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Storm Eunice

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Storm Eunice

Old 18th Feb 2022, 22:26
  #81 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Kiltrash View Post
The only damage we suffered as the bins and garden stuff were re located to the garage was the loft trapdoor being sucked up into the loft ..
Blame Daniel Bernoulli.
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Old 18th Feb 2022, 22:59
  #82 (permalink)  
DP.
 
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A busy day for pilots, ATC and pretty much everyone else in the industry.

I think the strangest once I noticed today was FR3806 FUE-MAN, which had one attempt at landing at around 1615 before immediately diverting all the way to BOD. There were other aircraft which landed around the same time, including a company (FR2132) directly behind. Bordeaux is lovely, but it seemed a long old divert after a flight from the Canaries!
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Old 19th Feb 2022, 00:44
  #83 (permalink)  
See and avoid
 
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Decades ago, I was trying to land a small plane with around a 17 knot crosswind, give or take, which is the limit for my plane.

Runway runs due North and South.

First try, I went around.
Second try, I was stepping on the rudder so hard that I shifted the seat back a notch. (I guess it wasn’t fully engaged, so slipped a cog.) I go around again,
Third try, If this doesn’t work, I know a nearby airport with runways that actually point into the wind, and this is absolutely my next destination.

However, the wind abates, and I make a smooth landing. Still, I have noticed out of the corner of my eye, a plane waiting to take off. They’ve been sitting there on all three of my approaches. Are they waiting to make sure I arrive safely, or was I just the crash test dummy that showed that they could safely take off?

Just because I can land when there is a lull in the wind doesn’t mean that you can take off safely.

However, if you sat there making sure I landed safely, thank you.
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Old 19th Feb 2022, 03:09
  #84 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by visibility3miles View Post
Decades ago, I was trying to land a small plane with around a 17 knot crosswind, give or take, which is the limit for my plane.

Runway runs due North and South.

First try, I went around.
Second try, I was stepping on the rudder so hard that I shifted the seat back a notch. (I guess it wasn’t fully engaged, so slipped a cog.) I go around again,
Third try, If this doesn’t work, I know a nearby airport with runways that actually point into the wind, and this is absolutely my next destination.

However, the wind abates, and I make a smooth landing. Still, I have noticed out of the corner of my eye, a plane waiting to take off. They’ve been sitting there on all three of my approaches. Are they waiting to make sure I arrive safely, or was I just the crash test dummy that showed that they could safely take off?

Just because I can land when there is a lull in the wind doesn’t mean that you can take off safely.

However, if you sat there making sure I landed safely, thank you.
Possibly beyond limits, or confidence levels maybe. I was behind a E190 once who wanted to wait a bit longer in challenging conditions, so it backtracked and repositioned back to the holding point while we got out. I always make a habit to make sure we communicate with other pilots in these sort of hairy situations. Most especially in non towered fields. The conditions I described to the E190 in the above example on climb out was enough for him to pull out and head back to the terminal. What my aircraft can handle isn’t the same for everyone else.

Don’t be afraid folks to ask the guy to girl in front about what they felt in the last few hundred ft. Saved me on many occasions, especially back in the piston days.

Last edited by PoppaJo; 19th Feb 2022 at 03:19.
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Old 19th Feb 2022, 06:19
  #85 (permalink)  
 
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TEMPO 1800/1813 7000 RA BKN010
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PROB30
TEMPO 1815/1824 3000 +SHRASN SHSN BKN005
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Never mind the pilots, Jerry withstood the whole TAF, on his own built scaffolding, for 8 hours of 27L adventures.

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Old 19th Feb 2022, 06:24
  #86 (permalink)  
 
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I find that chararcter Jerry Dyer who runs Big Jet TV extremly irritating. Most of his comments on everything are totally unecessary and insulting. He was interviewed on Sky and rambling on about pilots earning their money and referring to junior pilots as sproggs!! Yes there are some good shots but I mute the commentary.
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Old 19th Feb 2022, 07:38
  #87 (permalink)  
 
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Just watch with the sound turned off.
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Old 19th Feb 2022, 08:16
  #88 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by crewmeal View Post
I find that chararcter Jerry Dyer who runs Big Jet TV extremly irritating. Most of his comments on everything are totally unecessary and insulting. He was interviewed on Sky and rambling on about pilots earning their money and referring to junior pilots as sproggs!! Yes there are some good shots but I mute the commentary.

“Easy! Easy! Easy!”
“Tippy toes! Tippy toes!”
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Old 19th Feb 2022, 08:23
  #89 (permalink)  
 
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I wondered how safe it was to knowingly fly an airliner into extreme forecast weather ?

I am a 1200 hour ppl / ir so whilst not an airline pilot am reasonably knowledgable.

the aircraft has limits but given the scale of go arounds it would suggest that the cords wind was at / over the limit and the diversion options relatively limited given the scale of the weather system.

