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Combined Hearing and audiogram thread

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Combined Hearing and audiogram thread

Old 10th Sep 2006, 15:22
  #1 (permalink)  
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Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: UK
Posts: 83
Combined Hearing and audiogram thread

I sat their in depth medical on friday, to get told I had bad hearing damamge, and also becausie I had a cold, I could resit the audiogram someitme in future, however if I delay much longer will definitley not get a placement on next Flight attendant training course.

I've just turned 40 , and the doc told me I was in fine physical shape otherwise, 20/20 eyesight, good lungs, BP flexibility etc etc..........

At times he showed my my hearing appears to dip down to 65 which is unacceptable? I"m confused as I've been working as a flight attendant for the best part of 12 years, mainly overseas.

My question is- is there anything i can do to influence the audiogram, I fear,however feel its foolproof. Would I have any form of redress, that I could use to influece the outcome, seeing as I am looking at a refusal of employment after getting so far in the process. My day to day hearings fine, its just the high frequency tone is damaged-this is so annoying!

Anyone elso out there experience this, and what have they done?

Thanks in advance
mooguy is offline  
Old 22nd Sep 2006, 00:18
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At the risk of stating the obvious, did they have a look and made sure there were not oodles of wax in your ears?

Beyond that go and see your GP so they can have a look. If it was due to a cold (not uncommon) then you may well be OK on a repeat test.

If not it may be worthwhile to go and see an ENT surgeon to ensure there is nothing wrong further up the line. A disqualifying hearing loss for a youngster is unusual and warrants a closer look.

Not sure what you mean by a redress of the situation?

Would have thought that they would struggle not to take you on if the hearing could be rectified with a hearing aid etc. They can probably justify that you would a reasonable amount of hearing to do the job as flight cabins are a fairly noisy environment.

They don't just want you to be able to hear what the punters and the tannoy says, they also have a duty to protect you from your hearing loss getting worse.

Two sides to the coin, as ever.

Best of luck.

FD
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Old 27th Sep 2006, 04:11
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Angel High Frequency hearing loss

just to reply to your last post. Basically I have, and this isnt the first time, failed an audiogram as my one on one hearing is great, but the softer sounds, high frequency is damamged.

Several year ago i got a job with aer lingus, and failed their audiogram. I went to see a top ENT freind of my father's, who wrote out a convincing letter to them, saying that were they worried that flying with them could further damage my hearing?? That sealed it for me, and I subsequently got the job, thats what I meant by a form of redress.

I went to an independt audiometrist the following week, and this time the results were much better and this seems to have pleased the QF doc-who knows tho, still havent been offered the job yet. Basically the second specialits audiogram did show I had high frequency damage, but no where near bad enought to need a hearing aid, and no-where near as bad as the QF one! So i stay away from Rock concerts, loud music etc these days, and hope for the best!
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Old 27th Sep 2006, 06:10
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Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Fliegensville, Gold Coast Australia
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I am almost completly deaf (97%) right ear - everything else OK

Sat in their Audio box and just hit the button around when I thought I should hear something in my right ear

Was all I could do to keep myself from laughing my head off. The Audio Ladies face....
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Old 27th Sep 2006, 20:10
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Join Date: Jun 2006
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Lightbulb One solution:

Greetings!
Im no doctor, but I got a tiny bit of personal experience.. My advice is that you try out the easy parts in the preavious posts before you do any of the more extreme things. Clearing out excessive wax and such is a good idea. Then simply:

Plug your ears in the morning of your next test-day. Silence and reduction in sounds around you will sharpen your hearing a lot! I used this trick in my military days due to all the noise and sounds around me..and it worked! Just remember to remove the plugs before you put on the audiometric headphones.

Best of Luck,
TJB
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Old 29th Jan 2009, 18:44
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Join Date: Dec 2008
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I donīt know man but I had a cold and a week after I flew with Ryanair. Man it was the moast painfull experience in my life. I couldnīt hear and it fellt like there was a knife in my ear or something. I am a strong person and I never cry but belive me, I wanted to cry there.

A feew weeks have past now and I want to go up for training but I still canīt pop my ear so I will have to whait.

I wouldnīt reccomend the flight if you arnīt sure. It could give you big problems. So go to a doctor even if there isnīt much time left.

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Old 29th Jan 2009, 19:15
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Join Date: Sep 2006
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I'm not in a very different situation. About over a month ago, almost two, I had a terrible cold and cough. Since then and till now I've had a blocked ear. Doctor thought it was sinusitis but the x-ray proved it wrong. I'm right now just using sprays and a tablet to try and make the mucus stuck on, possibly, the Eustachian tube liquid and cough it out but it doesn't seem to help. It does also cause a "ringing noise" in my ears.
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Old 29th Jan 2009, 19:29
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The worst that's going to happen is that you will burst an ear drum.......unlikely but a problem if it occurs.

The best case scenario......ride of a life time.


Hmmmm, I know what I'd do
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Old 30th Jan 2009, 21:51
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Qantas audiogram exclusion criteria!

Hello there! I just read your post - I know you posted it a while back but I could have wept!

Please get in touch - I've got to know how this worked out. I am in the same boat!

