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Any old iron...

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Any old iron...

Old 15th Jun 2022, 17:24
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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A friend who works trackside on London Underground reckons that the cost of removing redundant track now exceeds its scrap value. Therefore, in many cases, it is disconnected from the active lines and simply left to rust and generally get overgrown. It doesn't present a very good image to travellers though !
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Old 15th Jun 2022, 17:37
  #22 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by Ancient Observer View Post
Whilst I do not want to derail this thread, are we all sure it is on the right lines? Maybe diverted due to the Graduate Engineering works?
nil points for that one!
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Old 15th Jun 2022, 17:45
  #23 (permalink)  
 
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Once watched two scroats trying to load about two feet of rail into a shopping trolley presumably to go and weigh it in. They didn't succeed and were so concentrated on their actions they didn't see an approaching police van.
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Old 15th Jun 2022, 21:06
  #24 (permalink)  
 
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the cost of removing redundant track now exceeds its scrap value.
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Old 15th Jun 2022, 21:40
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No grease or lubricant of any kind is good nor applied on a rail head it is simply friction that keeps them shiny.
Yes, I know that no grease is applied deliberately, except on tight corners. So; how do the sides and bottom of the active rails - areas not touched by the wheels or flanges - remain rust free ? Whereas the loose unattached rails that are not part of the active track but left lying between the active rails rust all over?
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Old 15th Jun 2022, 23:45
  #26 (permalink)  
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“Why do steel railways not rust and fall apart?”

Why do steel railways not rust and fall apart? ? The Helpful Engineer
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Old 16th Jun 2022, 04:08
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Just glad they didn't scrap this Big Boy! Something to see under steam!

Photo Credit: Roy Inman, Kansas City Star
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Old 16th Jun 2022, 05:16
  #28 (permalink)  
 
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The head of a rail these days goes through a heat treatment to prolong wear life, details here.

.https://www.nipponsteel.com/en/tech/...pdf/105-05.pdf

Railway defects handbook

https://www.transport.nsw.gov.au/sys...19/tmc-226.pdf
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Old 16th Jun 2022, 08:13
  #29 (permalink)  
 
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I believe scrap rail and chairs from old bullhead rail fetch about £50 to £100 per ton. Rail typically these days is around 120lb to the yard so you need to salvage a lot of it to make it worth collecting. I believe some heritage railways do, because of course. much of their labour is free.
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Old 16th Jun 2022, 15:36
  #30 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by treadigraph View Post
Noticed several times recently that there are an amazing number of rusting lengths of old steel railway track and/or third rail strewn along the approaches to Woking station, along side the line or resting on the sleepers between each track's rails. Also noticed similar sights elsewhere on the Network Rail estate.

Just curious as to why it is left in situ, surely it has some reuse value as scrap metal?
Because the railways are run by men

If they were run by women, then someone would be told to go and pick them all up because they made the place look untidy
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Old 17th Jun 2022, 13:02
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I have a foot or so of used railway rail, it makes a really handy anvil if I want to do a bit of rivetting or forming on the days I can lift it onto a stand!

Rans6.......
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Old 17th Jun 2022, 13:22
  #32 (permalink)  
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Thanks for answers! Just curious...

Mate recently asked if we'd heard of the Surrey Iron Railway and sent a link to a local newspaper item about it, supposedly one of Britain's first commercial railways. Well, yes I had, mostly because the 8' wall at the end of my garden supports the track bed of the Croydon to Merstham section - now used as an access road to people's garages. You could say I have ferrous at the bottom of my garden... Several commemorative bits in a local park.
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Old 17th Jun 2022, 17:05
  #33 (permalink)  
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Meanwhile, some college students weren’t slow to take advantage of an idle streetcar:

In the 1930s, Ken Wadleigh and four other MIT students welded a streetcar to its rails. They distracted the motorman and then set off thermite bombs to weld the wheels. Wadleigh became a dean at MIT.
The streetcar used to run down the Main Street that cut through the campus.
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