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-   -   Gliding - now I get it (https://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/636674-gliding-now-i-get.html)

LapSap 28th Dec 2020 21:15


Originally Posted by lederhosen (Post 10923180)
As an enthusiastic glider pilot (lucky enough to fly an Arcus M) I have recently discovered some you tube videos by Stefan Langer. There are a couple of him flying 1000km through my area in southern Germany as well as some beach flying in New Zealand that was quite literally unbelievable. Modern gliders are so efficient that in good conditions you rarely need to stop and turn in lift, but just speed up through the sink and then zoom climb in the lift. Stefan's video is mostly speeded up so it looks strange to see the vario mainly indicating sink but him maintaining or increasing height, as the short time pulling up barely registers. If you have a few minutes to spare I can thoroughly recommend them. It looks effortless, but I can assure you it is not. It is however indicative of what is possible.

Thanks for the recommendation to view Stefan Langer’s channel- some fantastic videos on there.
Fairly modest kind of guy with great skills.

Loose rivets 29th Dec 2020 03:58


The Hangar has been made a trifle wider,
At Much Binding in the Marsh
We did it to accommodate our glider
Our pilot said he'd like to try it out as it was new,
We took him up ten thousand feet and then we waved a-dieu,
He came down six months later to the north of Katman-du from Much Binding in the Marsh.

From Admiral Draper's thread way back when. You have to be old to set this to music. I can hear them singing it now. 1944 - 1954


pasta 29th Dec 2020 09:30


Originally Posted by Innominate (Post 10951119)
I've never been shouted at, but there was an instructor who clearly was able to think much faster than I could - he gave an almost constant stream of patter and before I'd responded to one instruction he would have given at least one further instruction and be starting on a third. In the end my wife and I decided that if he was the Duty Instructor we'd go shopping instead

Sounds a lot like an instructor I flew with; if you weren't already overloaded by the flying, the constant stream of instruction, advice, explanations and the odd anecdote would do the trick. Things improved considerably when I discovered he responded to the command "Shut Up!" without taking any offence; thereafter I flew with him quite frequently and learned a lot.

blind pew 29th Dec 2020 14:38

IGNORANCE OF OTHER DISCIPLINES
In the late 70s I was instructing on Condors out of Blackbushe. A very lively tailwheel aircraft which nearly took me out whilst stuck in a spin with a pupil.
Along comes a trail lesson in the shape of a glider pilot from Lasham who had done some power flying which had ended in a Stalagluft 30 odd years before. I still cringe at having said you are doing well considering the last time you flew power.
My daytime job was flying VC10s.
I had flown gliders a few years before but they were no where as demanding as early starships which were far more difficult to fly.

I discovered radio control aircraft to teach my son to fly..far more expensive than full size and several levels up on difficulty margins. I said many times if I die flying it will be from a heart attack whilst flying a model aircraft.

Glider aerobatics are far more difficult than those in power aircraft and more costly unless you happen to have a nice ridge, a club DG 505 and the mistral as at St.Remy en Provence. It is about management of energy and not brute force.

The club has the endurance record of 57 hours but after a couple of sleepy pilots crashed night flying was banned.

Paragliding and Hang gliding are two other extremely skilled and often costly flying disciplines with cross country distances of over 500km..regular altitude gains of 15,000ft with some going up to 20,000+.. two years ago there were 50 odd pilots who landed on the summit of Mont Blanc but one messed his launch up and the Gendarmes stopped further landings.
The problem with this general ignorance is that there are always know all know nothings who like to have their opinions heard which is why I have several thousand hours paragliding as I do not have to belong to a club and listen to these fellows (I belong to two at the moment but fly alone).
I occasionally requalify on gliders to fly my grandkids but at a professional club with a CFI who knows me and accepts my judgement.
As to a couple of willy waving comments you obviously are of the démena with a narrow comfort zone...it takes all types and there is a place for everyone in aviation..except for high G spiral dives I will not do aerobatics with a paraglider..hundreds do..and whilst many think they are mad it’s about skill level. What I do do is climb mountains and fly over unknown terrain to where ever the wind takes me...something a lot of pilots are frightened of.

​​

Krystal n chips 31st Dec 2020 11:08

BP,

I'll come to the mortifyingly bad news in a moment.

However, some friends, and myself, would be interested in learning how you changed the launch procedures please .

Now, steady yourself here.

You referred to a PS at Bicester, and also mentioned the term " thicko " regarding his response to your conversation. Could, therefore, this by any chance the same PS who today can put MBE after his name ?.

I know, with your own modesty in mind, a travesty, and it's clearly evident the honours system is flawed because surely by now, a knighthood, or higher still, should have been awarded for your contribution to gliding.

PR0PWASH 10th Jan 2021 13:04


Originally Posted by VP959 (Post 10923135)
My first ever flight was in a Sedburgh. RAF Halton in the mid-1960s, as a cadet. Never forgotten it. The thing that I remember most clearly about that flight is the wire launch, and the wind noise. For some reason I can't remember the circuit at all.


Mine too, what sticks in my memory was the bloke climbing into the fuselage behind the seats who upon me asking replied he was checking for woodworm, I still don't know if he was joking

P.S. THIS was about 1979 though, so I guess it was pretty tired old airframe by then, it certainly didnt stay up very long, I think a circuit as most people know one was about the the things limit of endurance in still air off a Landie winch launch

OldCessna 10th Jan 2021 17:14

Done this ridge a few times and its full of challenges


rich34glider 11th Jan 2021 03:51


Originally Posted by OldCessna (Post 10964970)
Done this ridge a few times and its full of challenges

https://youtu.be/u7UiGhArft0

Yes, some risky challenges accepted right there .. hope you don't stick a wing into a rock (or a person) one day.

blind pew 11th Jan 2021 10:06

A good « British » video
 

French definition of mountain flying is below the crests...only remark is that I kept away from ski areas as they can be littered with wires used to slide explosive charges to trigger avalanches. I was at a Vinon Comp when a local found one.
Although it looks dangerous, with the right training it isn’t as long as you avoid the holiday periods when hundreds descend to the Alps Maritine as the risk of a head on ridge running gets high..closing speeds of 200 knots at times.


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