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This year's flu jab

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This year's flu jab

Old 17th Sep 2020, 16:10
  #41 (permalink)  
 
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VP959

It sounds pretty serious...


I think they gave you a "Man Flu" jab, we all know that is the worse type!

I've had the text, but wondering whether to go ahead with it.
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Old 17th Sep 2020, 16:36
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This has to be the most pointless post to this thread.
And that one even more so, then.
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Old 17th Sep 2020, 16:48
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Southern hemisphere has record low flu cases amid Covid lockdowns
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Old 17th Sep 2020, 19:09
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Anecdotally, I have only very recently encountered a couple of individuals who have a cold. Since March, I haven't encountered anyone who had a cold, the flu or hay fever. Perhaps everyone was too scared to be ill!?

I've been having the flu jab for the last 10 years and usually it's just a sore arm and feeling a bit off the day after. However last year it hit me really hard the next day, suddenly so afflicted that I had to hold on to a wall so as to walk 100m to get home. Bed for 2 days with fever and feeling like death. Then it was gone and I was ok again. On speaking with the GP they admitted that there had been a few with the same reaction and one very elderly lady was convince she was on her death bed. I'm hoping this year's variant won't be so dramatic!

I have to say VP959 that your eloquent prose didn't seem to suffer whilst you were feeling so rough. You must be made of strong stuff.
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Old 17th Sep 2020, 19:25
  #45 (permalink)  
 
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You did the right thing though when you were worried. You went and asked the bunch of self opinionated know it all, self righteous wankers on jetblast. Good move when you’re worried about your health.
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Old 17th Sep 2020, 19:28
  #46 (permalink)  
 
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The Economist has an interesting article about the flu season in the southern hemisphere. Basically it didn't happen as the corona virus counter measures stymied it.
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Old 18th Sep 2020, 17:19
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Been for our jabs today. Sign on front door to use the Fire Exit door and nurse behind screen in full PPE. Names given and passed to the other nurse. No chair arm out swabbed jabbed and wiped. Out the other fire exit and away 4 min max and screened off from the surgery waiting room with sick people. See what tonight's reaction might bring...
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Old 18th Sep 2020, 17:25
  #48 (permalink)  
 
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In my last year at work I was refused the flu jab as they only had the under 65 version. You would think something was better than nothing but rules are rules. I often feel a bit off for a couple of weeks after it but that might just be hypochondria.
But, it the effects of an illness are partially through the immune system response then isn't it a good thing if you feel off, and bad if you dont?
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Old 18th Sep 2020, 19:20
  #49 (permalink)  
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I plan to get a flu vaccine, but I'm holding off until October as my doctor told me it wears off after six months, and the flu could be going strong in February.

I get a flu shot every year, but one time I got a case of the flu that had me flat on my back for a week with a high temperature.

I do not want to risk getting the flu and Covid-19 at the same time.
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Old 19th Sep 2020, 10:35
  #50 (permalink)  
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Anecdotally, I have only very recently encountered a couple of individuals who have a cold. Since March, I haven't encountered anyone who had a cold, the flu or hay fever. Perhaps everyone was too scared to be ill!?
Same here - it's totally logical. The precautions against the corona virus will also work against ANY virus transmitted by the same vectors.
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Old 19th Sep 2020, 12:34
  #51 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by Kiltrash View Post
Been for our jabs today. Sign on front door to use the Fire Exit door and nurse behind screen in full PPE. Names given and passed to the other nurse. No chair arm out swabbed jabbed and wiped. Out the other fire exit and away 4 min max and screened off from the surgery waiting room with sick people. See what tonight's reaction might bring...
Sounds very like the system we had here, except they used the village hall. My wife was surprised when I came back so quickly, but it was as you say, in one door, temperature taken (with a remote thermometer) name checked on the list, directed to a mark on the floor, where a nurse gave the jab, then straight out the back door. Seemed a quick and safe process.

Originally Posted by Mr Optimistic View Post
But, it the effects of an illness are partially through the immune system response then isn't it a good thing if you feel off, and bad if you dont?
That would be my thinking to. If it's caused a reaction then I think that's probably a fair indicator that the immune system has been kick started.

Originally Posted by visibility3miles View Post
I plan to get a flu vaccine, but I'm holding off until October as my doctor told me it wears off after six months, and the flu could be going strong in February.
Seems to be sound advice. From what I've read, the flu vaccine barely lasts 6 months, and seems to start losing some effectiveness after around 3 to 4 months. Peak flu season here seems to be January/February, so holding off to October (if give the opportunity) seems a better bet. Here they are running vaccinations in batches, and they decided to do all the over-65s first. They aren't doing under-65s for another three weeks, apparently.
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Old 19th Sep 2020, 17:41
  #52 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by visibility3miles View Post
I plan to get a flu vaccine, but I'm holding off until October as my doctor told me it wears off after six months, and the flu could be going strong in February.

I get a flu shot every year, but one time I got a case of the flu that had me flat on my back for a week with a high temperature.

