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Not bad for a 14 year old

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Not bad for a 14 year old

Old 28th Jun 2020, 21:56
  #1 (permalink)  
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Not bad for a 14 year old

Congratulations on winning $25 K young lady, one hope something similar makes it into production vehicles



https://www.ctvnews.ca/mobile/sci-tech/teen-wins-us-25-000-award-for-invention-eliminating-blind-spots-for-cars-1.4673098?cache=yesclipId104062?clipId=104070/title/Teen%20wins%20US$25,000%20award%20for%20invention%20eliminat ing%20blind%20spots%20for%20cars
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Old 29th Jun 2020, 06:10
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Brilliant invention, well done that young lady. Now we can make cars much cheaper by having no windows at all, and complete 360 degree vision.
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Old 29th Jun 2020, 08:38
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Unfortunate lack of soundtrack, but, presumably, there is a camera/projector interface involved there. As someone who has a permanent painful neck movement requiring a restrictive collar for daily use, I use the simpleton solution - manoeuvre such that I can see past the pillars, A and B frame. Seems to work satisfactorily so far.
To forestall the 'bleeding obvious' jokesters rush, Yes., it does mean I can be classed as a 'pain in the neck' ... boom-boom!
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Old 29th Jun 2020, 08:55
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Neat idea. Some cars now come with a situational awareness display, giving a ~360 view of everything around the car, using a mix of cameras, radar and ultrasonic short distance sensing. Mine has this displayed right under the speedometer display, and after a while it becomes second nature to just glance down at it to see what's around. Probably the most useful blind spot aid this provides is the rear quarter view, where being able to see clearly vehicles coming up from behind and to the sides seems to be much more effective that just glancing at wing mirrors.

Given the way that newer cars seems to be equipped with more and more cameras and other sensors, I'd guess that it won't be long until they become mainstream. Mine has 8 cameras scattered around the car, giving full 360 coverage, with most of them just feeding video to the main computer, that they uses visual recognition techniques to classify objects around the car. It seems to be pretty accurate, probably more accurate than my Mk1 eyeballs at times, probably because, unlike human eyes, cameras have pretty much the same resolution and motion sensitivity over their entire field of view.
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Old 29th Jun 2020, 09:45
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Once they become mainstream in cars can we hope to have them in aircraft (in about 50 years after all the certification)? There is a rule that the constant sightline angle of the other aircraft on collision course always seems to be behind the pillar. Similarly in tower VCRs the aircraft/vehicle you're trying to see always manages to hide behind a pillar.
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Old 29th Jun 2020, 10:33
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Neat idea. Some cars now come with a situational awareness display, giving a ~360 view of everything around the car, using a mix of cameras, radar and ultrasonic short distance sensing.
Hmm! Idea?, maybe, practical?, distinctly dubious, I would suggest. Standard fit at the present is the rear-view mirror. Demonstrably, both by observation and accident statistics, a large proportion of road users fail to use it (other than for make-up repairs). Adding yet another 'toy' to the mix is likely to prove to be more distraction to accompany the I.C.E. The thought of more of my fellow motorists gazing at, no doubt fascinating, surroundings, fills me with dread. Close to 70 years of accident free driving, all over the world, reliant on stardard glazing and a rear view mirror has, so far, served me well. I try to reserve 'toys' for my workshop!

D D - might well be the pillars but an examination of the human ocular structure indicates the naturally occuring 'blind-spot'. Keep your head moving all the time! Silk scarves help!
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Old 29th Jun 2020, 10:55
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Originally Posted by Cornish Jack View Post
Neat idea. Some cars now come with a situational awareness display, giving a ~360 view of everything around the car, using a mix of cameras, radar and ultrasonic short distance sensing.
Hmm! Idea?, maybe, practical?, distinctly dubious, I would suggest. Standard fit at the present is the rear-view mirror. Demonstrably, both by observation and accident statistics, a large proportion of road users fail to use it (other than for make-up repairs). Adding yet another 'toy' to the mix is likely to prove to be more distraction to accompany the I.C.E. The thought of more of my fellow motorists gazing at, no doubt fascinating, surroundings, fills me with dread. Close to 70 years of accident free driving, all over the world, reliant on stardard glazing and a rear view mirror has, so far, served me well. I try to reserve 'toys' for my workshop!

