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Ninthace 17th Jul 2021 16:05

And while you are at it, can you explain why NZ lamb is cheaper that the sheep I pass in the fields on the way to the butchers?

In France, I used to be able to lean over the gate and point out the one I wanted but it seems you can't do that in the UK, even post Brexit.

LowNSlow 18th Jul 2021 09:56

Ninthace; have look here. It is a bit old.....


Due to these economies of scale, New Zealand lamb has generally been cheaper than the UK product although the price difference isn’t so great nowadays.

Much of the best UK lamb has usually been exported to France, pushing up the local price for what is left in the UK. It will be interesting to see what happens after Brexit.

A very relevant point is that in New Zealand, Winter (when most lambs are born) starts in June so “spring lamb” can be exported to the Northern Hemisphere at a time when it’s out of season in the UK and Europe.

Ninthace 18th Jul 2021 10:19


Originally Posted by LowNSlow (Post 11080654)
Ninthace; have look here. It is a bit old.....

Grateful for that. Intuitively you would think the cost of shipping something perishable half way round the world would make stuff more expensive than the local product but clearly it is more complicated.

SWBKCB 18th Jul 2021 10:58


Originally Posted by Ninthace (Post 11080667)
Grateful for that. Intuitively you would think the cost of shipping something perishable half way round the world would make stuff more expensive than the local product but clearly it is more complicated.

All subsidies removed from NZ farming?

B Fraser 18th Jul 2021 11:14


Originally Posted by Ninthace (Post 11080308)
In France, I used to be able to lean over the gate and point out the one I wanted but it seems you can't do that in the UK, even post Brexit.

Oh yes you can. I have picked two that will be in the freezer in a couple of months. One is named Gordon Lambsey and the other, Kebaaaaab !

grottyyottie 18th Jul 2021 20:35


Originally Posted by B Fraser (Post 11080688)
Oh yes you can. I have picked two that will be in the freezer in a couple of months. One is named Gordon Lambsey and the other, Kebaaaaab !

I believe that the french rather liked live imports from the UK. Trouble ahead.

Alsacienne 19th Jul 2021 06:03

Hardly ever buy lamb because it's VERY expensive. Foie gras, lobster and beef are cheaper!

wiggy 19th Jul 2021 06:34


Originally Posted by Alsacienne (Post 11081051)
Hardly ever buy lamb because it's VERY expensive. Foie gras, lobster and beef are cheaper!

Yep, you don’t see much lamb in any of the local supermarkets around here …beef/pork/goat/horse/seafood/fowl etc etc yep but rarely lamb, and when you do you need a mortgage to buy it.

Maybe it’s more commonly seen “up north” and on the plates in the posh restaurants.

I certainly can’t see “trouble ahead” in the form of the French population taking to the streets en-mass protest because they want their lamb back….

Ninthace 19th Jul 2021 09:18


Originally Posted by wiggy (Post 11081055)
Yep, you don’t see much lamb in any of the local supermarkets around here …beef/pork/goat/horse/seafood/fowl etc etc yep but rarely lamb, and when you do you need a mortgage to buy it.

Maybe it’s more commonly seen “up north” and on the plates in the posh restaurants.

I certainly can’t see “trouble ahead” in the form of the French population taking to the streets en-mass protest because they want their lamb back….

In the Pyrenees we had a fair amount of lamb but the nicest was eaten around Easter, slaughtered before they were weaned, one leg was a complete serving for one person, delicious creamy flesh and beautifully tender.

wiggy 19th Jul 2021 19:56


Originally Posted by Ninthace (Post 11081188)
In the Pyrenees we had a fair amount of lamb but the nicest was eaten around Easter, slaughtered before they were weaned, one leg was a complete serving for one person, delicious creamy flesh and beautifully tender.

Look out our back window and you can see the Pyrenees… :) (well a bit of the eastern end of the range). Despite that unfortunately you certainly don’t see much lamb in the local supermarkets these days, and if there is any as often as not it’s from…….NZ…..

Ninthace 19th Jul 2021 20:37


Originally Posted by wiggy (Post 11081502)
Look out our back window and you can see the Pyrenees… :) (well a bit of the eastern end of the range). Despite that unfortunately you certainly don’t see much lamb in the local supermarkets these days, and if there is any as often as not it’s from…….NZ…..

