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Hearing loss

Old 18th Oct 2023, 05:44
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Hearing loss

Hello everyone. Itís Caner.

I have a bilateral hearing loss of 50 decibels at a frequency of 3000Hz in both ears. Additionally, there's a 40 decibel loss at 4000Hz and a 35 decibel loss at 2000Hz. I don't even have my PPL yet. I noticed this during the initial tests, wanting to ensure my health before becoming a commercial pilot and avoiding future financial loss. The aviation doctor advised me to see an ENT specialist, warning that it could be costly and to reconsider if it's a progressive condition. The ENT specialist mentioned it as a pre-existing damage likely from exposure to high noise levels. They stated it won't improve, but it's not a progressive condition. Now, do you think I can undergo training in flight schools with my Class 1 certificate and later join an airline? Could I risk losing my license if my hearing loss worsens? Are there specific options for cases like mine? I'm very curious about the experiences of someone in a similar situation. In your opinion, should I give up on my dreams?
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Old 21st Dec 2023, 09:26
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A Class 1 medical certificate is typically required for commercial pilots, and hearing standards can vary among aviation authorities. Given your hearing loss, it's commendable that you proactively addressed the issue during initial tests. Consulting with an aviation medical examiner (AME) and adhering to their recommendations is a crucial step
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Old 14th Jan 2024, 12:11
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I think it is a risk especially if you are going ATPL. Above make sure that you eligible for the certificate.
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Old 1st Feb 2024, 10:07
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Originally Posted by ptcaner
Hello everyone. Itís Caner.

I have a bilateral hearing loss of 50 decibels at a frequency of 3000Hz in both ears. Additionally, there's a 40 decibel loss at 4000Hz and a 35 decibel loss at 2000Hz. I don't even have my PPL yet. I noticed this during the initial tests, wanting to ensure my health before becoming a commercial pilot and avoiding future financial loss. The aviation doctor advised me to see an ENT specialist, warning that it could be costly and to reconsider if it's a progressive condition. The ENT specialist mentioned it as a pre-existing damage likely from exposure to high noise levels. They stated it won't improve, but it's not a progressive condition. Now, do you think I can undergo training in flight schools with my Class 1 certificate and later join an airline? Could I risk losing my license if my hearing loss worsens? Are there specific options for cases like mine? I'm very curious about the experiences of someone in a similar situation. In your opinion, should I give up on my dreams?
Did you get a class1 issued or not?
once youve got the initial class1, the reval is much more leniant. in fact i dontknow anyone whos lost a class 1 due hearing.
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Old 1st Feb 2024, 10:49
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Wow, that is a huge hearing loss ! My sympathy. Hopefully you have an outer or middle ear problem that can be fixed.

Well done though for doing things this way round - you MUST gain an initial CAA/EASA Class 1 medical before going any further along the road to becoming a commercial pilot.


As a warning to others; Hearing loss, and damage to the inner ear due to exposure to loud sound is permanent and cannot be repaired. And you feel no pain while the damage is being done. So be careful with headphones, power tools, rock concerts, and doing walk-arounds without hearing protection. I have a set of slim Peltor ear defenders that fold up to something the size of my fists held together, so they easily fit into my flight bag.

Some lads who were breaking up a concrete floor for me, with very loud heavy breaker tools; had no ear protection at all, and they refused my offer of some ear defenders. They presumably thought ear defenders were cissy - but once damaged, that sort of hearing loss cannot be fixed.

Any ringing in the ears after loud sounds is bad and is a warning of damage being done.

Good luck
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Old 15th May 2024, 09:43
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Hi.
Long story short. I'm like you; I have bilateral hearing loss and tinnitus brought on by too much clubbing as a youngster and too much playing with high explosives during my more grown-up years. I applied to Generation Easy Jet a few years ago and got an offer and place on a course on completion of my class 1 medical. Shock horror, I failed the hearing test. But passed with flying colours (excuse the pun), everything else. At the time, I held a PPL, class 2 medical, unrestricted and around 120 hours of flight time flown in constricted airspace under radar control.

As mentioned, once you lose your hearing, there is nothing you can do to get it back. It's gone. And the chances are that the degradation in your hearing will worsen as time passes; age-related hearing loss is a real possibility. My conversation with the AME and CAA medical department at the time revolved around the fact that I already had a license and medical. Therefore, I could be assessed while wearing hearing aids. The end result was that they denied my class 1. Which at the end of the day, was the right call for my long-term health and protection of my hearing.

The AME was very down-to-earth and honest with me. He said if I was just a revalidation of my class 1, wearing hearing aids wouldn't be an issue. However, because it is an initial class 1, hearing aids would not be accepted. He mentioned most people who wear hearing aids manage fine on the flight deck; they turn the volume up on radios. Modern hearing aids are getting better and better. Mine fit inside my ear canal, and you can only see them if you're looking for them; I can Bluetooth my phone to them, and I love listening to Spotify in boring meetings.

Now, to answer your question, should you give up on your dream? Never give up on it. Go try to get your class 1 and see what happens. But maybe delay your training until you have qualifications in a secondary job field so that should the worst happen, you can start a second career.

Things for you to think about.
1: Aviation is a noisy business. You'll be exposed to high-frequency noise that can further damage your hearing.
2: Trust me, you don't want to lose your hearing at a young age. The effect on your mental health is huge! Untreated hearing loss can cause the early onset of dementia, anxiety and a whole raft of horrible side effects.
3: Wear hearing protection in any noisy environment.
4: Go get fitted for hearing aids; you'll be amazed at the sounds you can no longer hear that hearing aids will allow you to hear again.

Good luck in what ever you decide to do.
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