I've got an interview with Qantas but I also have very mild bilateral hearing loss from a bloody cold I had in 2004! I can't hear in the high end of the upper frequency region.

It has no effect on me day to day and I totally forget I even have a problem. I don't wear a hearing aid and the one I tried just annoyed me!

Did you get the job in the end? If you didn't, do you have any idea what Qantas' policy is on audiogram exclusion criteria?

Many thanks

[email protected]
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Old 1st Feb 2009, 18:06
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Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Not in dreamland any more.
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History of Hearing Problems...Need Help?

This is how it is:

I have had a history of hearing problems as a child and has been given many sets of grommets for my ears which has fallen out as i got older, i have 100% hearing in my left ear and 40% hearing in my right ear, when i blow my nose i get this dizziness but this is all caused from my bad ear (my left) im pretty certain that i will need another grommet in my ear as this is a 'balance' issue,

Im scared that the doctor will link this to vertigo for the time being until it gets sorted, and i know that vertigo doesnt go down well with a PPL medical,

If i can OVERCOME this hearing problem and prove that my hearing is good again after being fixed, will my history of hearing stop me from passing the hearing standards for the CLASS 2 medical (i only want to be a ppl, nothing more).

Just that i want to train for my PPL and cant fly solo / gain a PPL license without this medical certificate, i am in top notch health with everything exept this bad ear, which i know the ENT will sort out.

Or is my flying dream all over?

Does a medical history overide current health?

Thankyou

Alex
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Old 2nd Feb 2009, 14:15
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Do you have an ENT Surgeon that you feel comfortable with?

I would recommend the ENT Dept. at Essex County Hospital Lexden Rd - or - The Royal Throat, Nose + Ear hospital in King's Cross.

If you're happy with the current ENT, that's fine - but the 2 hospitals above will give you an accurate diagnosis and have a good reputation.
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Old 2nd Feb 2009, 14:18
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Join Date: Dec 2003
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You guys need to put the word 'eustachian' into the search bar - there are many threads. If you don't have a history of tube problems and are struggling to clear an ear after an infection, ask your Dr for a 'mucolytic' - try a search on that term as well - there are a few to try, with minimal side effects.
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Old 2nd Feb 2009, 23:59
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Protecting your hearing.

I was wondering if any of the pilots on here actively protect your hearing in loud environments, like concerts, festivals, airshows, etc? If your ears go bad, I would imagine attaining a class one medical would be harder or maybe even impossible?
I brought some musicians earplugs but they are too big and hurt my ears, I was thinking of getting custom ones molded to the shape of my ear.
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Old 3rd Feb 2009, 00:25
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Good advice

Even when I was younger (old now ) I used to wear earplugs at concerts, bands, etc.

Main reason then was that it used to sh1t me when I'd leave a concert and not being able to hear anything until I woke up the next day. I found that the only effect was that the music wasn't painful. (i.e. you could hear the same; just without the pain )

I found that the yellow foam ones were best; and if you cut them in half, no-one else knew you were wearing them (made it hard to get them out, though)

Many of my friends (same concerts) now have hearing difficulties, where my hearing is still very good.

DIVOSH!
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Old 3rd Feb 2009, 00:30
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I've got some Speedo brand swimming ear-plugs which work well. They need to be moistioned before inserting though (no pun intended ) They go in quite deep and have a little "handle" to pull them out with.

Other than that pick up some of the foam ones (Bunnings perhaps) that you squash first then insert in your ear. They usually have a daggy plastic cord on them but you can just cut that off.

Be weary of wearing flouro coloured plugs to a concert at night as the UV/Blacklight will make them glow and you'll look like a tool.
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Old 3rd Feb 2009, 00:34
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I was once told this about NZ. Not a single Pilot in NZ has ever had their medical pulled based solely on hearing loss. Heck I've meet one pilot who could barely hear someone speak to him across the room but had no probs in the aircraft (just turn up the headset volume )
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Old 3rd Feb 2009, 00:47
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I say protect your hearing....not to keep your medical. In old age, you don't want your wife and relatives shouting at you OR, worse, talking about you--in front of you. Very depressing thought.

GF
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Old 3rd Feb 2009, 01:00
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A DC-3 skipper with MMA lost his, he said, hanging his head out of his Mustang during run ups in his RAAF Korean days. F/O didn't need his headset. He heard everything through the captain's.
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Old 3rd Feb 2009, 01:08
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Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: New Zealand
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I agree with Galaxy Flyer - do it for your ears, not your license (although if it were to stop you losing the license, that's an added benefit). The number of people who aren't that old, but have hearing loss because they didn't bother to protect their ears is kind of sad in a way. But you don't have to wear earmuffs everywhere of course.
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Old 3rd Feb 2009, 02:05
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Join Date: Nov 2000
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My noise deafness is bad enough that on initial Class 1 I got a letter from Dr Ruth? at the dept advising me to consider a career outside aviation. Skip forward a quarter of a century and a phone call to a Dr in Canberra got the response "well you can hear me can't you?".

As mentioned modern radios/intercoms have a knob(s) which fixes the problem

On the positive side noise deafness affects mainly the frequencies of:
- angry adult female
- screaming babies/kids
- wife talking about an expensive thing that (from the pictures) goes in the ear and uses batteries
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