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galaxy flyer 1st Feb 2018 03:30

If this document, which remains secret, is so transparently false; it will be exposed. If, as rumored, shows the 2016 Democrat campaign illegally used the FISA court and the FBI to commit espionage on the Republican campaign; hide its tracks; implicate other; then that will shown. It’s not just a “letter dreamed up” in the dark; it apparently has enough facts to embarrass the FBI.

GF

vapilot2004 1st Feb 2018 03:55


FBI Director Christopher Wray told the White House he opposes release of a classified Republican memo alleging bias at the FBI and Justice Department because it contains inaccurate information and paints a false narrative, according to a person familiar with the matter.

That you have predetermined the memo’s validity without having seen it shows to who among us is politicizing it.
As I said before, if you want good water, don't wait by the bog pipe with your drinking cup. It's pretty simple, really, WACA, one should always consider the source.

Nunes has been politicizing and sabotaging a serious investigation since its inception, running interference for Trump, so why would we trust what comes out of his mealy mouth now?


You'd have to ask the fine folks at "This is CNN" that one.
Sorry for the confusion, MR. I was referring to the trainload of Republican Congressmen that hit the trash truck.

galaxy flyer 1st Feb 2018 04:15

Stars and Bars fly over Sacramento?

Streetwise Professor » Hoist the Stars and Bars Over Sacramento!

You Californians trying to start another Civil War via nullification?

GF

vapilot2004 1st Feb 2018 08:47

I'll just take one example of how that article is so wrong, GF. Pollution standards in the automotive and fossil fuel industry.

California was way ahead of its time calling for reformulated gasoline and tough emissions standards for automobiles. As anyone can tell you that lived in the LA basin, the air there is no longer the, brown, choking, visible stuff it once was. The reason? The aforementioned rules and restrictions.

Care to see what the world would be like if Trump and his greedy Trumpettes (Zinke, Sessions, Big Oil, the Dirty Kings of Coal, Koch's, etc) and the GOP ran industry and government their way: have a walkabout in Shanghai, one of many Asian boom towns where regulation is in short supply while pollutants spew a'plenty. Be sure to breathe it in deep.

Californians long ago decided the air we breathe and water we drink and land we live on are all precious resources, not to be sullied by the dirt and grease of unfettered greed's relentless and reckless pursuit of money for the sake of money alone.

Um... lifting... 1st Feb 2018 13:11


Californians long ago decided the air we breathe and water we drink and land we live on are all precious resources, not to be sullied by the dirt and grease of unfettered greed's relentless and reckless pursuit of money for the sake of money alone.
Well, of course they did, once they figured out those resources weren't infinite (though Californians demand for them was and is). There's plenty wrong with those assertions.

If Angelenos and their ilk really believed what you're saying they wouldn't have permitted the plowing up of the L.A. and P.E. Railways in the '40s. But they did. Old money L.A., before talking films, was oil. Old money L.A. still is oil.

Anyway, the powers that be in L.A., having made a hash of public transport, then took and continue to take obscene amounts of cash for the 'freeway' system. L.A. also became the center of 'car culture'. Somewhere in there they decided there might be a bit of a 'smog' problem. But, if your place is in Santa Barbara or Malibu with an ocean breeze, that smog seems so far away.

As for water, yeah, that's probably it. Precious resource. That's why Cali's been sucking off the Colorado River for a century. Have a look at Lake Mead. Los Angeles grew on other people's water, and the construction of the L.A. Aqueduct and accompanying regulation compelled surrounding communities to be annexed by L.A. if they hoped to have anything to drink once the city sucked the aquifer dry. That coupled with the wasteful farming practices in the valleys with no incentive to conserve water have brought California to where it is today. L.A. has in the last decade or so (by court order) magnanimously returned the Owens River to 5% of its pre-aqueduct flow. From 0%.

There's plenty of greed to go around, make no mistake there.

Trump's pretty bad, but if you think that Californians are without sin... think again.

West Coast 1st Feb 2018 14:40

VAPA

I sometimes wonder if we live in the same state. If California was so worried about natural resources, ie water, the infrastructure would match that concern. One only need look at the trillions of gallons of water wasted at the Oroville dam as the deferred maintenance practices caught up to that whack nut Brown. Can't spend it all on illegal aliens and excessive social programs.

galaxy flyer 1st Feb 2018 15:20

So, vapilot, California isn’t flaunting Federal law on “sanctuary” cities, for one example? Ok, agreed LA, due to unique terrain, had a smog issue, been there, done that; but that issue doesn’t give you all nullification rights. Besides, the LA pollution problem was unique to the “Valley of Smokes”; why does that give Cali the authority to enforce its rules on others?

