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Gaining An R.A.F Pilots Brevet In WW II

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Gaining An R.A.F Pilots Brevet In WW II

Old 10th Nov 2017, 22:10
  #11541 (permalink)  
 
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I guess that there would have been a demand in the civilian world for Cranwell educated Royal Air Force aircrew of your age.
Ex Cranwell cut no ice whatsoever. Suitable experience and an ATPL were what counted. This is all a bit off thread.
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Old 11th Nov 2017, 09:45
  #11542 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Danny42C View Post
FED (#11451),

There is a Thread way back on this Forum about Meteor accident statistics in the '50-'51 period. They make sobering reading.

Danny.
A new thread has been created posting the Obit for AM Sir Peter Bairsto

which refers to the Meteor accidents.

As a boy he had dreamt of becoming a pilot. He volunteered to fly in 1944 as soon as he reached 18 and was one of those who braved a high accident rate among those pilots flying early jet fighter aircraft, such as the Gloster Meteor. “Places like [the training establishment at] Driffield were a Meteor bloodbath,” he noted. “At Worksop, where I instructed, we counted on one fatality a month . . . when 43 Squadron converted to the first Hunters we had six serious crashes, including fatalities, in the first six months.”
https://www.pprune.org/showthread.php?t=601757

Last edited by roving; 11th Nov 2017 at 09:57. Reason: SYNTAX
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Old 11th Nov 2017, 16:18
  #11543 (permalink)  
 
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This is the shorter of two of videos about the 1957 Valetta crash I posted about yesterday.

Both created by Norman Doctor, a National Service Soldier posted to KL as a Despatcher. He would have been on the flight save that he had been sent to Changi for training.

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Old 11th Nov 2017, 16:24
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The gravestones of the three aircrew at Cheras Road KL.
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Old 13th Nov 2017, 14:25
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My late father, who served in the RAF 1936-1962, deeply regretted the treatment of Bomber Command after WW2. He maintained that the 55,000-plus lives lost were never acknowledged by many of the self-serving politicians of post-war years, still less by the PC brigade of more recent times.

So I was saddened to see that ex-Lancaster navigator Jim Wright, who flew in 43 wartime raids and won the DFC, says that at 95 he can no longer continue his campaign to recognise the sacrifices of Bomber Command. He has failing vision and struggles to use a computer to send the emails required to keep the campaign going.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/r...8bc6c70f4f79b8
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Old 13th Nov 2017, 14:51
  #11546 (permalink)  
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I blame Churchill. Apart from being the right person for WW11 up to a point at the time before that and after he was a disaster.
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Old 13th Nov 2017, 22:26
  #11547 (permalink)  
 
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I blame the RAF High Command. We had to wait 57 years for a national memorial to be erected to Bomber Command for its long and hard fought campaign, and that thanks primarily to Robin Gibb of the Bee Gees pressing hard for it. No such problem with the BoB Memorials, far more uncontroversial of course...
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Old 16th Nov 2017, 15:23
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I've just heard that the sad news that Aline Dumon, aka "Michou" or "Lily", died at midday today at her home near Uzès in Provence. She was 96. She received the George Medal from the King after the war for her work with the Comet Line.
We had lunch together in Provence 3 years ago and it was clear that she had a streak of determination a mile wide running through her - after all these years.
She loved her 'boys' of the RAF and the USAAF that she led through France and over the Pyrenees (in all weathers) into Spain - and, typical of her modesty, she thought that they were the real heroes, not people like her. She personified the greatest generation.. a life well lived.
RIP Michou.

Here are the two sisters - Andrée (17) and "Michou" (19) - photographed during the war. Both were active in Comet - Andrée was arrested and spent 2 years in Ravensbrück and Mauthausen.
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Old 16th Nov 2017, 16:27
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Ricardian your #11550

Thanks to you for the link to the news of another of those great ATA ladies passing.

Pity that the news was written so poorly - the plural of aircraft (as most here know) is not "aircrafts" and The Spitfire is not, and never was, a "jet".

I wonder - does this writer work for the modern-day BBC?

OK Grumpy old man rant over!

Ian BB
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Old 16th Nov 2017, 16:31
  #11551 (permalink)  
 
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RIP, Madame ... there are not enough words to express thanks, and admiration, for what you did. You crazy brave girl, I salute you!
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Old 16th Nov 2017, 16:38
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Sidevalve, very sad news but thank you for informing us of Michou's passing.

Two girls and their bikes, a combination that spelled doom for Nazi tyranny!

