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-   -   An alternative browser (https://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/623437-alternative-browser.html)

Grayfly 11th Jul 2019 11:26

An alternative browser
 
I came across a new'ish web browser called Brave which claims to be faster, more secure, blocks ads and trackers. Free and open source.

Is anyone here using it or tried it?

Any good?

lomapaseo 11th Jul 2019 12:19

I'm not brave enough to try it

UniFoxOs 11th Jul 2019 14:20

Was it written by Indians?

arketip 11th Jul 2019 15:02


Originally Posted by UniFoxOs (Post 10515944)
Was it written by Indians?

Even worse, Americans

Clay_T 12th Jul 2019 02:01

It's built on Google's Chromium open source browser.
Google has already locked up their Chrome API so third party ad blockers can't completely block advertising.

They are looking at ways to do the same with Chromium.
Even though it is open source, Google still have some hooks in Chromium.
There's talk of forking Chromium to try and break Google's stronghold on it.
Google have deep pockets and a strong desire not to lose that revenue stream, so it will be a fight.

I'm too new here to post links.
Have a look around on the web site boingboing.
Lots of info there on Google and Chrome.

Grayfly 12th Jul 2019 08:27

I thought I would try it so downloaded it on to one of my machines.

So far I'm impressed. It does appear to run faster and no adds appearing on any sites I normally see them.

It not surprisingly does all the stuff that Chrome does and gives details on adds and trackers blocked.

I'll keep the trial going for a while.

atakacs 12th Jul 2019 08:51

Brave is pretty good but remember to contribute in their donation model. Otherwise it will not work out.

Another choice would be the Gab browser...

Octane 12th Jul 2019 09:33

I have become a bit apprehensive using Google/ Chrome. I doubt there is any sort of privacy, security or even honesty any longer, if there ever was, when using the internet.
A recent example using Chrome;
I was interested in going to Bali so checked out flights on the website of the airline I use. A little while later I went to the Washington Post website for news only to be bombarded by ads for flights to Bali (same airline), that took forever to load on whatever page the story I was trying to read was on. So I guess Google is passing on (selling?) cookies describing my browsing history to 3rd parties and grabbing a pay per click fee on the way? So much for private browsing. Where else is my browsing history going? What happens when I do online banking?
I've also noticed that it is becoming increasingly difficult to find relevant search results, they get demoted down below paid results. For example, if I search the name of a hotel I want to stay at, it probably won't even be on the first page of the results. It will be below the hordes of crap travel sites that are taking over the planet. Hype is overtaking reality.
Phone apps are a big worry. Some of the permissions we give away may on the face of it be required for the app to operate, but there is nothing to stop say Farcebook selling/ utilising our phone book in ways we never imagined when we signed up. An example, recently I created a LinkedIn profile using a newly created email address and NOT divulging my phone number. Soon after I got several suggested contact notifications from LinkedIn, some I had not contacted in decades and not related to my working life. Later I realised what those people had in common was they were in my phone contact list. It would seem somehow LinkedIn has access to the contents of my mobile phone and reverse looked up phone numbers on their data base? Whatever, however it's been done, despite the benefits of the digital world, privacy is certainly most definitely not one of them..

Sallyann1234 12th Jul 2019 09:46

Microsoft bought LinkedIn so that anything you do on there can be merged with its own data. If you are using Windows then it already has your address list.

DaveReidUK 12th Jul 2019 09:59


Originally Posted by Sallyann1234 (Post 10516597)
Microsoft bought LinkedIn so that anything you do on there can be merged with its own data. If you are using Windows then it already has your address list.

Presumably only if you have been daft enough to share your contact list with LinkedIn ?

Sallyann1234 12th Jul 2019 10:07

MS already knows which of your Windows contacts are on LinkedIn.

parabellum 12th Jul 2019 13:14

https://www.slimbrowser.net/

Been using this without complaint for a while, works for me but I am no Geek.

DaveReidUK 12th Jul 2019 15:12


Originally Posted by Sallyann1234 (Post 10516625)
MS already knows which of your Windows contacts are on LinkedIn.

Now I'm even more confused.

How does MS know who I have in my Windows contact list ? Has it been hacking into my PC ?

VP959 12th Jul 2019 15:21


Originally Posted by DaveReidUK (Post 10516879)
Now I'm even more confused.

How does MS know who I have in my Windows contact list ? Has it been hacking into my PC ?

