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-   -   War in Australia (any Oz Politics): the Original (https://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/477678-war-australia-any-oz-politics-original.html)

Ethel the Aardvark 20th Apr 2014 01:24

Sorry you all lost me,
Are we whinging about Rudd, Aboriginies or protesters at the moment, nothing like a bit of productive verbal diarrhoea!!
I wish Brandis would pull his finger out so we can really say what we think.
And as for those unwashed climate deniers, don't get me started, what do all those scientists know:ugh:

Dark Knight 20th Apr 2014 01:50

Again; It is all PM Tony Abbott's Fault

Plus the Aboriginals really do not want to `regain their Land and charge Whitey rent'!

Tony’s secret communist race plot

DAVID PENBERTHY HERALD SUN APRIL 19, 2014 8:00PM

It is weird that we can cheer our hearts out for a bloke like Eddie Betts but we can’t find the heart to embrace something which might mean more to a man like him than any white person could ever understand, writes David Penberthy.

TWO Saturdays ago while at the football with my family I was approached by a lady who implored me to write a column about the referendum to recognise Aboriginal people in the Australian Constitution, and the comments by Sydney Swans footballer Adam Goodes in support of that campaign.

The woman was upset by Goodes’ claim that day that our Constitution was “very, very racist”. She was also upset about what she regarded as the fiction of the stolen generation. If she was deeply upset, I was deeply bored.

The prospect of an impromptu chat at the footy on the history of race relations didn’t thrill me and I hope I didn’t sound rude as I explained that I didn’t agree, and was just interested in watching the game. Anyway, this column is for her, even though it’s probably not the column she had in mind.

I can see why people such as this lady were put out by Goodes’ remark. I admire the bloke, both as a footballer and as a leader, but I did feel that he overdid it when he fired up about the 13-year-old girl who called him a name during a game in Melbourne last year. I am not sure whether that girl meant that word as a racist term, or a generalised insult she might have aimed at anyone of any hue. This sad episode may have had less to do with the time-old question of racism than the more modern problems of manners.

The difference between Adam Goodes, the 13-year-old girl, the lady at the footy and me is that only one of us is an indigenous Australian who knows what it is like to experience the treatment blokes such as Goodes have faced. We can either huff and puff about what Goodes said, be it last year at the footy, or two weeks ago about the Constitution, or we can listen to it and try to empathise.

We can also ignore it completely and focus instead on the policy matter at hand.

The usual inflamers are billing the referendum as a precursor to billions of dollars in compo for past wrongs, a rewriting of other laws, a new era in unchecked welfare. It’s none of those things. Nor is it some attempt by militants in the so-called Aboriginal “industry” — a term coined by Pauline Hanson — to expand their power. It’s a funny term that, Aboriginal industry. If it were an industry it would have gone into receivership years ago, as its defining features are higher rates of mortality, unemployment, incarceration, alcoholism and domestic violence.

The argument for a yes vote is in fact being spearheaded by the Prime Minister of Australia, Tony Abbott, who used his New Year’s Day message this year to start a conversation about the recognition of indigenous people as the First Australians. If the whole thing is a communist plot, Tony Abbott makes an unusual frontman. Mr Abbott’s position is in keeping with a longstanding commitment to practical reconciliation, which in 2009 saw him criticise John Howard for failing to apologise to the stolen generation.

In championing constitutional change, Mr Abbott has simply billed it as a chance to modernise the Constitution and reflect our true heritage. What matters most are the words which are being deleted and introduced.

These are the changes: remove section 25 — which says the states can ban people from voting based on their race; remove section 51 (xxvi) — which can be used to pass laws that discriminate against people based on their race; insert a new section 51A — to recognise Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and to preserve the Australian Government’s ability to pass laws for the benefit of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples; insert a new section 116A, banning racial discrimination by government; and insert a new section 127A, recognising Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages were this country’s first tongues, while confirming that English is Australia’s national language.

It is not even close to radical. Instead of getting sidetracked by a blue about Adam Goodes, or any other side issue, we should ask two simple questions. Do we want any government in Australia to have the power to make racially based laws against any group of people? Are we prepared to be polite enough to acknowledge that when Europeans arrived, Aboriginal people were here happily minding their own business, and as such should be counted as the First Australians?

The answer to question one should be an automatic no.

The answer to question two should be a generous yes. There is no point getting bogged down in mischievous, baseless hypotheticals about whether recognising indigenous heritage could lead to something else. It will not. It is simply a case of recognising a historical truth. It must be a hell of thing to feel like a second-class citizen in your own country, governed by a Constitution which pretends you were never there.

That day at the footy my side got done, badly. About the only high point was the ceaseless effort of a bloke called Eddie Betts, an Aboriginal Australian, who like so many others has shone at our national game. It is weird that we can cheer our hearts out for a bloke like Eddie Betts but we can’t find the heart to embrace something which might mean more to a man like him than any white person could ever understand.

bosnich71 20th Apr 2014 05:44

Ethel ... I didn't realise that you ever 'had us'.

D,K. ..and your point is?

Captain Sand Dune 20th Apr 2014 06:32

That only white Anglo Saxon males are racist?:E

Saltie 20th Apr 2014 22:23

War in Australia (any Oz Politics)
 
Nifty Nev has gone to meet his Maker. And the platitudes are rolling thick and fast.