RIP Ma'am. I'll be raising a glass to you tonight.
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Old 16th Nov 2017, 17:01
  #11553 (permalink)  
 
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A truly remarkable Lady.
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Old 16th Nov 2017, 17:04
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Originally Posted by sidevalve View Post
I've just heard that the sad news that Aline Dumon, aka "Michou" or "Lily", died at midday today at her home near Uzès in Provence. She was 96. She received the George Medal from the King after the war for her work with the Comet Line.
We had lunch together in Provence 3 years ago and it was clear that she had a streak of determination a mile wide running through her - after all these years.
She loved her 'boys' of the RAF and the USAAF that she led through France and over the Pyrenees (in all weathers) into Spain - and, typical of her modesty, she thought that they were the real heroes, not people like her. She personified the greatest generation.. a life well lived.
RIP Michou.

Here are the two sisters - Andrée (17) and "Michou" (19) - photographed during the war. Both were active in Comet - Andrée was arrested and spent 2 years in Ravensbrück and Mauthausen.
How fortunate you were sidevalve to have met her and enjoyed her company. Another great Lady.
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Old 16th Nov 2017, 17:26
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ricardian, thanks for the link to The Forces Network piece re Joy Lofthouse, though she deserved better than this abysmal write-up. Any pilot will empathise with those whose job involved taking any type solo, regardless of its size and performance, anywhere within a wartime UK.

Evidently appreciation of the ability of these ATA female pilots was not always that positive, with reception personnel waiting patiently at the foot of the steps for the pilot having made way for a female "helper" who preceded "him".

Checks complete, Captain. RIP.
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Old 16th Nov 2017, 17:40
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Originally Posted by Chugalug2 View Post
ricardian, thanks for the link to The Forces Network piece re Joy Lofthouse, though she deserved better than this abysmal write-up.

Checks complete, Captain. RIP.
As I recall She starred in the very long two (or was it three) part documentary made about the ATA. I think there also a second documentary about the Ladies of the ATA.

Both documentaries are on youtube. I will have a dig around and post links to them.
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Old 16th Nov 2017, 17:44
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Originally Posted by roving View Post
How fortunate you were sidevalve to have met her and enjoyed her company. Another great Lady.
Yes, it really was a privilege.
Pierre Ugeux, her late husband had been the president of Formula One (in the 70s I think) and so for a few years she was whizzed around Europe's racetracks living the high life. She remembered Monaco - with the Rainiers - as being something out of a dream. Her house was full of F1 memorabilia - signed steering wheels from the 'greats', crash helmets, photos, all sorts. Plus she was a real charmer.. She told me her one luxury was 2 glasses of rosé every evening.
A very special lady indeed.
If any PPRuNers find themselves in the vicinity of Uzès cathedral next Tuesday afternoon (2.30pm) and would wish to attend the funeral, you'd be most welcome.
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Old 16th Nov 2017, 17:58
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Originally Posted by sidevalve View Post
Yes, it really was a privilege.
Pierre Ugeux, her late husband had been the president of Formula One (in the 70s I think) and so for a few years she was whizzed around Europe's racetracks living the high life. She remembered Monaco - with the Rainiers - as being something out of a dream. Her house was full of F1 memorabilia - signed steering wheels from the 'greats', crash helmets, photos, all sorts. Plus she was a real charmer.. She told me her one luxury was 2 glasses of rosé every evening.
A very special lady indeed.
If any PPRuNers find themselves in the vicinity of Uzès cathedral next Tuesday afternoon (2.30pm) and would wish to attend the funeral, you'd be most welcome.
It would be wonderful to be there sidevalve, but alas I cannot be.

This is link of a photograph of her and Pierre Ugeux in uniform during the war.

Last Best Hope: A True Story of Escape, Evasion, and Remembrance
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Old 16th Nov 2017, 18:46
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Last edited by roving; 16th Nov 2017 at 18:56.
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Old 16th Nov 2017, 21:29
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More on "Michou" here, including the story how she'd initially been recommended for 'just' an MBE after the war - until the Awards Bureau realised just how much she'd achieved - when it was upgraded to the GM.

Edited to add: This column from The Washington Post briefly touches on how "Michou" (aka "Lily") nursed Bob Grimes (a B-17 aircraft commander) back to health in Brussels over a 5-6 week period in late 1943 after he'd had a fragment of a bullet removed (without anaesthetic) from his leg.
The full story of how she looked after Bob is revealed in Peter Eisner's book The Freedom Line. (well worth a read)
Bob was lucky to survive the ill-advised crossing of the river Bidassoa that cost 2nd Lt Jim Burch and Count Antoine d'Ursel their lives.
Bob's daughters have come here twice now to retrace their father's footsteps.

Last edited by sidevalve; 16th Nov 2017 at 21:51. Reason: Added link.
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