I am just curious as to the professionals point of view.
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Old 19th Feb 2022, 09:00
  #90 (permalink)  

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Big wind or dodgy weather days are just part and parcel of being a professional pilot. Rarely will I (we technically, it's a crew) say a flat out "no".
You plan for the worst and hope for the best. That is, there's enough fuel for a divert to an alternate that is acceptable. Training, experience, tiredness etc all come into play.
You brief before the flight so you're on the same page and revise as necessary during the flight. Ensure every one knows what will happen should a go-around need to occur.
Depending on the conditions, it'll be either an immediate divert or have another crack at it.
Different aircraft have different limits. It changes if the runway is wet etc.
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Old 19th Feb 2022, 10:05
  #91 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by redsnail View Post
Big wind or dodgy weather days are just part and parcel of being a professional pilot. Rarely will I (we technically, it's a crew) say a flat out "no".
You plan for the worst and hope for the best. That is, there's enough fuel for a divert to an alternate that is acceptable. Training, experience, tiredness etc all come into play.
You brief before the flight so you're on the same page and revise as necessary during the flight. Ensure every one knows what will happen should a go-around need to occur.
Depending on the conditions, it'll be either an immediate divert or have another crack at it.
Different aircraft have different limits. It changes if the runway is wet etc.
A man wiser and far more experienced than me used to add 10 tons of fuel for every extra line in the TAFF. Even the current Mrs Mogwi used to advise another 10 tons if the weather was at all scoushy. Seemed to work.

Mog
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Old 19th Feb 2022, 10:08
  #92 (permalink)  

Controversial, moi?
 
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Someone mentioned some airlines having a two go-around limit before diverting.

It may have changed but prior to my retirement in 2009 BA had a statement, to paraphrase, that said after two go-arounds serious consideration should be made before making a third landing attempt. I think the welfare of the hapless passengers having to endure what is usually a bumpy aproach for the third time might have been the reasoning.

The wording did at least give discretion to the crew.
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Old 19th Feb 2022, 10:46
  #93 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by crewmeal View Post
I find that chararcter Jerry Dyer who runs Big Jet TV extremly irritating. Most of his comments on everything are totally unecessary and insulting. He was interviewed on Sky and rambling on about pilots earning their money and referring to junior pilots as sproggs!! Yes there are some good shots but I mute the commentary.

Big Jet TV isn’t targeted at pilots or other aviation professionals to watch. It’s for your regular joe bloggs to have some entertainment.

In the same way I love watch the BBC drama “Line of Duty” but my friend who’s a sergeant in the police detests it.
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Old 19th Feb 2022, 11:03
  #94 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by jrudge View Post
I wondered how safe it was to knowingly fly an airliner into extreme forecast weather ?

I am a 1200 hour ppl / ir so whilst not an airline pilot am reasonably knowledgable.

the aircraft has limits but given the scale of go arounds it would suggest that the cords wind was at / over the limit and the diversion options relatively limited given the scale of the weather system.

I am just curious as to the professionals point of view.
Nothing wrong with dispatching towards the sort of weather that was forecast yesterday as long as you load enough fuel to keep options open and don’t actually land at a time the wind is actually out of limits.
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Old 19th Feb 2022, 11:04
  #95 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by DaveReidUK View Post
If they said three, BigJet can't count (no surprise there )

Two GAs (12:13 and 12:29), landed off the third approach at 12:59
My mistake. It must have been another airline 380 did a go-around about 12:45

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Old 19th Feb 2022, 11:06
  #96 (permalink)  
 
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On my jog today I passed a fallen sawn up tree now that's not unusual I'm sure but this one had fallen onto the boundary fence of a 440000v overhead pylon, the one at the end of the line where the power cones down to ground level.
I assumed they must have turned off the power so the Tree Surgeons could gain access into tbe compound and do their stuff...
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Old 19th Feb 2022, 11:11
  #97 (permalink)  
 
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I must say that I was impressed by the energetic rudder movements by most of the ones I saw. They looked like the best tail draggers.
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Old 19th Feb 2022, 11:12
  #98 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by TRENT210 View Post
Big Jet TV isn’t targeted at pilots or other aviation professionals to watch. It’s for your regular joe bloggs to have some entertainment.

In the same way I love watch the BBC drama “Line of Duty” but my friend who’s a sergeant in the police detests it.
Per the above, it’s harmless fun. I’m pretty sure there are a fair few industry professionals, including myself fleetingly have a watch every now and again. It’s attracting people to our industry in what has been a terrible 2 years for it.
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Old 19th Feb 2022, 11:19
  #99 (permalink)  
 
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I know some people doing him entertaining, and yes the “oohs” and “ash’s” and “big boy” comments get him likes, but I’m not sure calling co-pilot “sprogs”, claiming that as a spotter you can have done a better job at landing in yesterday’s conditions than pilots of X airline, or that pilots of Y airline always make hard landings create a great impression of the industry….

Still it’s all entertainment and of course who needs experts anyway .

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Old 19th Feb 2022, 11:29
  #100 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by M.Mouse View Post
Someone mentioned some airlines having a two go-around limit before diverting.

It may have changed but prior to my retirement in 2009 BA had a statement, to paraphrase, that said after two go-arounds serious consideration should be made before making a third landing attempt. I think the welfare of the hapless passengers having to endure what is usually a bumpy aproach for the third time might have been the reasoning.

The wording did at least give discretion to the crew.
The accident to BEA Vanguard G-APEE which crashed at Heathrow on 27-10-65 was attributed in part to crew fatigue and disorientation on a third approach after two go arounds. I'm sure I read somewhere that accident was a factor in guidance around 3rd approaches,
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