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Donner Kebab - what meat is it?

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Donner Kebab - what meat is it?

Old 23rd Apr 2022, 07:40
  #41 (permalink)  
 
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Hamburger, sausage or Döner Kebap it all boils down to the use of the less fancy parts of animals to create food that can be offered cheaper and leaves not much waste. Spices and colour will make up for the differences to traditional "red meat".
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Old 23rd Apr 2022, 08:17
  #42 (permalink)  
 
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My favourite sausages are 'Smyrna sausages' made wine soaked bread and minced veal, bound with beaten egg, rolled in flour and fried in olive oil. At least you know what's in them especially if you mince veal chunks!
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Old 23rd Apr 2022, 09:57
  #43 (permalink)  
 
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Never eaten one, probably because of the scandal when some were found to have maggots in from reheating several times. But all these 'treats' are a result of wanting to eat 'peoples' food from assorted countries. Upmarket restaurants tend to be similar about the world. Local small places serve more interesting food. But best eaten in the country concerned, not UK.

Last edited by DownWest; 23rd Apr 2022 at 14:10.
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Old 23rd Apr 2022, 09:57
  #44 (permalink)  
 
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I've only ever had a couple of doner kebabs, and the only one I can remember enjoying was made from goat, in an Arabic area of Sydney.
I've always been fairly adventurous when it comes to food, and jellied eels, as sold in DJ's food hall many years ago, tempted me. Bloody terrible, one of the few foods that tastes better coming back up than it did going down. Strangely though, I like eel when prepared by the Japanese.
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Old 23rd Apr 2022, 10:38
  #45 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by radeng View Post
My favourite sausages are 'Smyrna sausages' made wine soaked bread and minced veal, bound with beaten egg, rolled in flour and fried in olive oil. At least you know what's in them especially if you mince veal chunks!
Those sound like the most abhorrent concoction yet mentioned.

This on the basis the constituent ingredient is veal...which I refuse to eat as a matter of principle. Comes from the same refusal as my grandfather, who was a countryman, and my father .

Even with so called "humane " husbandry, the production is still repellent
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Old 23rd Apr 2022, 10:55
  #46 (permalink)  
 
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When I was a kid I had some books that claimed by now the world would rely entirely on plankton to feed the people as we would have run out of everything else. Maybe it's time to invent the plankton kebab?
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Old 23rd Apr 2022, 11:55
  #47 (permalink)  
 
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Best not to think what's in it. There was a great kebab shop in LKF Hong Kong which soaked up the beers nicely at the time... Probably the chilli and garlic sauce was not a wise decision.
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Old 23rd Apr 2022, 12:16
  #48 (permalink)  

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Selling Vegan Doner Kebabs round our way now.
Yet another meat shaped vegan delight for those who cannot quite tear themselves away from sausage and burger shapes :-)

El G.

Last edited by El Grifo; 23rd Apr 2022 at 17:45.
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Old 23rd Apr 2022, 17:18
  #49 (permalink)  
 
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[QUOTE][My favourite sausages are 'Smyrna sausages/QUOTE]
Σμυρναίικα σουτζουκάκια - one of my favourites.
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Old 23rd Apr 2022, 20:30
  #50 (permalink)  
 
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Eel left in a tub of clean water overnight, despatched and skinned ( no mean feat, it's like trying to get wet socks off) then poached in milk and pepper is quite tasty, and doesn't carry the risk of unexpected bones either.
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Old 24th Apr 2022, 00:20
  #51 (permalink)  
 
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Fifty years ago, my hometown of Atlanta, Georgia, witnessed the soft opening of an eatery called the Gyro Wrap. Being Southern and therefore immune to the laws of logical pronunciation, we called it the Gyro (as in aircraft instrumentation, not Hero) Warp, as in "I canna keep her at this speed much longer before she shakes apart, Captain!")

Freshly baked pita bread lovingly embraced a massive amount of thinly cut lamb/beef/? delicately layered with fresh lettuce and onion, then topped with a quarter cup of cool tzatziki sauce. Heaven! I ate there often and never got sick but always got full.

The day the "Warp" sold their first "Gy-ro" all those years ago, the customers lined up for an entire city block. I am given to believe that the line continues to be that long. Good food, reasonably priced, is a winning combination. Oh, they had excellent fries/chips as well.

Damn if I ain't hungry now.

