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EU to ban non-replaceable batteries in 2023*

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EU to ban non-replaceable batteries in 2023*

Old 13th Mar 2022, 21:47
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EU to ban non-replaceable batteries in 2023*

https://www.focus.de/digital/digital..._66878922.html

There is a proposal that from Jan 2023 rechargeable-batteries in all consumer apparatus would have to be replaceable using ordinary tools: this will not become law until approved by the Council of Ministers*. There is also a proposal to introduce a "deposit" scheme on batteries containing lithium, nickel, cobalt and lead to improve recycling rates: the aim is 90% by 2026.

Intelligent proposals in my view.

Last edited by Tartiflette Fan; 13th Mar 2022 at 22:18. Reason: Added rechargeable for clarity
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Old 13th Mar 2022, 21:52
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Can't see anything not to like at the moment. At least it will get rid of those musical greetings cards.
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Old 13th Mar 2022, 22:07
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Tartiflette,
Not sure, I thought your original post said non- changeable. I'm not very good in German but I think it indicates a proposal banning non-rechargeable batteries unless they can be changed by the user... but I stand to be corrected. If it doesn't apply to rechargeable we'll still be in the same position re iPhones etc.
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Old 13th Mar 2022, 22:14
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It's about 'Akkus', so rechargeable batteries, that will have to be replaceable using ordinary tools
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Old 13th Mar 2022, 22:15
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Originally Posted by NRU74 View Post
Tartiflette,
Not sure, I thought your original post said non- changeable. I'm not very good in German but I think it indicates a proposal banning non-rechargeable batteries unless they can be changed by the user... but I stand to be corrected. If it doesn't apply to rechargeable we'll still be in the same position re iPhones etc.
It did. To me changeable/replaceable are synonymous but replaceable reads better (after a little more reflection). This has nothing to do with recharging, but replacing the battery when it's dead. A little more information : this regulation is to apply to batteries up to 5 kg;

Last edited by Senior Pilot; 14th Mar 2022 at 01:31. Reason: Layout
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Old 14th Mar 2022, 01:27
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Google translate is helpful - or appears to be:
The EU Parliament has agreed on a future ban on permanently installed rechargeable batteries in technical devices. Users should be able to replace batteries with standard tools. Gluing or permanently installing batteries should be prohibited. The regulation is to apply from 2023.

The European Parliament would like to ban permanently installed or glued batteries in order to extend the repairability and thus the service life of electronic devices. Users should be able to exchange the power storage in smartphones, computers, headphones, electric toothbrushes, but also e-bikes and scooters with commercially available tools.

The European Parliament approved a corresponding proposal by the EU Commission for the more sustainable use of batteries and partially expanded it. The Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung (FAZ) reported first.
It has interesting implications because quite a lot of equipment in the list would appear to require a significant re-design and change in manufacture to comply. Given all of this, the time frame will be difficult to meet.
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Old 14th Mar 2022, 01:59
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The world is going to hell in a hand basket and the EU wants to ban permanently installed batteries - really? Just remind me why the British people decided to leave the EU?
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Old 14th Mar 2022, 02:20
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Originally Posted by Count of Monte Bisto View Post
The world is going to hell in a hand basket and the EU wants to ban permanently installed batteries - really? Just remind me why the British people decided to leave the EU?
I have numerous devices in my home including phones, tablets and smaller gizmos whose battery lives are a fraction of what they were when they were new. There is no easy way to replace these glued in batteries so I'm left with the choice of chucking an otherwise perfect device in the bin or suffer on with miserable battery life. I would gladly accept a slightly larger fom factor in order to be able to replace a battery even for purely selfish reasons regardless of its long term sustainability benefits to the planet. I'm all for this approach. The UK can do whatever if wants and good luck but I hope that the EU goes ahead with this one!
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Old 14th Mar 2022, 03:26
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Some of the equipment I own - for which the battery is inside the case and therefore not readily and easily replaceable can - in fact be replaced by repair booths and other similar service centres - you just need the 'know how' and have the right tools.

However, I agree that where this is not the case - well - that's a bad and wasteful design and that should not happen. There is far too much of this already, As an example, we have a perfectly serviceable vacuum cleaner right up to the primary floor tool. It failed, and a replacement for it is longer available.

Of course this does indeed seem a rather trivial priority when the dreadful events on its eastern perimeters might perhaps be a more pressing matter for EU think tanks ... No?
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Old 14th Mar 2022, 04:42
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Originally Posted by Count of Monte Bisto View Post
The world is going to hell in a hand basket and the EU wants to ban permanently installed batteries - really? Just remind me why the British people decided to leave the EU?
Itís a great example of the value of an entity like the EU. The waste and pollution from the crazy system of non replaceable batteries is unacceptable, but manufacturers have no incentive to fix it, in fact they are incentivized to build in obsolescence by means of fixed batteries. Luckily the EU is big enough that the UK would likely benefit from such regulation despite the fact that itís no longer a member.
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Old 14th Mar 2022, 06:40
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Old 14th Mar 2022, 07:29
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I have a tablet device for a bank account activation provided by the bank. Recently the devices battery expired so I removed two screws and replaced a large 1p sized battery which was just in a holder. I then switched it back on to find it wouldn't work, contacted the bank and they said "oh we just send you a new device".
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Old 14th Mar 2022, 07:39
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Iím a little bit conflicted on this one. Yes, itís a laudable aim to reduce e-waste, but in reality I think it will make things worse.

