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Beer in hospitals

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Beer in hospitals

Old 19th Aug 2020, 02:14
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Beer in hospitals

A distant relative contacted me a while back regarding family history, and it set me off thinking about my Grandmother; she was in her late 70's, and got hit by a car on a Zebra crossing. Result? Broken pelvis, septicaemia, and a handful of other nasties thanks to the septicaemia. She was on her way out, didn't want to eat, if she did, it came back out the way it went in, she was just worn out. I was visiting one evening with my Mother, when the tea trolley arrived "Cup of tea or coffee Mrs. G?". Gran wasn't a boozer, but she said "No thanks love, but I'd like a bottle of Guinness."
The tea lady collared one of the nurses and relayed the conversation. The nurse then told my Mother it would be OK to nip across the road to the local pub and buy Gran a bottle of Guinness! So she did - Gran got about half of it down her then dozed off. The. Guinness stayed down, but she never properly woke up again until her days were done. Is it such a bad thing to make a bottle of beer or a glass of wine available in hospitals to those who are fading fast?
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Old 19th Aug 2020, 03:21
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When my mother was in a private hospital recovering from an operation, she was allowed a glass of wine with dinner.
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Old 19th Aug 2020, 04:16
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Post major surgery it was not unknown in one military hospital for a 26 oz bottle of full strength beer (before the days of light beers) to be provided each evening on prescription to promote appetite.
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Old 19th Aug 2020, 04:18
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 When my mother was in a retirement home, they were allowed a glass of sherry in the evenings. Old folks with alcohol can get out of control.
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Old 19th Aug 2020, 06:48
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1977 in the Maternity Unit in Wegberg, my wife waiting birth of our daughter. The patients were all allowed one glass of stout from the ward fridge each night. It being Germany, Guinness was not easily available so in good RAF tradition an ‘in lieu’ item was issued - Heineken.
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Old 19th Aug 2020, 06:56
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When I was in med school in the '60's (18, or 19, I forget) I spent a few weeks at a large Veterans Admin hospital. Large inpatient population back then. But the old guys were entitled to a beer each evening. A "shorty", as it was about a 7 ounce bottle.

But woe be unto anyone interfering with a patient's "shorty", or deciding it was forbidden on medical grounds.

(Not all the beer was consumed by the patients, either.)
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Old 19th Aug 2020, 09:02
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They were still handing out bottles of Mackeson milk stout when I was in hospital with a few broken bones about 45 years ago. Mackeson used to play on this in their advertising, with the slogan "looks good, tastes good and, by golly, it does you good."
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Old 19th Aug 2020, 09:15
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The King Edward VII hospital in Marylebone has a wine list.
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Old 19th Aug 2020, 09:24
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Would have to be Heineken, as it reaches the parts other beers cannot.....
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Old 19th Aug 2020, 09:56
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RA F Wroughton, 1968. Can of beer handed out, every evening, to all in ward 10. Not a beer drinker, I handed mine over, every evening to a serious embiber who was immobile and had a , sort of, tent thingy over his legs. Inside the tent was a stash of beer from other contributors too. Marve sound as , at regular intervals throughout the night, a ping, pkflush, glug glug and dreadful beerie burp .
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Old 19th Aug 2020, 09:59
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Back in the 80s the Coombe Hospital (one of the main public maternity hospitals in Dublin) provided a daily free bottle of Guinness to all new mothers. Nowadays bottle feeding for mothers or babies is not looked on so favourably by our puritan overlords.
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Old 19th Aug 2020, 10:16
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In 1982, I was in hospital in the UK for most of December and the first week of January the next year and on Christmas day when dinner was dished out, the nurses came around with the medication trolley loaded up with tins of beer. Each patient was given 2 tins each provided that they weren't on medication that prevented this.
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Old 19th Aug 2020, 10:27
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I was visiting a friend spending his last days in a Macmillan unit when someone came to take his order for dinner. He was offered a range of alcoholic aperitifs.
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Old 19th Aug 2020, 10:31
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Ahh! Hospital Porters....
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Old 19th Aug 2020, 10:37
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Originally Posted by VP959 View Post
They were still handing out bottles of Mackeson milk stout when I was in hospital with a few broken bones about 45 years ago. Mackeson used to play on this in their advertising, with the slogan "looks good, tastes good and, by golly, it does you good."
That brings back memories. Supposed to contain iron and be good for anaemia wasn't it?
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Old 19th Aug 2020, 10:38
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I spent two months in the Cambridge Military Hospital., Aldershot, and after dinner had been cleared away each night the duty Matron came around with a trolley loaded with beer, we were allowed one each in our 2 bed "ward".

My recent RAF colleagues visited one day, and brought me a bottle of lemon squash. Upon departure they said " keep shaking it". I woke up in the middle of the night to find that half of it was neat Gin, which had separated from the squash !. I kept shaking. ( the bottle, that is ) Nobody noticed and I soon polished it off !
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Old 19th Aug 2020, 11:15
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I recall a number of stays in RAF Halton Hospital in the 60s. Each day one of the walking wounded would have to take the ward trolly to the catering store and draw beer for each individual who was allowed to drink it. The choices was Light Ale, Brown Ale or Guinness. The first time I enjoyed the daily ration I was on 14. There was never any shortage as far as I can remember.

Aaron.
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Old 19th Aug 2020, 11:23
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We were in a very similar position to the O/P when my Dad was in his final days - hospital were happy for him to have "a proper drink, rather than that muck they serve". Of course he could only manage a couple of mouthfulls but he enjoyed it, and he was past it doing him any harm.
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Old 19th Aug 2020, 11:38
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Originally Posted by Mr Optimistic View Post
That brings back memories. Supposed to contain iron and be good for anaemia wasn't it?
Just checked on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mackeson_Stout

It seems it was supposed to be good for nursing mothers, so not sure why they handed it out in an orthopaedic ward! A bottle and glass were handed out with the evening medicine round, IIRC.
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Old 19th Aug 2020, 12:20
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VP959
My Mum was a Midwife and Mackeson was definitely on Wards in the 50,and 60,s. She did not practice while we were in Chile, but returned to NHS upon our return to UK and Stout was still in use. I remember commenting on it while going to see her for some reason and chatting up a cute Nurse at a nursing station and watched this crate of the stuff going by and this would be early 80,s. With regards to the serving of alcohol to patients in the last stages of life I believe it was quite widespread, and indeed there was a drug cocktail which my Mum used to refer to as a "Micky Fin" which was also used to give respite and to ease people's pain at the end of life time. I am not sure that would be allowed now.
Regards
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