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Baggage should be placed in . . . baggage holds

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Baggage should be placed in . . . baggage holds

Old 13th Apr 2022, 17:47
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Downwind_Left View Post
That's just a lightweight piece of plastic trim adjacent to the overhead crew rest area on the A350. That is most definitely not how overhead lockers are attached to the aircraft structure.
I agree - particularly given the modern trend for narrow-bodies (newer/retrofitted B738s for example) to have lockers deep enough to accommodate carry-ons stored edge-on, with a consequent increase in weight per linear foot:



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Old 14th Apr 2022, 08:17
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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Must be some 30 or more years ago, I had a flight from Copenhagen (old terminal) to Aalborg on an SAS internal flight - DC9, of course.. We walked out to the plane (just outside the door) with luggage and placed it on a trolley, from where it was immediately loaded. By the time everyone was seated and the safety briefing given (in three languages, because there were Danes, English and French passengers) the bags were loaded. When we arrived at Aalborg, the bags were being unloaded onto another trolley and you just picked up your bag and left. Extremely fast and efficient, compared to the usual palaver these days....Wouldn't work for a 777 load, though....
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Old 14th Apr 2022, 08:37
  #23 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by NutLoose View Post
I would ban Alcohol bottle sales on aircraft too, they are bottles of a combustable fluid usually then stuck in an overhead locker and a potential hazard in turbulence or a crash, far better for the crew to sell you a "token bottle", but give you a voucher instead to be redeemed at the airport on landing prior to clearing customs, it also cuts down on weight and saves on fuel burn..
I've mentioned before that Anthony Smith wrote an article in Flight in around 1980 discussing the advantages - safety, fuel burn, etc - of picking up duty free at your destination rather than the departure end. As he said, there you are aboard a 747 mid-Atlantic toting several hundred bottles of tax free booze passing another 747 going the other way with a near identical load...

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Old 14th Apr 2022, 09:23
  #24 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by treadigraph View Post
I've mentioned before that Anthony Smith wrote an article in Flight in around 1980 discussing the advantages - safety, fuel burn, etc - of picking up duty free at your destination rather than the departure end. As he said, there you are aboard a 747 mid-Atlantic toting several hundred bottles of tax free booze passing another 747 going the other way with a near identical load...
Good point - I wonder just how far the average bottle travels before being sold...
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Old 14th Apr 2022, 09:44
  #25 (permalink)  
 
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Surely that demands a higher price.... just add a certificate stating that 'this bottle was flown around the European Union on SleazyJet Fairbus OE-123' and you can sell it as a limited edition!
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Old 28th Apr 2022, 00:19
  #26 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Tartiflette Fan View Post
C'mon Nutty - What you suggest is reasonable, but far too complicated " Miss, miss , can I get half-bottles of Glayva in Terminal 2 at Schipol and how much do they cost " ? Is this practised anywhere in the world ? Are there any regulations or agreements that forbid arriving passengers from using duty-free shops after touch-down ( not discussing transit here ) ?
I would imagine they are in the departures lounge area, not arrivals, hence yes.
It would fall upon the airlines to ensure the shops stocked their products, most would be generic with the odd special brand.
If you have an aircraft carrying say 150 pax then you will stock the galley of the aircraft with expected sales, it cannot be rocket science to do the same shop wise and I cannot see why the aircraft cannot transmit the data in flight to the destination with the items required.

Shops in the departure lounges could also still sell items and also issue a voucher for collection at the destination, think Argos, you look in the catalogue, pick your items, pay and they bring the goods out to you, the only difference would be they would bring them out to you in a different country. Rather like click and collect.
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Old 28th Apr 2022, 00:32
  #27 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by treadigraph View Post
I've mentioned before that Anthony Smith wrote an article in Flight in around 1980 discussing the advantages - safety, fuel burn, etc - of picking up duty free at your destination rather than the departure end. As he said, there you are aboard a 747 mid-Atlantic toting several hundred bottles of tax free booze passing another 747 going the other way with a near identical load...
Except who buys "duty free" anyway?

tbh, I've found that it's cheaper to get home, go to the local liquor store and buy it there
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Old 28th Apr 2022, 01:14
  #28 (permalink)  
 
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Yes and no, NAAFI duty free when there was one were larger bottles than standard fare.. it’s also tobacco and perfumes etc that can be removed.
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Old 28th Apr 2022, 09:27
  #29 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by DaveReidUK View Post
I agree - particularly given the modern trend for narrow-bodies (newer/retrofitted B738s for example) to have lockers deep enough to accommodate carry-ons stored edge-on, with a consequent increase in weight per linear foot:

All four of those have wheels. What happened to the carry on bit?
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Old 28th Apr 2022, 09:32
  #30 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by Sue VÍtements View Post
Except who buys "duty free" anyway?
I never have...
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Old 28th Apr 2022, 14:08
  #31 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Carry0nLuggage View Post
All four of those have wheels. What happened to the carry on bit?
You obviously don't fly Ryanair or EasyJet.
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Old 28th Apr 2022, 21:01
  #32 (permalink)  
 
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treadigraph
Sorry I always do inbound to UK as the Gin,s I, and indeed Mrs Mac like duty free, are around 48%, where as the same brand in the UK are distilled at around 40% for the tax break, and do taste different as a result. As I am lucky (?) to fly quite a bit there is usually always a bottle with me or indeed Perfume or Cigars etc if someone asks me to bring something if I have time.

Cheers
Mr Mac
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Old 29th Apr 2022, 06:27
  #33 (permalink)  
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We were flying Jetstar CG to SY pre COVID.
They weighed and labelled each piece of carry on.
7Kg.
I hope it still in practice.
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Old 29th Apr 2022, 06:58
  #34 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by visibility3miles View Post
If you put everything in a carry-on, you avoid fees on some airlines and greatly reduce the risk of lost luggage. Plus, you don’t have to waste time at the baggage carousel waiting to pick up your luggage.

I store heavier items, like a laptop computer, under the seat in front of me, where it is not likely to fly around in turbulent weather.
Unless you need to bring heavy items or items that must go into a cargo hold when flying, I find it's far preferable to pack only carry on baggage for most situations. It forces you to think and pack only what is necessary. Not too difficult at all, plenty of resources available online to show how to pack intelligently and only take the necessary items for any trip to any destination or climate, even if you are traveling for months. Taking too much weighs you down and slows you down.

It always amuses me to see tourists pull a huge suitcase off a baggage carousel packed to the max for a couple of days at a summer destination where they'll be in shorts and t-shirts most of the time.

Or if you want to go to the extreme:


Last edited by dr dre; 29th Apr 2022 at 07:39.
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