Did you read the Terms and Conditions that Microsoft made you agree to when you first started/installed Windows?

If so, then you'll remember that you agreed to let Microsoft access every single file and bit of data on your PC, and send it back to their servers as they wish. It's one of the ways that Microsoft use to monetise Windows now, they make money from your data.

This are the relevant clauses in the Ts and Cs for Windows 10, for example (if you don't agree to this you can't use Windows):


“Microsoft collects information about you, your devices, applications and networks, and your use of those devices, applications and networks. Examples of data we collect include your name, email address, preferences and interests; browsing, search and file history; phone call and SMS data; device configuration and sensor data; and application usage.”

“We may collect information about your device and applications and use it for purposes such as determining or improving compatibility” and “use voice input features like speech-to-text, we may collect voice information and use it for purposes such as improving speech processing.”

“If you open a file, we may collect information about the file, the application used to open the file, and how long it takes any use [of] it for purposes such as improving performance, or [if you] enter text, we may collect typed characters, we may collect typed characters and use them for purposes such as improving autocomplete and spell check features.”

DaveReidUK 12th Jul 2019 15:50


Originally Posted by VP959 (Post 10516885)
Did you read the Terms and Conditions that Microsoft made you agree to when you first started/installed Windows?

If so, then you'll remember that you agreed to let Microsoft access every single file and bit of data on your PC, and send it back to their servers as they wish. It's one of the ways that Microsoft use to monetise Windows now, they make money from your data.

This are the relevant clauses in the Ts and Cs for Windows 10, for example (if you don't agree to this you can't use Windows):

Yes, I vaguely remember ticking a box that covers that kind of stuff (it's a while since I installed Windows on any PC). But (a) that doesn't appear to extend to the right to hijack my contact list, and (b) I can't see any mechanism that would enable MS to do so without my knowledge.

Granted, if I used freebie MS web mail (Hotmail/Outlook.com, or whatever it's called this week), but I don't.

VP959 12th Jul 2019 16:03


Originally Posted by DaveReidUK (Post 10516906)
Yes, I vaguely remember ticking a box that covers that kind of stuff (it's a while since I installed Windows on any PC). But (a) that doesn't appear to extend to the right to hijack my contact list, and (b) I can't see any mechanism that would enable MS to do so without my knowledge.

Granted, if I used freebie MS web mail (Hotmail/Outlook.com, or whatever it's called this week), but I don't.

Agreeing to the terms and conditions grants Microsoft the right to look at any file you open on your machine, be it an email, spreadsheet, document or whatever. As soon as you open any application, Microsoft has the right to collect data from that application, even down to logging keystrokes from your keyboard if they wish.

That means that everything that appears on your screen, including your contact list, file listings or whatever can, in principle, be accessed by Microsoft. Whether they do access all the data they have a right to I don't know, I suspect that data telemetry is fairly limited to stuff they can make money from, or use to improve the way their stuff works (from their perspective, rather than the users).

DaveReidUK 12th Jul 2019 16:25

This article on the MS website would suggest that keylogging was in the preview version of W10 (for perfectly understandable reasons and as a quid pro quo), but is not in the production version.

VP959 12th Jul 2019 16:35


Originally Posted by DaveReidUK (Post 10516930)
This article on the MS website would suggest that keylogging was in the preview version of W10 (for perfectly understandable reasons and as a quid pro quo), but is not in the production version.

Keylogging was over-hyped by some as an issue, but Microsoft doesn't need detailed keylogging to gather data about users, including emails, email addresses (including address books), data from user files etc, as that's explicitly included within the rights granted to them by users. TBH, I doubt that many users bother to read through the dozens of pages of terms and conditions before agreeing to them. It seems that many people just click on agree without even glancing at them.

DaveReidUK 12th Jul 2019 16:55

Microsoft Privacy Statement (June 2019)

VP959 12th Jul 2019 17:08

You can also now sort of see what Microsoft are doing in the background with their Windows Diagnostic Data Viewer. I'm not convinced that this shows everything though, as last time I did a check on traffic from a Windows PC, using Wireshark, there was a surprisingly large amount of data traffic to and from several Microsoft servers, even with all the Windows privacy options set. Impossible to tell for sure what all that data was, but roughly 2/3rds of it was going to known ad-related servers, and this was on a machine that was running an ad blocker and (IIRC) Firefox, rather than Edge.


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