Why? Unless the devices use standard cells (in which case it is likely they are in a compartment that can be accessed easily anyway), you will be reliant on being able to find a suitable replacement custom battery when the capacity of the original decreases to the point it is badly affecting the use of the device. With a decent modern cell pack, this can be a long time in the future - cycles are measured in 1,000s now, so what are the chances of obtaining a new one that fits?

If itís about the user being able to change the battery, what do you think is going to happen to the old one? 99% are going to be tossed in the bin, IMO. Also, if a replacement device is cheaper than a new battery, the whole thing will get thrown away. Far better to insist that manufacturers have an obligation to a) replace the battery when it wears out for a reasonable cost and/or b) recycle the entire device if it is no longer needed.

If it is to be easily dismantled with a screwdriver, then itís probably going to end up bulkier, heavier and it will be more difficult to make it with the same IP-rating. That likely means more expensive and less good at the job than it was before. So, worse for the user and worse for the environment, thatís unintended consequences for you...
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Old 14th Mar 2022, 08:33
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One presumes pacemakers and other medical implants are excluded -, although having dealt with the European Commission, it would not surprise me at all to see them included!
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Old 14th Mar 2022, 08:40
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So it's no more birthday cards that play a tune. Meanwhile, the number of different charges required for the array of mobile devices, power packs and other stuff continues to grow unchecked.

Who is paying the wages of these idiots ?
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Old 14th Mar 2022, 08:41
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Originally Posted by FullWings View Post
Iím a little bit conflicted on this one. Yes, itís a laudable aim to reduce e-waste, but in reality I think it will make things worse.

Why? Unless the devices use standard cells (in which case it is likely they are in a compartment that can be accessed easily anyway), you will be reliant on being able to find a suitable replacement custom battery when the capacity of the original decreases to the point it is badly affecting the use of the device. With a decent modern cell pack, this can be a long time in the future - cycles are measured in 1,000s now, so what are the chances of obtaining a new one that fits?

If itís about the user being able to change the battery, what do you think is going to happen to the old one? 99% are going to be tossed in the bin, IMO. Also, if a replacement device is cheaper than a new battery, the whole thing will get thrown away. Far better to insist that manufacturers have an obligation to a) replace the battery when it wears out for a reasonable cost and/or b) recycle the entire device if it is no longer needed.

If it is to be easily dismantled with a screwdriver, then itís probably going to end up bulkier, heavier and it will be more difficult to make it with the same IP-rating. That likely means more expensive and less good at the job than it was before. So, worse for the user and worse for the environment, thatís unintended consequences for you...
I have a container for spent batteries, I chuck spent ones into it and when it gets full I take them to a recycling point. Also solves the issue of what to do when you come across a battery and you are not sure if is good or not - not in the box = good.
Not sure how likely it is that a device can cost less than the battery it contains.
To my mind, it is ludicrous that you cannot change the battery of an expensive device such as a phone or tablet computer, just so you can end up with a marginally thinner product. Devices can be designed so that the battery can be replaced without recourse to a screwdriver, TV remotes, clocks, earlier marques of mobile phone all come to mind.
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Old 14th Mar 2022, 08:51
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Think I paid £120 for my current phone three years ago which has a non-changeable battery. Battery life is definitely reduced now, replacement by undertaken by Samsung was £60 last time I looked. Replacement phone is going to be £200 plus. Do I want to pay £60 for a new battery for a phone which may suffer other tech issues as it ages? Nah. New phone, keep old one as a back up. Oh, apparently the Samsung phone I'm thinking about buying has a slightly different charging cable...
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Old 14th Mar 2022, 09:18
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I currently use a sony xperia E5 which originally belonged to a deceased relative,recently the battery life has become bizzarely inconsistent - so I bought a 'genuine' Sony replacement battery from ebay for a whopping £2.53 inc postage (will ye no be havin a sale ?).
Anyway yesterday when I returned from my daily walk I found the phone had switched itself off - I restarted it and the battery ind was showing 1.0 % LOL.
OK time to fit the new and expensive battery - it is not really supposed to be a user changeable battery but I watched a video made by a dodgy guy on youtube and now as a newly fully qualified phone technician I set about carefully removing the back cover,I placed the phone on top of a warm heater to slightly soften the plastic,managed to crack open the cover with a small ultra sharp knife (without stabbing meself) and replaced the suspect battery - I honestly could not have done it without the video because of the way the battery fits and the ultra small plug on a little umbilical which comes out of the battery.
Phone now charged up and it will be interesting to see if the 'genuine' sony battery is any good .
Pic below showing the tiny umbilical plug which is sneakily folded back over the battery whilst in packaging.


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Old 14th Mar 2022, 09:25
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I forgot to add that I had bought a mobile phone repair kit some years ago off ebay (circa £3.00) which has about 20 ? handy metal and plastic gizmos to assist getting at phone batteries etc,once I had 'cracked' open the cover I gently prised it off with one of the plastic tools in the super expensive tool kit - it has come in handy for various batteries in satnavs,phones and other electronic [email protected]
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Old 14th Mar 2022, 09:41
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Iíve successfully replaced a couple of mobile phone batteries in the past but had to admit defeat over one waterproof iPhone where the outer layer was stuck with a bead of hard sealant. Apparently it is possible to soften this with a heat gun but bearing in mind it wasnít my phone I decided against it.
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