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NoelEvans 20th Aug 2019 21:00


Originally Posted by Sallyann1234 (Post 10550049)
None our business. We're leaving the EU, remember?

You are totally correct. But there's no harm in having a good laugh at something that's not your business! Especially when, like Belgium, Brussels is at the centre of it!!

Ahhh! The 'harmony' at the centre of 'the 27'!

KelvinD 20th Aug 2019 21:11

It seems to me that, should the Good Friday Agreement be disrupted, it will be the EU that will be responsible for that. The UK government has said, repeatedly, that they will not be erecting, installing or operating a "hard" border. We know the EU have said that this so-called "hard" border will come about if the backstop nonsense is not implemented. So, the EU will be responsible for any damage to the GFA but UK will get the blame for it. I heard an Irish politician on Radio 4 this morning telling us how a border control relying on technology, pre-clearing etc can't work and doesn't exist anywhere in the world. I watched an interesting feature on the BBC not too long ago, showing how just such a border exists and operates quite well between Norway & Sweden. I think the only way to stop politicians lying to us it to rip their tongues out!

Una Due Tfc 20th Aug 2019 21:20

So BoJo says there’ll be an end to free movement on November 1st, but there’ll be no hard border on the British side because he wants to continue with the CTA between ROI and UK.

Okay lets unpick this one. Let's take the most ignorant situation put forward by the Mail, Express etc. Just say I’m a Romanian gypsy or Latvian drug dealer who still wants to move to the UK. I’m perfectly entitled to fly to Dublin no questions asked. How does the UK stop me getting up to Belfast then getting the ferry to Britain with no hard border?

The most practical answer is to make a backstop specific to Northern Ireland. Have the checks at the ports in NI. This is exactly what the original backstop was before the DUP threatened to bring down May, and the UK wide backstop was then proposed by...Dominic Raab ( but somehow it’s “undemocratic”). What Borris currently proposes is simply impossible. Either he needs to compromise or he needs to throw the DUP under the bus.

Una Due Tfc 20th Aug 2019 21:23


Originally Posted by KelvinD (Post 10550153)
It seems to me that, should the Good Friday Agreement be disrupted, it will be the EU that will be responsible for that. The UK government has said, repeatedly, that they will not be erecting, installing or operating a "hard" border. We know the EU have said that this so-called "hard" border will come about if the backstop nonsense is not implemented. So, the EU will be responsible for any damage to the GFA but UK will get the blame for it. I heard an Irish politician on Radio 4 this morning telling us how a border control relying on technology, pre-clearing etc can't work and doesn't exist anywhere in the world. I watched an interesting feature on the BBC not too long ago, showing how just such a border exists and operates quite well between Norway & Sweden. I think the only way to stop politicians lying to us it to rip their tongues out!

You do know that border closes at night right? And there’s a fraction as many crossing points as there are between ROI and NI? There’s 11 crossing points between Norway and Sweden, there’s literally hundreds between NI and ROI.

Oh and both Norway and Sweden are part of Schengen...

Sallyann1234 20th Aug 2019 21:31


Originally Posted by KelvinD (Post 10550153)
It seems to me that, should the Good Friday Agreement be disrupted, it will be the EU that will be responsible for that. The UK government has said, repeatedly, that they will not be erecting, installing or operating a "hard" border. We know the EU have said that this so-called "hard" border will come about if the backstop nonsense is not implemented. So, the EU will be responsible for any damage to the GFA but UK will get the blame for it. I heard an Irish politician on Radio 4 this morning telling us how a border control relying on technology, pre-clearing etc can't work and doesn't exist anywhere in the world. I watched an interesting feature on the BBC not too long ago, showing how just such a border exists and operates quite well between Norway & Sweden. I think the only way to stop politicians lying to us it to rip their tongues out!

I can't be bothered to find it now but there was a report linked on here some time ago by a senior person involved in that border who was convinced that their arrangement couldn't work in Ireland.

But we'll find out soon enough what the Brexit consequences are for Ireland.

Fly Aiprt 20th Aug 2019 21:40


Originally Posted by KelvinD (Post 10550153)
So, the EU will be responsible for any damage to the GFA but UK will get the blame for it.

I'm afraid you got things the wrong way around ;-)

You might want to get information about the subject
https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-northern-ireland-42412972
Former US Senator George Mitchell helped broker the Good Friday Agreement in 1998 :

He said Brexit was a "democratically taken decision which therefore must be respected" but felt that "it will historically prove to be a major error on the part of the people of the UK".The consequences of Brexit on the island of Ireland could prove to be more intense and negative than in England, Scotland and Wales, he added.



Sallyann1234 20th Aug 2019 21:41


Originally Posted by NoelEvans (Post 10550144)
You are totally correct. But there's no harm in having a good laugh at something that's not your business! Especially when, like Belgium, Brussels is at the centre of it!!