- Ed
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Old 24th Apr 2022, 00:30
  #52 (permalink)  
 
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I like the cheeseburgers they serve at PDK , the cheese in inside the patty . Not far from Stone Mountain , worth the trip .
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Old 24th Apr 2022, 11:29
  #53 (permalink)  
 
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TLDMCL,

Rupert Croft- Cooke in his book 'English Cooking' describes how to skin an eel. Swedish smoked eel I quite like: the thought of jellied eel, like brains, puts me off. Frogs legs, I don't like the texture of and escargots are just an excuse for eating bread an garlic butter. For something really obnoxious, i don't think you can beat chitlings - or chitterlins, is apparently an alternative spelling- except perhaps, tripe.
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Old 24th Apr 2022, 12:59
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Rush, that was probably an Ebeneezers, they were scattered around the drinking areas of Hong Kong. I have partaken of several midnight snacks out of the one in Wanchai, and at the time the sandwich seemed the food of the gods.

Walking past them in daylight, sober was a revelation but mysteriously I was never sick from them.
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Old 24th Apr 2022, 21:19
  #55 (permalink)  
 
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I have woken up next to more uneaten Kebabs than I care to remember. Probably more than I've actually eaten. They go straight in the bin - do people actually eat the things sober?
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Old 24th Apr 2022, 21:47
  #56 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by rudestuff View Post
I have woken up next to more uneaten Kebabs than I care to remember. Probably more than I've actually eaten. They go straight in the bin - do people actually eat the things sober?
I've certainly woken up with currywurst stuck to my cheek more than once.
Young, drunk and stupid. Things are going well though, I've managed to conquer the "young" part of the combination.
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Old 25th Apr 2022, 06:12
  #57 (permalink)  
 
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It’s not donner or doner, it’s döner. Originally developed in Berlin by Turkish immigrants, it has spread around Europe and is available under multiple names and with various ingredients; the Arabian version is the Shawarma, the Greek is Gyros, but it’s essentially the same thing.

The UK version is usually wrapped in a flatbread, which would actually make it a dürüm and not a döner.

The “correct” meat in either a shawarma, döner or dürum is interlaced slices of lamb and beef, seasoned and spiced to give it a distinct taste. Chicken is another popular option, but doesn’t do it for me. The seasoning and spices used varies from country to country and, indeed, from region to region in e.g. Turkey.

It’s a fantastic meal, but as is with many things in England, the quality is not always what it could be. Try it in Turkey or, even better, try the original döner kebab in Berlin.

I’ve rarely, if ever, eaten it when drunk.
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Old 25th Apr 2022, 06:31
  #58 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by radeng View Post
TLDMCL,

Rupert Croft- Cooke in his book 'English Cooking' describes how to skin an eel. Swedish smoked eel I quite like: the thought of jellied eel, like brains, puts me off. Frogs legs, I don't like the texture of and escargots are just an excuse for eating bread an garlic butter. For something really obnoxious, i don't think you can beat chitlings - or chitterlins, is apparently an alternative spelling- except perhaps, tripe.
In Portugal, local places do a version of Cozida Portuguesa with tripe. A bean dish, it really is quite good.
Eels with a tomato and onion sauce can be very good too.
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Old 25th Apr 2022, 06:35
  #59 (permalink)  
 
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When in Berlin here is a good one: Hasir. Not sure who officially claims to be the Döner inventor.
"Hasir Kreuzberg" is their original place. Standorte ? Has?r Berlin

Menu: http://www.hasir.de/pdf/kreuzberg_speisekarte.pdf
I prefer their meat skewers served restaurant style like Beyti Kebap - Yufka ekmekli.
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Old 25th Apr 2022, 11:37
  #60 (permalink)  
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I used to enjoy a kebab after a few beers in the evening and would bolt the whole thing down in one sitting. More recently I find eating later in the day gives me an uncomfortable night's sleep unless I restrain myself to eat just a small portion. Now I find it more cost effective to buy a slightly larger kebab and only eat half, earlier in the day, keeping the rest in the fridge for a hearty elevenses the following day. We do the same with take away noodle meals, buy the larger one and keep half for the next day. In both cases the original is taken home, divided in two and the first portion in popped into the microwave to get it back to piping hot. I still eat the kebab with my fingers, it is part of the experience! Noodle meals are a good excuse to practice my chop stick skills.

Rans6
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