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alicopter 5th Jul 2021 13:41


Originally Posted by charliegolf (Post 11073583)
So, exactly when do the worry-worts think that an appropriately licensed HGV driver might be sent out on the road alone*?

*In the very manner that virtually every HGV Class 1 is operated in UK.

CG

What my concern is is the additional operating cost, in percentage, between an experimented HGV driver and a new one considering the 70000 vacancies to be filled! I have paid over £1100 per year for my kids car insurance when they started to drive, does any body know what the average policy for brand new HGV driver is and what it means for hauliers budgets? I always dreamt of my two to get a PPL(H), I even trained them to drive their car with the lef hand on the hand brake and pull on it when in front of an obstacle to get over it... (JOKE!!!) but I know it does not make economical sense, for my wallet anyway.

B Fraser 5th Jul 2021 13:53

One of the largest transport organisations in the UK has no insurance. They have sufficient turnover and cash reserves to self-insure.

ATNotts 5th Jul 2021 13:55


Originally Posted by B Fraser (Post 11073607)
One of the largest transport organisations in the UK has no insurance. They have sufficient turnover and cash reserves to self-insure.

To drive a vehicle without insurance is surely illegal?

Do you perhaps mean public liability insurance?

ORAC 5th Jul 2021 15:57


To drive a vehicle without insurance is surely illegal?
You could self-insure by depositing a £500K bond with government up until Nov 2019 when the law was changed.

https://www.fleetnews.co.uk/fleet-ma...ncing-the-risk

There was a consultation to remove the option, where the DoT agreed that the existing act should be changed. The last link seems to show that new bonds ceased to be available from Nov 2019 and existing ones lapse on Nov 2021.

https://assets.publishing.service.go...d-deposits.pdf

https://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/...ade?view=plain

B Fraser 5th Jul 2021 19:25

Thanks for the clarification ORAC. I reviewed that business back in 2016 and was not aware that the legislation had changed.

Imagegear 6th Jul 2021 16:17

...and let's not get onto Loco Missile Captains...

Commander Taco 9th Jul 2021 00:02

From "The Economist" - June 26th 2021:

"In early June Britain's long-suffering Europhiles got a rare taste of Schadenfreude. Tim Martin, a forthright Brexiteer who is the boss of J.D. Wetherspoon, a chain of pubs, announced that Britain ought to create a more liberal immigration policy to allow more Europeans to move there to work. Over the past 18 months, hundreds of thousands of European immigrants, most of whom worked in pubs and restaurants and lost their jobs when everything closed during the covid-19 lockdowns, have gone home. Brexit means that many cannot return. He denies it, but Mr. Martin's establishments are most certainly suffering from the staff shortages afflicting the rest of the British hospitality industry".

Executives like Mr. Martin, who ardently supported Brexit, deserve to be slapped up the side of the head. The damage he and his kind have done to Britain is already evident. By virtue of their position and supposed business savvy, they should have known better. So, I would ask him: If not immigration, then what in the Brexit manifesto did he strongly support?

Krystal n chips 9th Jul 2021 05:45

Option 1 The EU's accounting principles are flawed and this is yet another example of the EU being vindictive, ...Unlikely

Option 2. The UK Gov't were aware of the extra costs and chose to ignore or not publicise less "getting Brexit done ! " suddenly became far less attractive along with deciding we would be doing our own interpretation of the "deal" and agreement along with Boris blustering his excuses as to why....Very Likely.

Brexit Ďdivorce billí higher than UKís forecasts, Brussels estimates | Brexit | The Guardian

goofer3 9th Jul 2021 06:40


Originally Posted by Commander Taco (Post 11075629)
From "The Economist" - June 26th 2021:

"In early June Britain's long-suffering Europhiles got a rare taste of Schadenfreude. Tim Martin, a forthright Brexiteer who is the boss of J.D. Wetherspoon, a chain of pubs, announced that Britain ought to create a more liberal immigration policy to allow more Europeans to move there to work. Over the past 18 months, hundreds of thousands of European immigrants, most of whom worked in pubs and restaurants and lost their jobs when everything closed during the covid-19 lockdowns, have gone home. Brexit means that many cannot return. He denies it, but Mr. Martin's establishments are most certainly suffering from the staff shortages afflicting the rest of the British hospitality industry".

https://www.thenational.scot/news/19...orkers-brexit/

SWBKCB 9th Jul 2021 07:11


Originally Posted by Krystal n chips (Post 11075699)
Option 1 The EU's accounting principles are flawed and this is yet another example of the EU being vindictive, ...Unlikely

Option 2. The UK Gov't were aware of the extra costs and chose to ignore or not publicise less "getting Brexit done ! " suddenly became far less attractive along with deciding we would be doing our own interpretation of the "deal" and agreement along with Boris blustering his excuses as to why....Very Likely.