That is a shame, we used to cook ours on the BBQ on a big bed of Rosemary branches. The lamb either came from a local farm, hand picked and slaughtered on the premises, or from the Super U near Montréjeau. The Easter lamb was a speciality of the Hostellerie des 7 Molles. The other thing we enjoyed was duck that we often bought from the freezer in the garden centre (Point Vert) next to Super U. The duck breasts were much bigger and more succulent than the UK offerings and not too badly priced. I think they were a spin off of the Foie Gras industry as were the big bags of duck hearts which, fried with a persillade and walnuts, made the basis for a great salad, We were in Haute Garonne

wiggy 19th Jul 2021 21:05

Yum yum…..

“The Easter lamb was a speciality of the Hostellerie des 7 Molles”

Looks like they aren’t a million km from us, must check them out..many thanks…:ok:

Alsacienne 19th Jul 2021 21:41

You two are making me jealous ... and hungry! :p

ORAC 21st Jul 2021 05:20

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/b...s-eu-kp3crfhfp

Brexit: Spanish police will man border in Gibraltar, insists EU

Spanish police border guards could be sent to Gibraltar for the first time in more than 300 years under post-Brexit demands from the European Union.

Brussels has ignored a provisional agreement hammered out between the British and Spanish governments last year over the future of Gibraltar.

The framework deal was designed to allow the territory in effect to enter into the EU’s Schengen free-movement area, which is seen as critical for its economy. The EU would take responsibility for policing border crossing points into Gibraltar — and avoid the politically controversial prospect of allowing Spanish border guards to decide who can and cannot enter the territory.

In a draft negotiating mandate published yesterday, Brussels, which must approve the framework agreement for it to take effect, removed key elements of the proposals signed off by London and Madrid.

The mandate says only Spain will be able to issue short and long-term visas to Gibraltar and any visitors would need to pass Schengen checks as a condition of entry. It calls for the extensive application of EU law in Gibraltar, both in terms of customs checks and single-market standards.

Most provocatively, it calls for Spanish border guards to take responsibility for all checks on people arriving at Gibraltar port and airport.

“The envisaged agreement should provide that Spanish border guards have all necessary powers and obligations to carry out the border controls and surveillance, including with respect to refusal of entry, receipt of requests for international protection, arrest of a person and seizure of property in line with the applicable union legislation,” it states.

It adds: “In case follow-up actions need to be taken, the agreement should provide for an obligation on the UK authorities in respect of Gibraltar to assist and facilitate the transfer of the person or object concerned to the authorities of Spain.”

Some suspect that the move by the European Commission is deliberately designed to put pressure on the British government before talks to try to resolve disputes over the Northern Ireland protocol….

Gibraltar’s economy is largely dependent on mainland Spain, and the UK needs a deal to ensure the territory’s long-term prosperity. A government source accused the commission of opening up “another sore” before the talks on Northern Ireland.

A Gibraltar government source said that allowing Spanish police to operate in the territory “simply wasn’t going to happen”.

ORAC 21st Jul 2021 06:23

Politico London Playbook

DRIVING THE DAY

FROST BITE

Cabinet ministers are thrust to the top of the news agenda today as non-COVID news dominates for the first time in a while.

Brexit is back with Northern Ireland Secretary Brandon Lewis making a highly anticipated statement to parliament this lunchtime on the NI protocol, in which the government is expected to propose tearing up the trading arrangements it agreed with the EU in 2019 and threaten to override the protocol if Brussels does not agree. Brexit Minister David Frost will also publish a “command paper” making the U.K. argument…..

Strong G7 vibes

Straight after PMQs, it’s over to Brexit, when Brandon Lewis is up in the Commons at 12.30 p.m. for his all-important statement on the Northern Ireland protocol. David Frost, the minister negotiating with the EU on the problems with checks at the border between Great Britain and Northern Ireland, will simultaneously release a paper explaining the U.K.’s proposals to resolve the issue.

The FT’s Peter Foster, George Parker and Mehreen Khan have the best steer on what we can expect — they say Frost and Lewis’ demands will “radically overhaul” the trading arrangements signed off in the Withdrawal Agreement, and are likely to “infuriate” Brussels.

The details

Scarce at the moment, but the FT’s sources tell the paper that Johnson told Irish Taoiseach Micheál Martin in a phone call yesterday that all goods made in Great Britain should be able to go into Northern Ireland without checks.