GF

Concours77 1st Feb 2018 15:24

Political
 

Originally Posted by lomapaseo (Post 10038028)
According to CNN they claim that it leaves out critical facts.

I surmised that what is left out is the classified stuff the FBI said was "extraordinary reckless"

Trump can get by this by saying that he decided not to release it (is it really his call?) because it has very sensitive info in it.

That ought to calm everybody down except the fake news stories and it can become a forever classic bedtime story for generations

It is not his call. He is asked to review it to eliminate the possibility of security breaches. It is a courtesy, (required by law), that Congress affords a separate branch of government. He sends it back to Congress, with “no objection”, “objection”, or “no comment”.

Had the FBI not engaged in blatant inappropriate politicking in the first place, it would not need to violate its own policy of not commenting on a proposed action by its counterpart in the Congress, “the Committee”.

Having first said “I see no factual errors”, the FBI now says the memo is not the same one as Congress created originally. Hair splitting.

I would be tempted to withhold the memo, and let Mueller spend the remaining time he has (not long) puckered and paranoid about its contents.

Just my opinion. Another opinion? The hysteria of the Bureau telegraphs how damning it’s contents are.

Checkmate, IMO.

Lonewolf_50 1st Feb 2018 17:20

As regards to water, is California really that far from Cape Town in their careless abuse of water?

West Coast 1st Feb 2018 17:27

As to the reduction in pollution in socal, you can thank Republicans for that. CARB was started by a Republican and it's leadership was appointed by Republican governors. The AQMD in socal is governed at a local level, not from Sacramento.

Turbine D 1st Feb 2018 18:14

Who Is The Real Enemy?
 
Vladimir Putin has to be laughing out loud as Trump and the Republicans attempt to undermine the FBI. “What could be a better outcome for our plan to weaken the United States”, he asks? A champagne and vodka toast to our successes in 2017 and onward in 2018! As for 2018, this shouldn't be hard for Putin to do with continued help from Trump & friends:


Moscow steadily rebuilds ties in Caribbean and Latin America; ‘an attempt to challenge U.S. leadership’
MIAMI—Russia is solidifying its footing close to U.S. shores, in the Caribbean, a region Moscow abandoned after the Cold War and has gradually returned to with investment, diplomacy and military hardware.

In recent months Russia has developed a multidimensional relationship with the tiny nation of Grenada, whose name has resonated with many Americans since President Ronald Reagan invaded in 1983 rather than see another leftist-revolutionary government follow Cuba and mature in the Caribbean.

Russia’s presence in the Caribbean is now “stronger than at any time since the end of the Cold War,” said the Caribbean Council, a London consulting firm.

The stakes in a regional U.S.-Russia rivalry are small compared with the Cold War era, with its Cuban Missile Crisis and fears of nuclear war.

But that hasn’t halted a competition for influence in the Caribbean and Latin America. Gen. John Kelly, who is now White House chief of staff and was then in charge of the U.S. military’s Southern Command, said in 2015 that President Vladimir Putin’s Russia was challenging the U.S. in the region.

Gen. Kelly’s successor, Adm. Kurt W. Tidd, echoed that view last year: Russia, he said, “uses soft power tools in an attempt to challenge U.S. leadership in the Western Hemisphere.”

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson leaves Thursday for Mexico, Argentina, Peru, Colombia and Jamaica, an opportunity for Washington to nurture regional relationships.

Russia has been pursuing its own avenues. Grenada opened an embassy in Moscow last summer, installing a Soviet-born dual U.S.-Grenadian citizen, Oleg Firer, as ambassador. In September, Grenada—population 111,000—and Russia (140 million) granted each other’s citizens visa-free travel.

For Grenada, it is all about investment, trade and tourism.

“Russia is a gateway to Eurasia for us,” said Mr. Firer, who was born in Ukraine and has championed the expanded relationship with Moscow. “We see it as a huge market.”

The two governments are working on deals in agriculture, energy, real estate, and technology. Global Petroleum Group, a subsidiary of the Moscow-based conglomerate Sistema, discovered natural gas in Grenadian waters in the fall.

“We’re not going to start purchasing arms,” said Nickolas Steele, Grenada’s minister of health, social security, and international business. “We went that way, during the last Cold War, in aligning ourselves with one doctrine in particular, one nation in particular, and finding turmoil at our own expense. At this point, our relationships are based purely on economic benefit.”