Brexit Ďdivorce billí higher than UKís forecasts, Brussels estimates | Brexit | The Guardian

Option 3 - the Guardian gets its facts wrong?

Effluent Man 9th Jul 2021 07:46

Oxymoron - Facts are by definition correct.

TURIN 9th Jul 2021 08:46


Originally Posted by SWBKCB (Post 11075734)
Option 3 - the Guardian gets its facts wrong?

Spelling. The facts speak for them selves. 😁

Effluent Man 9th Jul 2021 09:18

What like leaving a gap between them and selves?

NutLoose 9th Jul 2021 09:26

Quote:
Originally Posted by Commander Taco View Post
From "The Economist" - June 26th 2021:

"In early June Britain's long-suffering Europhiles got a rare taste of Schadenfreude. Tim Martin, a forthright Brexiteer who is the boss of J.D. Wetherspoon, a chain of pubs, announced that Britain ought to create a more liberal immigration policy to allow more Europeans to move there to work. Over the past 18 months, hundreds of thousands of European immigrants, most of whom worked in pubs and restaurants and lost their jobs when everything closed during the covid-19 lockdowns, have gone home. Brexit means that many cannot return. He denies it, but Mr. Martin's establishments are most certainly suffering from the staff shortages afflicting the rest of the British hospitality industry".
https://www.thenational.scot/news/19...orkers-brexit/


But then again if he had put his hands in his own pockets to retain his foreign staff here, they would have been able to stay, it sounds awfully like not my probem, right up until it is, then blame the government for their policies that he knew would have a detrimental effect on his staffing levels. No sympathy.

ORAC 9th Jul 2021 09:44

Reference the EU bill.

They are both estimates worked out on bills due over the next 3-4 decades including pension liabilities etc. Governments canít even forecast 12 months ahead correctly. Over such time spans £4-5B isnít quite a rounding error - but itís well within the confidence factor either side of the eventual bill.

But it makes a good story to fill a few column inches.

Cornish Jack 9th Jul 2021 09:50

But it makes a good story to fill a few column inches.
... and who could be better qualified to judge such qualities ?

Torquetalk 9th Jul 2021 10:04


Originally Posted by goofer3 (Post 11075720)

oh well, if he says it isn’t so, I guess I believe him 🤣

SWBKCB 10th Jul 2021 06:55


Originally Posted by ORAC (Post 11075828)
Reference the EU bill.

They are both estimates worked out on bills due over the next 3-4 decades including pension liabilities etc. Governments canít even forecast 12 months ahead correctly. Over such time spans £4-5B isnít quite a rounding error - but itís well within the confidence factor either side of the eventual bill.

But it makes a good story to fill a few column inches.

This blog gives an explanation, and makes sense from my limited understanding of Commission accounting. Commission communications on these matters tend to be very precise, but only address the technical matter in hand - don't look for them to address the wider context (so in this case only the debt is addressed, with no mention of other factors that might change/reduce it)

Brexit: another myth is born

Cornish Jack 10th Jul 2021 12:03

Heard on a passing news programme yesterday, that 'our man Frost' has said that the shambles as a result of the Brexit fiasco are down to the Buffoon's predecessor , the blessed Treeza. Should we feel reassured that our present Government were so lax in due diligence, that they just signed up to someone else's negotiations ? Or, is this the expected attempt to shuffle off any blame for the catastrophe which they, (and they alone), created ?

Denti 10th Jul 2021 13:40


Originally Posted by SWBKCB (Post 11076278)
t (so in this case only the debt is addressed, with no mention of other factors that might change/reduce it)

Not entirely, the EU did account for 1.8 billion the UK is due from fines collected on companies running afoul of EU rules over the time the UK was a member of the EU. But yes, liability does not directly translate into payments, for example going around and killing the UKs ex MEPs would considerably reduce the UKs payment into the EU pension system.


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