This obviously presents a major challenge in terms of sticking to the Brexit deal Johnson signed, which agreed that all good shipped from GB to NI must meet EU customs and agrifoods rules.

The FT says Frost will propose an “honesty box” approach, by which GB companies declare their goods are only for use in NI, and a standards regime that would allow both EU and U.K. goods to coexist in NI, with labels explaining they’re only to be used there.

The stick

The major question is over how far Frost and Lewis go in terms of both rhetoric and substance.

In an essential analysis thread*, Sky’s Sam Coates lays out the three options available to the ministers, in ascending order of controversy: They could threaten to activate Article 16, the clause in the Withdrawal Agreement that allows one side to override it … They could go one better and activate Article 16 right away … Or they could just unilaterally tear up the Northern Ireland protocol entirely.

Which one will they do?

The FT reports: “In a warning that Britain could suspend the Northern Ireland protocol in its Brexit deal with the EU if the bloc does not give way, Frost will claim the U.K. is already within its rights to activate the Article 16 override clause in the agreement.” As Sam Coates notes, that is very much closer to the first, least dramatic of the three options he outlined.

Of course, all this depends on exactly what Frost and Lewis say, and whether they demand the protocol be rewritten — something which the EU has consistently made clear it will not countenance.

Is there a way through?

Last night brought a significant intervention from U.S. State Department Spokesperson Ned Price, who said the Biden administration would be “watching” today’s move by the U.K and urged Britain to stay within the “existing mechanisms” of the NI protocol.

All eyes in the White House on Brandon Lewis at 7.30 a.m. D.C. time….

*

SWBKCB 21st Jul 2021 06:30


Originally Posted by Ninthace (Post 11081188)
In the Pyrenees we had a fair amount of lamb but the nicest was eaten around Easter, slaughtered before they were weaned, one leg was a complete serving for one person, delicious creamy flesh and beautifully tender.

The Welsh used to send a lot of "Light Lambs" to France and Italy for this Easter market

Sallyann1234 21st Jul 2021 06:58

So the inevitable happens. Boris and Co signed up to a deal that everyone knew was impossible for them to sustain.

The EU has allowed us to delay and prevaricate for many months, but the consequences start now. This will be very messy.

ATNotts 21st Jul 2021 07:49


Originally Posted by Sallyann1234 (Post 11082358)
So the inevitable happens. Boris and Co signed up to a deal that everyone knew was impossible for them to sustain.

The EU has allowed us to delay and prevaricate for many months, but the consequences start now. This will be very messy.

This is probably the true reason why "Operation Brock" has been reinstated on the M20, less to do with holiday traffic and more to do with contingency were the EU to have a kneejerk reaction in response to the UK unilaterally breaking the NI protocol.

ORAC 21st Jul 2021 08:10

You’ll pardon me if I disagree.

Over both NI and Gibraltar the negotiators on both sides agreed deals which could have worked, assuming common sense and good will on both sides.

The NI protocol was designed to allow trade to continue over both the Irish border and Irish Sea with the minimum of checks. The checks were designed to ensure the rules weren’t being abused by wholesale smuggling into or out of the EU. As far as I am aware the number of cases brought concerning smuggling to date is zero.

Instead the EU Commission is using the protocol as a blunt club to coerce the UK into agreeing to legally follow all EU phytosanitary regulations, current and future.

The checks the EU are no performing on goods entering NI are currently more than 20% of the total checks on all goods entering the EU, Europort at Rotterdam only has 12% of the total. Meanwhile the percentage of the goods crossing the Irish Sea are under 0.005% of total EU imports. And these from a country still obeying all the same regulations as the rest of the EU.

Similarly the UK and Spain agreed a draft protocol for the border at Gibraltar which was acceptable to both and satisfied the political and historical issues between them. The EU has now also thrown that back in their faces.

I am afraid it is quite obvious that the EU Commission has never accepted the insult they perceive Brexit offered to their plans and are intent on being as obstructive as possible in order to make things as difficult as possible for the UK.

Sallyann1234 21st Jul 2021 08:41

ORAC you can obscure the issue with as many words as you like. They don’t hide the very simple fact that Brexit puts Northern Ireland in an impossible position.
It was the UK that created this position, not the EU.


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