Arms sales wouldn’t be unusual for Russia. In the fall, Moscow said it was preparing to sign a military cooperation agreement with Suriname, on the northeastern Atlantic coast of South America. Russian officials didn’t respond to requests for comment about the agreement.

Niermala Badrising, Suriname’s ambassador to the U.S., said Suriname is also pursuing engagement with Russia in trade, technology and tourism. “As a small country, in terms of geopolitical and geostrategic cooperation, I think it makes sense to forge stronger relations in many areas with different countries,” he said.

In January, U.S. Navy officials said they spotted a Russian spy ship in the Caribbean, heading toward the Florida coast. Last year, the U.S. spotted the same ship, the Viktor Leonov, off Connecticut and Georgia.

Some experts regard Russian maneuvers as a calculated challenge to American leadership in the region, a response to what Russian officials see as an encroachment in Eastern Europe by the U.S. and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

“Russia was looking for a way to send a strategic message to the U.S.…‘If you muck around with us, we can muck around in your backyard also,’ ’’ said Evan Ellis, an associate professor of Latin American studies at the U.S. Army War College Strategic Studies Institute.

The U.S. Southern Command, which administers a naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, oversees approximately 7,000 soldiers in the Caribbean and in Central and South America.

During the Cold War, the Soviet Union provided aid to Cuba, propping up a communist ally in the Western Hemisphere as a counterweight to NATO’s European operations.

Russian interest in Latin America dwindled in the 1990s, but revived following the Russo-Georgian War in 2008, when Daniel Ortega, an erstwhile Soviet ally who had regained the Nicaraguan presidency, recognized the Georgian breakaway republics of Abkhazia and South Ossetia as sovereign states.

For the next six years Russia’s arms-export agency, Rosoboronexport, was cutting weapons deals with a handful of Latin American countries.

Russia sold Latin America $14.5 billion in arms between 2001 and 2013, roughly 40% of arms imports to the region, according to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. Most of those deals were with Venezuela.

At the outset of the Ukrainian crisis of 2013 and 2014, Russia redoubled its efforts to strengthen ties in the Western Hemisphere. Mr. Putin visited Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, and Nicaragua.

Among the Russian projects to emerge since then were a 2015 agreement with Nicaragua to let Russian warships access its ports; natural gas exploration and nuclear research in Bolivia; a hydroelectric facility in Ecuador; and bauxite mines in Jamaica and Guyana operated by United Co. Rusal PLC, the aluminum producer whose CEO, Oleg Deripaska, has been involved in business deals central to Kremlin interests.

Russian companies and state agencies also maintain auto-manufacturing, power-generation, and oil operations in Cuba, and Russian oil giant Rosneft is closely linked to Venezuela’s state oil company, Petróleos de Venezuela SA.

While Russia continues its push, a drop in U.S. import levels could encourage Caribbean countries to seek trade relationships elsewhere. In 2016, U.S. imports from the 17 countries of the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act declined for a fifth consecutive year to $5.3 billion, from $11.9 billion in 2012, according to the Department of Commerce.

Among Caribbean countries that have perceived the potential of building ties with Russia, Jamaica appointed a consul to Russia in 2016. Antigua and Barbuda also has a Moscow-based consul, as does Saint Vincent and the Grenadines.

“We maintain our traditional relationships, but we are seeking new relationships at the same time,” said Mr. Steele, the Grenadian government minister. “One cannot expect an island nation to develop on its own.”

Write to Brett Forrest at [email protected]

Appeared in the February 1, 2018, print edition as 'Russia Returns to America’s Backyard.'

galaxy flyer 1st Feb 2018 18:42

Isn’t that part of Hilary’s Reset with Putin. I’m confused is Putin a good guy for Dems AND a bad guy for Republicans?

Rosneft and PdVSA, a match made in purgatory. How’s that working out? Not well, according to the NYT

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/27/w...oil-pdvsa.html

GF

Turbine D 1st Feb 2018 20:30

GF,

Isn’t that part of Hilary’s Reset with Putin. I’m confused is Putin a good guy for Dems AND a bad guy for Republicans?
I'd say you are confused. Regarding Russia, Mr. Trump has consistently claimed that, "Having a good relationship with Russia is a good thing, not a bad thing." Now Trump's handlers may have convinced him that Putin views him as a political patsy, the Trumpster may have ended the love-fest with Vlad, the Trumpster hates to be viewed as a patsy.