By all means laugh at them while you can. I think we know who will be having the last laugh.

Fly Aiprt 20th Aug 2019 21:54


Originally Posted by Una Due Tfc (Post 10550159)
You do know that border closes at night right? And there’s a fraction as many crossing points as there are between ROI and NI? There’s 11 crossing points between Norway and Sweden, there’s literally hundreds between NI and ROI.

Oh and both Norway and Sweden are part of Schengen...

Our friend surely knows that and must have a practical proposition for implementing an agreements a la Schengen between the territories in question.
We'll be much interested in reading the detailed explanations.



Fly Aiprt 20th Aug 2019 22:14


Originally Posted by Sallyann1234 (Post 10550173)
By all means laugh at them while you can. I think we know who will be having the last laugh.

He who is fond of laughing at other people, sometimes loses his sense of humour when his own mistakes or lack of knowledge are exposed.
When the time comes, and no miracle happens, there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.
But no laughing at those people and nations that voted remain et yet got entrained into this unreasonable outcome.

But who knows, miracles sometimes happen...

Krystal n chips 21st Aug 2019 04:01

As I understand matters, every resident of No 10 gets their image hung somewhere to remind future tenants they are not alone in being, in many cases and certainly in recent times, as depicted here......

https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...andoff-cartoon

wiggy 21st Aug 2019 06:02


Originally Posted by NoelEvans (Post 10550040)
How are those 27 getting on? Italy seems to make the UK look very well-managed.

Err...I hate to break it to you ..:ooh:

NoelEvans 21st Aug 2019 06:36


Originally Posted by Una Due Tfc (Post 10550159)
...

Oh and both Norway and Sweden are part of Schengen...

Yet another person who does not read before posting.

Neither Britain nor Ireland are in Schengen and never have been. They are in the Common Travel Area which predates Schengen by over seven decades.

If you are a Romanian Gypsy and you have an EU passport you will be able to enter the UK directly as visitor, the same way that many other nationalities can do. You would not be permitted to stay though. No need to go all the way around through Ireland just to do that.

If you were a Latvian drug dealer that Britain did not want in the country, then Ireland would most likely have that information too. Way back to 1923 part of the agreement was that the two countries would work together on matters like that and that Ireland would know who is personae non gratae in the UK.

I think that you are trying to imagine 'problems' that just aren't there.

Unlike the divisions in Belgium which seems to make the Brits look delightfully harmonious.

The Nip 21st Aug 2019 06:42

From today's Times.

SaveBritish technology start-ups are enjoying an unprecedented investment boom, shrugging off concerns over a no-deal Brexit.

High-tech companies have received a record $6.7 billion (£5.5 billion) in new funding this year, 50 per cent more than the same period last year. They are on course to secure more than $11 billion by the end of the year, easily eclipsing last year’s total of $8.7 billion, according to official figures. The data, from the government’s digital economy council, suggests that Britain remains the most attractive country in Europe for overseas tech investors.

US and Asian funds accounted for more than half of the investment so far this year, thanks to bumper financing rounds at Deliveroo, the food delivery app, and Ovo Energy, an electricity and gas provider. In the past five years US and Asian investors have pumped $14.6 billion into UK tech start-ups, compared with $6.5 billion and $2.5 billion for their German and French counterparts. The influx shows that jitters around investment in the run-up to Brexit have not affected the country’s vibrant start-up scene.

Tech businesses are regarded as being less exposed to a no-deal Brexit than companies in other industries, which rely on complex supply chains of physical goods that could be disrupted by tariffs and border checks. Mooted changes to immigration policy, which would place a minimum threshold on salaries for skilled overseas workers, would also have less of an impact on the industry, where pay levels are comparatively high.

“These fantastic figures show the confidence overseas investors have in UK tech,” Nicky Morgan, secretary of state for digital, culture, media and sport, said. “We have a longstanding reputation for innovation and the statistics endorse our reputation as one of the best places in the world to start and grow a digital business.”

The government’s Operation Yellowhammer dossier into the effects of a no-deal Brexit included a chilling warning for the sector. No-deal could “disrupt the flow of personal data from the EU, where an alternative legal base for transfer is not in place,” it said.

Britain’s digital economy relies on the transfer of information between data centres here and the EU. According to the document, it “could take years” to restore data-sharing arrangements.

However, these concerns have not dampened investors’ enthusiasm for the raft of “unicorns” — private companies worth more than $1 billion — to have emerged in Britain over recent years. Checkout.com, a London-based digital payments company, raised $230 million in early May, while Greensill, a finance firm that counts David Cameron as an adviser, secured $800 million from the Japanese tech giant Softbank a week later.

