT but very fast and efficient. Taking aptitude tests beforehand is pointless as none will emulate the official one. The only preparation you can do really is lots of maths, multitasking and maybe hand-eye -coordination etc playing games/using a joystick. The bottom line is that a tonne of preparation won't do much use if you really don't have the innate skill-set.

Does anyone have any up to date figures for RAF and RN aircrew recruitment? (just for my own interest). It's irrelevant though really you've either got it (and are willing to put in the effort) or you don't, don't let statistics decide.
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Old 12th Apr 2010, 22:52
  #134 (permalink)  
 
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I don't agree with this "you've got it or you've not", there has been a lot of science into brain training which has proven a number of times you can improve your mental abilities.

Last edited by Aerouk; 13th Apr 2010 at 01:17.
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Old 13th Apr 2010, 00:06
  #135 (permalink)  
 
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Have you done the aptitude tests Aero? Having gained competitive scores for every branch after doing a lot of maths preparation I'd certainly say that maths practice helps and is something that you can easily "train" to perform better at.

However a large amount of the aptitude you just couldn't practice without sitting the test itself multiple times. I used a Nintendo DS "brain training" game during my preparation and played a flight sim game with a joystick etc which I certainly would recommend if you don't have flying experience as visualising objects from different perspectives (such as planes) and reading instruments does feature in the testing.
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Old 13th Apr 2010, 01:23
  #136 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: UK.
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However a large amount of the aptitude you just couldn't practice without sitting the test itself
Yeah I would agree with that, it may be very hard to find an exercise that would help you improve the particular skills the RN/RAF are looking for.

Anyway... I heard they just do this test at the test centre

Aircrew Officer Aptitude Test : Careers : Royal Navy
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Old 13th Apr 2010, 11:31
  #137 (permalink)  
Red On, Green On
 
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1: Is the FAA more or less competitive than the RAF?
FAA may well be more competitive for pilot entry than the RAF. About 15-20 months ago a Ppruner scored 120 on pilot aptitude and was unable to make it into the FAA (130 is a realistic min score), but got into the RAF. The actual pass score is 112, by the way. Anything below 125 is looking dodgy for the FAA, though there have been a couple of 118 P scores through to BRNC in the last couple of years.
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Old 13th Apr 2010, 11:45
  #138 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
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See thats the problem. I would rather join the RAF, however my eyesight is -0.25 (the lowest fecking amount of short sightedness that you can get) and the RAF does not allow ANY, so unfortunately it is ruled out.

I'm serious about a flying career and the FAA seems like a logical choice. I was looking at the AAC, but apparently you don't have much of a career with them before you are moved away from the actual "flying"
d1tto is offline  
Old 13th Apr 2010, 15:25
  #139 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: RAF Cranwell
Posts: 33
OASC Bulletin 8

Over the next few weeks, we will be taking a journey through the entire application and selection process from the Armed Forces Careers Office (AFCO) to, in this case, starting Initial Officer Training (IOT). During the journey, we will try to capture as many of the items that we have already submitted in order to contextualize what we have written. Since the publication of this piece the Boarding Process programme has changed. However, the essence of the journey is unchanged and therefore has not been edited.

The Background

The journey starts with an imaginary person, called John, who has just turned 25 years old. He has 10 GCSEs grades A-C (B in Maths), 3 A-Levels grades A-C and a 2:ii degree in Sports Science. John left university at age 21 and has since worked in a department store in his hometown. He applied to the RAF as a pilot just over 2 years ago and, although producing solid aptitude scores, didn’t achieve the standard required in the Exercise Phase of the selection process. Therefore, during his performance review, he was told that he needed to go away and work on his confidence and problem solving skills. To achieve these aims, he was advised to join the Police Specials or a First Response Ambulance Team to help build his confidence around adults and, to improve his problems solving skills, practise distance, speed, distance calculations and try to think more ‘big picture’. However, he was also told that a future application for pilot would not be possible because he would be unable to enter IOT before his 24th birthday; this was disappointing news and caused him to lose interest in a future application.

However, 2 years on, John noticed on the RAF Careers website that the age for pilot had been increased from 23 to 25. As he had just turned 25, he decided to check with the RAF Careers Information Line (CIL) what the new age limit meant; as a result, he was told that the new limit required him to have commenced IOT before his 26th birthday. This gave him a year to re-apply for his dream job, which was just enough time. Although he knew that, theoretically, the entire selection process could take just 6 months, this was a best case scenario and did not leave any flexibility should there be any delays with medical issues or if the IOT dates did not fall right. Also, he noticed on the RAF Careers website how seriously fitness is taken; however, this did not worry him as he ran 5 miles, 3 times per week, and attended the gym a further 3 times. Nevertheless, he noted the Selection Fitness Test (SFT) standards and began work to ensure that he could easily pass this required element, knowing that the SFT was a pass/fail event.

He registered his interest with the CIL and waited for their reply. In the meantime, he continued with his general fitness preparation and increased the amount of research he was undertaking into the RAF, NATO, the UN, current affairs, air power, and the branch that he was applying for - so that he could shine during his interview. Appreciating the short time-line, John also decided to visit his local optometrist to have his eyes thoroughly tested to make sure he was not wasting his time. He decided that he would take his results with him to his officer presentation so that his AFCO could forward his results to OASC should he pass his officer filter interview.

In the next submission, John will complete the initial application process through to attending the OASC at RAF Cranwell.

For more information regarding any of these areas highlighted, please contact your AFCO and they will be able to give you more detailed information regarding specific cases.

Please note that, although OASC will endeavour to answer generic questions that arise, we will not be engaging or commenting on individual cases. In those cases, the individual is advised to contact their nearest AFCO who will be able to deal with any queries. All information published is for information only. Information regarding a career in the RAF can be found at http://www.raf.mod.uk/careers

Last edited by OASC; 8th Jun 2011 at 09:52.
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Old 13th Apr 2010, 17:00
  #140 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: In the sunshine
Age: 42
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RAF Pilot

D1tto

Let the bods at OASC determine if your eyesight is below standards or not. If going by the book, even those who turn up at the AFCO wearing glasses should not routinely be prevented for making an application for pilot. Bottom line - let OASC decide.
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