Meantime in 2018 while the Trumpster watches Fox News, Fox & Friends and stews over the Russian investigation moving closer to his domain, Vlad is moving forward in the middle-east and now in the Caribbean. Soon Vlad will have a northern plan to carve out a nice chunk of the Arctic waterways as the ice disappears for good. Trump's SOU address was really heavy on detail and substance when it comes to foreign policy and national security, wasn't it?

galaxy flyer 1st Feb 2018 20:47

Didn’t listen, didn’t care. About as worthwhile as a soccer game.

GF

Turbine D 1st Feb 2018 23:21

GF,

Didn’t listen, didn’t care. About as worthwhile as a soccer game.
Don't blame you for not listening or caring. Most of his overly long speech was due to his recognizing of his guests, their accomplishments, not his. The high points were his applauding of himself and then all his followers followed, more time, more applauding. You didn't miss a thing. BTW, I coached soccer for about a dozen years, it came from growing up in a coal mining area. Watching it on TV most often is like watching paint dry or grass grow...

fltlt 2nd Feb 2018 01:47


Originally Posted by Um... lifting... (Post 10038602)
Well, of course they did, once they figured out those resources weren't infinite (though Californians demand for them was and is). There's plenty wrong with those assertions.

If Angelenos and their ilk really believed what you're saying they wouldn't have permitted the plowing up of the L.A. and P.E. Railways in the '40s. But they did. Old money L.A., before talking films, was oil. Old money L.A. still is oil.

Anyway, the powers that be in L.A., having made a hash of public transport, then took and continue to take obscene amounts of cash for the 'freeway' system. L.A. also became the center of 'car culture'. Somewhere in there they decided there might be a bit of a 'smog' problem. But, if your place is in Santa Barbara or Malibu with an ocean breeze, that smog seems so far away.

As for water, yeah, that's probably it. Precious resource. That's why Cali's been sucking off the Colorado River for a century. Have a look at Lake Mead. Los Angeles grew on other people's water, and the construction of the L.A. Aqueduct and accompanying regulation compelled surrounding communities to be annexed by L.A. if they hoped to have anything to drink once the city sucked the aquifer dry. That coupled with the wasteful farming practices in the valleys with no incentive to conserve water have brought California to where it is today. L.A. has in the last decade or so (by court order) magnanimously returned the Owens River to 5% of its pre-aqueduct flow. From 0%.

There's plenty of greed to go around, make no mistake there.

Trump's pretty bad, but if you think that Californians are without sin... think again.

I can remember being on my way to LAX listening to the car radio, mid to late 70’s.
The talk show host was discussing the latest proposed smog regulations.

“If you took every human being out of the LA basin, the plants and natural emissions would exceed the proposed limits”.

“Easiest and cheapest way to meet them is exchange everyone’s vehicle for a brand new Cadillac”.

“The ultimate solution to our problem is hydrogen, and the cheapest way to produce it is to place fast breeder reactors along the Arctic circle”.

Meanwhile, not half a mile away on final approach was a distinctly hazy brown shaped aircraft.

It has gotten a lot better, mainly through regulation on the port ops and oil refinerys, trucks, with automobiles coming in pretty much last.
SQMD drives the over regulation, Sacramento twists the automakers arms to “sell” x% of their vehicle sales in CA as electric or hybrid or they can’t sell any of their models here.
They just announced another $2 billion, yes with a B, as incentives for electrics, otherwise they don’t sell very well.

Social engineering at its best.

cavuman1 2nd Feb 2018 18:05

Nunes Memo Released
 
This should get interesting on both sides of the aisle!

https://www.axios.com/read-nunes-mem...d2f67bcdf.html

Page down ~ twelve lines then press "Read the Memo".

Thoughts?

- Ed

Highway1 2nd Feb 2018 19:24

I can see why the FBI wouldn't want this released. For their own credibility I would have thought they need to come up with a good explanation and some evidence that the wiretap wasn't only based on the Dossier created for the DNC

The Sultan 2nd Feb 2018 19:33

High

That is the point of this charade. The game is that no one can respond with the true story without revealing classified data which might be a crime. Waiting for Cheeto to declassify the whole FISA warrant, but that will never happen.

galaxy flyer 2nd Feb 2018 19:45

Keep spouting the Dems’ lines, Sultan.. The FBI lost on their first FISA request, then went back for a second bite at the apple depending on the “unverified” and “salacious” oppo research paid for by the Clinton campaign. The FBI was using the FISA warrant to commit domestic espionage and disrupt the election. Further, they bet Clinton would win and cover it up.

Comey and the FBI has has the opportunity to rebut and failed.

Richard Nixon is smiling on you.

GF


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