Over the past two decades UK-based entrepreneurs have built 72 unicorn companies, according to separate government research. That compares with 29 in Germany, and 26 in India. The US and China created 703 and 206 respectively.

Krystal n chips 21st Aug 2019 07:16

Re # 1331....bit long to quote really....however.

Whilst the report will surely stir the red white and blue corpuscles in many, it begs a few questions.

How many people does the sector employ for example in comparison to say, in general terms, the service / distribution / agricultural sectors.

Investment is fine, indeed it's essential, but how much of a return will go to the UK tax collection and how much to the priority, in their eyes and minds, shareholders and investors......no prizes for the answer being disproportionately skewed in favour of the latter.

Also, the article allows a member of junta to shrill forth............ as Nicky is prone to do......here's some of her previous shrilling ....

https://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2014/1...n-tragicomedy/

ATNotts 21st Aug 2019 07:21

The Nip:-

The excellent, very positive news contained in the first two paragraphs are somewhat tainted by the potential negatives contained in the rest of the story. Additionally, it is really encouraging that so many more unicorn companies have developed in UK than in Germany and India. However I fear the backstory may be that many of the UK businesses will get flogged off to large US, or other tech giants, whereas perhaps in the other named countries they may remain in private hands for longer.

The history of UK entrepreneurs bagging the cash by flogging their businesses and ideas is not encouraging.

ATNotts 21st Aug 2019 07:27


Unlike the divisions in Belgium which seems to make the Brits look delightfully harmonious.
Belgium is very much like Ireland, minus the hotheaded terrorists. Two ethnic groups, divided along linguistic and religious grounds. Separate TV and radio offerings, and voting in elections, so far as I can see from over here, divided roughly down ethnic lines. Wallonie feels very different to the rest of Belgium to me as a tourist, in Wallonie you speak French or struggle, elsewhere Flemish and English no problem. Wollonie appears to a large extent poor and run down, the north prosperous.

I really do fear that the split between remainers and leavers in the UK is now quite evident, and with a more divisive PM in Boris Johnson, that isn't going to get any better, especially if we get, as appears more and more likely a no deal Brexit.

racedo 21st Aug 2019 07:48


Originally Posted by KelvinD (Post 10550153)
I heard an Irish politician on Radio 4 this morning telling us how a border control relying on technology, pre-clearing etc can't work and doesn't exist anywhere in the world. I watched an interesting feature on the BBC not too long ago, showing how just such a border exists and operates quite well between Norway & Sweden. I think the only way to stop politicians lying to us it to rip their tongues out!

https://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/n...-36850570.html

Official estimates that there are 208 border crossing points along the border. These do not take account of where it runs through fields, houses, farmyards etc when merely walking from one room to another means you have crossed a border.

Doubt it takes account of the roads where in the space of a couple of miles you move into and out of each.

Technology has zero chance because soon as it is put up it will be destroyed unless you want to propose the army guards it. Bearing in mind from 1969 to 1998 there were thousands of soldiers and police along the border and it was porous do you think it will change ?

racedo 21st Aug 2019 07:50


Originally Posted by ATNotts (Post 10550404)
The Nip:-

The excellent, very positive news contained in the first two paragraphs are somewhat tainted by the potential negatives contained in the rest of the story. Additionally, it is really encouraging that so many more unicorn companies have developed in UK than in Germany and India. However I fear the backstory may be that many of the UK businesses will get flogged off to large US, or other tech giants, whereas perhaps in the other named countries they may remain in private hands for longer.

The history of UK entrepreneurs bagging the cash by flogging their businesses and ideas is not encouraging.

or supporting Brexit and legging it to Singapore a la Lord Dyson

Fitter2 21st Aug 2019 07:58

Fly Aiprt


Originally Posted by Una Due Tfc https://www.pprune.org/images/buttons/viewpost.gif
You do know that border closes at night right? And there’s a fraction as many crossing points as there are between ROI and NI? There’s 11 crossing points between Norway and Sweden, there’s literally hundreds between NI and ROI.
Oh and both Norway and Sweden are part of Schengen...
Our friend surely knows that and must have a practical proposition for implementing an agreements a la Schengen between the territories in question.
We'll be much interested in reading the detailed explanations.


​​​​​​​But there already is a Schengen like agreement between ROI and UK (plus Isle of Man and Channel Islands) - it's called the Common Travel Area, and predates Schengen by over half a Century

Fly Aiprt 21st Aug 2019 08:06


Originally Posted by Krystal n chips (Post 10550398)
Whilst the report will surely stir the red white and blue corpuscles in many, it begs a few questions.

Something is striking in the tone of the article : they don't seem to say investment is soaring because of the Brexit, but gives the impression that this happens despite of the Brexit. Why not boast about Brexit attracting investors ?
Or is it a subtly anti Brexit press report ?



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