The only really truthful one I have heard to date was from Bob Carr, who said Nifty taught him everything he knew. Given Carr's murky form, Nifty's family might not be too pleased with that particular accolade.

I can remember some journo being interviewed on the ABC not long after Wran took over NSW from the thoroughly corrupt Liberal Premier Robin Askin when he said the only thing that had changed corruption wise was the bank account numbers.

alisoncc 20th Apr 2014 22:33


Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose.
From NSW Labor to NSW Liberal - Still the same level of corruption. From the Obeids to BoF & Sinodinos.

Saltie 20th Apr 2014 22:39

War in Australia (any Oz Politics)
 
Whilst conceding you might have a point, Alison, I think the current crop of Libs are babes in the woods compared with Eddie and all his Labor mates in the corruption stakes. Give them a few more years in power though, and they'll be at his heels I'm sure. But hopefully a bit less blatantly than Eddie and Co.

Captain Sand Dune 20th Apr 2014 22:45

Did anyone else catch the irony in one of the video ‘grabs’ where Nifty stated; “the best thing about being working class is getting out of it”?
Speaks volumes to me about today's Labour.
Not something I expected the adoring ALPBC to air!

500N 20th Apr 2014 22:53

CSD
'
Yes, I had a chuckle at that comment as well.

Also who his two best mates were ;)

He was "front and centre" just after I came to Aus so featured
prominently in my memories of my new country.

Saltie 20th Apr 2014 23:31

War in Australia (any Oz Politics)
 
I think Nev was the paragon that all succeeding NSW Labor ministers set themselves to emulate. (How do I put a smilie in here?)

He made one of his post politics fortunes from a cleaning company, didn't he? A cleaning company that magically won many large government contracts?

alisoncc 20th Apr 2014 23:36


Whilst conceding you might have a point, Alison, I think the current crop of Libs are babes in the woods compared with Eddie and all his Labor mates in the corruption stakes.
Only due to a lack of opportunity I suspect. Give them time.

rh200 21st Apr 2014 00:51


Did anyone else catch the irony in one of the video ‘grabs’ where Nifty stated; “the best thing about being working class is getting out of it”?
Speaks volumes to me about today's Labour.
Standard social/ communist dogma and MO. You make every one equal (that translates to piss poor, uneducated except for correct thinking) and then a small select few party members get the benifits, and live the high life in private.

Takan Inchovit 21st Apr 2014 01:22


... and then a small select few party members get the benifits, and live the high life in private.
I just cant envisage Jules lying on a banana chair in a string bikini with a pina colada and being attended to by women in sensible shoes. Oh, wait a minute, maybe I was wrong. :ooh:

Captain Sand Dune 21st Apr 2014 02:08


I just cant envisage Jules lying on a banana chair in a string bikini with a pina colada
Thanks for that mental image:yuk:
Although I remember a couple of years ago the red bandana wearing prat waxing lyrical on how hot Julya was looking. No accounting for taste.:rolleyes:

rh200 21st Apr 2014 06:40


I just cant envisage Jules lying on a banana chair in a string bikini with a pina colada and being attended to by women in sensible shoes.
Nice strong hips, just what do you mean by "attended by":E.

Opps, I think I've seen to many of those movies you get in the ACT:p

CoodaShooda 22nd Apr 2014 00:22

Neville Wran has been described as suffering from dementia in his later years. Is this because of comments like...


In 2011, he said Labor had “lost its way” and the party was no longer fielding candidates with a diversity of life experience.

“It is university, union, ministerial or MP’s office and then stand for an election,” he said. “If you’ve been in that cloistered world, how can you expect to know what the real world is like, what issues the real people face and the aims and aspirations of those real people?”
By that yardstick, I must be demented too.

Worrals in the wilds 22nd Apr 2014 01:06

Don't worry; Shorten's on the same track at the moment, declaring that the party needs to separate from the unions. He has a point (particularly wrt directly electing candidates) but so far he hasn't offered to return the affiliation fees...:hmm::}

Bill Shorten's sweeping Labor reform plan to reduce union influence | brisbanetimes.com.au

Clare Prop 22nd Apr 2014 01:25

Isn't that like trying to separate conjoined twins who share all their organs but have two (identical) heads?

I think he's just trying a last gasp at some kind of credibility before the RC confirms what many people suspect about how some unions are run. One of which BS himself was head of as I understand it?

Thank goodness the ALP don't have any Tony Blair types, slimy fabians who can convince disaffected voters that they care about anything other than the NWO.

CoodaShooda 22nd Apr 2014 02:01

I'm reminded of a couple of Sir Humphreyisms along the lines of :-

"Never kick away the ladder that you have climbed to the top, particularly if you are still standing on it." and

"What are you left with when you have cleaned up a dung heap? Nothing; but you are covered in dung."

I'm now ordering in a year's supply of popcorn. :E

Saltie 22nd Apr 2014 03:47

I saw Shorten on last night's news and was reminded of a rabbit caught in a spotlight - a rabbit just smart enough to know that behind that spotlight is a set of crosshairs.

'Watership Down' it was not.


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