I do not want to risk getting the flu and Covid-19 at the same time.
That used to be my thinking too. Research seems to show the vaccine effectiveness waning after about 100 days. However, outbreaks in recent years seemed to peak around Christmas and New Year, and availability might be more of an issue this time.
This link is to the UK Flu Report from March and shows the timings.
https://assets.publishing.service.go...20_week_10.pdf
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Old 19th Sep 2020, 17:48
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You learn something new every day, despite hitting 50 I have never even heard of the "yearly flu jab" until I read this thread! I'd never even heard of a "flu jab" actually, seriously. Must have led a sheltered life.

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Old 19th Sep 2020, 17:57
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Originally Posted by flash8 View Post
You learn something new every day, despite hitting 50 I have never even heard of the "yearly flu jab" until I read this thread! I'd never even heard of a "flu jab" actually, seriously. Must have led a sheltered life.
Been pretty normal here for a few years now, for those over 65 and also those who may be more vulnerable. This year they are extending it so that pretty much anyone can have one if they wish.

Changing the subject slightly (well, back to the first post) I was talkign to my mother in law on the phone earlier. She had the jab last week, and felt very rough for around 24 hours afterwards, too. Her symptoms sounded much the same as mine, so I think it's likely that this year's version of the over-65's jab may be a bit more potent than we've had in the past.
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Old 19th Sep 2020, 22:59
  #55 (permalink)  
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Can it affect the brain?

I got up early and showered. I pulled up in the surgery car park and waited for a lull in the queue which was outside the front door. The lull came before my time of eleven hours plus minutes, zero-six and I was allowed in so that I was out before I should have been in. One's day had started well.

I drove to my bit of beach and started my hike. Each day, summer or brass-monkey's, I make it to the cliff slope and do press-ups and rowing on some railings that were made for the job. I hadn't been rowing long when I noticed a pain in my right arm. I happen to be left-handed. I did that sucking the shoulder-in thing that folks with dry bursa sack-thingies do to lubricate it. It didn't help. I was cross, I'd nursed this shoulder back to good fettle having tried to imitate a teenager once too often. (Weightlifting!) It hurt more the further I rowed.

It wasn't until afternoon tea, and a mention on the phone about my day, that I realised I'd been rowing with an arm full of vaccine. Nearly tomorrow and it's feeling like someone's punched it.

There are senior moments but, oh my . . .
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Old 19th Sep 2020, 23:15
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Originally Posted by flash8 View Post
You learn something new every day, despite hitting 50 I have never even heard of the "yearly flu jab" until I read this thread! I'd never even heard of a "flu jab" actually, seriously. Must have led a sheltered life.
Not sure where you live, but in the UK surely your parents will have talked about their flu jab?
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Old 20th Sep 2020, 01:47
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Well the wife and I got the flu shot yesterday. As I recently turned 65, I got both the 'extra strength' flu and the pneumonia shots. Aside from the typical sore shoulder and being perhaps a little more stiff and sore than normal, I'm feeling OK today.
Certainly not as bad as I'd feared.
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Old 20th Sep 2020, 09:01
  #58 (permalink)  
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From what I've read, the flu vaccine barely lasts 6 months, and seems to start losing some effectiveness after around 3 to 4 months.
According to my local retired drug pusher, who used to sell the stuff for the likes of GSK, the flu virus mutates at the speed where the vaccine issued after Christmas will be different to the vaccine issued before Christmas. I assume from this that the vaccine might last longer than a few months but will be ineffective against the newer strain.
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Old 20th Sep 2020, 09:16
  #59 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by UniFoxOs View Post
According to my local retired drug pusher, who used to sell the stuff for the likes of GSK, the flu virus mutates at the speed where the vaccine issued after Christmas will be different to the vaccine issued before Christmas. I assume from this that the vaccine might last longer than a few months but will be ineffective against the newer strain.
The process for producing the flu vaccine each year seems to be much the same globally, as far as I can tell. Around February each year, the WHO issues a list of the most likely strains of flu that it believes will be around for the coming flu season (the following winter). Each country selects the strains from that list that it believes are most likely to affect them, and starts producing a new vaccine. In the UK, the flu vaccine is usually based on four strains from the WHO list. Production and testing of the vaccine starts as soon as the formulation for the following season has been finalised, with the vaccine usually being available from around September/October onwards. There isn't normally a change in the flu season period, as it seems to take around 6 months to formulate, test and mass produce a new vaccine.
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Old 20th Sep 2020, 09:27
  #60 (permalink)  
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Had my flu jab yesterday at my local surgery. Car park had three cars in when I arrived, usually full. Met by car park attendant, directed to front door, two ladies guarding door, one lead me inside and took my name, then directed me to spot on floor in the waiting room in front of a table. Two nurses at table, one asked a few questions then gave me jab. Directed me to follow blue line to exit, passed another attendant on the way out. Only saw two other people, presumably there for their jabs as well.

So it took six people to administer as simple flu vaccine. I took it that the surgery was closed for anything else as there was no one at the normal reception desk and the flu vaccine jabs took place in the normal waiting area.

No wonder then that there is a massive train crash coming down the line, if the NHS (is there such a thing) is working like this. One thing at a time and massively over staffed.

No after affects after 24 hours, but then vaccinations have never seemed to affect me.
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