All I can say is that it works extremely well, and definitely enhances situational awareness. It clearly doesn't remove the need to maintain a good look out, but having a display, that can be seen with a flick of the eyeballs, showing the car, with everything around categorised and displayed with regard to position, distance and object category does make life safer.

Also, because the car is able to "see" and categorise objects around the car all the time, and take appropriate emergency action to avoid an accident (it will actively steer away or emergency brake if needed) this adds another layer of safety. Unlike humans, the sensors and computers don't suffer from any momentary lapse in attention, as well as being able to see all around the car all the time.

There are now millions of cars on the road with systems like this, so it's rapidly becoming pretty normal. The ability of the car to "see" and categorise objects all around is partially shown in this video, which gives a "computer's eye view" of just the main forward looking sensors identifying and categorising objects around the car (the car does much the same with the side and rear view sensors, and this is NOT the display the driver sees):

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Old 29th Jun 2020, 11:09
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VP - I'm sure you highly value your 'toys'. You obviously feel that they fulfill some need in your 'box of driving skills'. The published record of Tesla's (as well as others) operation does not inspire me with confidence, nor an overwhelming 'must-have' desire. I have to admit to adopting auto gearboxes as the essential of today's driving (having been brought up on crash boxes and an opinion that synchromesh was a bit 'sissy'), but I have grown up and 'the latest gadget' doesn't appeal much any more.
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Old 29th Jun 2020, 11:16
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What appeals to me most about this technology is that you can "blind spot" out any annoying passenger. The rest is handled by the radio volume control.

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Old 29th Jun 2020, 11:39
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Annoying passenger ? Much better way to deal with them :

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Old 29th Jun 2020, 11:40
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Ejector seat? You're joking!
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Old 29th Jun 2020, 15:47
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Another useful gadget for driving in suburban areas with varying speed limits would be an auto speed limiter (fuel flow restrictor) signalled by the GPS. Switch it on for convenience or off if not required or in case of malfunction.
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Old 29th Jun 2020, 16:53
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What always makes me dubious is the reliability aspect and what are you left with when it breaks down? Car electronics is pretty good from a reliability viewpoint but the more components you have, the greater the chance of a failure, especially when there's major price pressure on a supplier. The place where I worked made components for TV and automobile applications as well as professional, aerospace and military. TV and automobile pricing made practically no profit, but paid the overheads of everything else. Space and medical had very high overheads because of the QC requirements. An example is medical implants - the crystal for the pacemaker telemetry radio was $15 in medical grade and for the same quantity in consumer/automobile applications was 20 cents. The telemetry radio was not critical for the pacemaker to do its job.....
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Old 29th Jun 2020, 17:18
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Originally Posted by Discorde View Post
Another useful gadget for driving in suburban areas with varying speed limits would be an auto speed limiter (fuel flow restrictor) signalled by the GPS. Switch it on for convenience or off if not required or in case of malfunction.
This is already available, via adaptive cruise control in various guises. Quite a few cars now have radar/lidar sensors that allow them to adjust the vehicle speed to maintain a safe distance from the car in front, and quite a few use GPS speed, plus mapping, to also adjust for speed limits. The next iteration of the Tesla software should have the the ability to read speed limit signs, so giving a more accurate speed limit boundary than given by mapping and GPS. Most cars are now "drive by wire" as far as speed control is concerned, as cable-operated throttle pedals are pretty much extinct now, I think (all the cars I've owned over the past fifteen years have been effectively "drive by wire").

Originally Posted by radeng View Post
What always makes me dubious is the reliability aspect and what are you left with when it breaks down? Car electronics is pretty good from a reliability viewpoint but the more components you have, the greater the chance of a failure, especially when there's major price pressure on a supplier. The place where I worked made components for TV and automobile applications as well as professional, aerospace and military. TV and automobile pricing made practically no profit, but paid the overheads of everything else. Space and medical had very high overheads because of the QC requirements. An example is medical implants - the crystal for the pacemaker telemetry radio was $15 in medical grade and for the same quantity in consumer/automobile applications was 20 cents. The telemetry radio was not critical for the pacemaker to do its job.....
Not sure about other manufacturers, but I did look closely at the way Toyota handled all the "drive by wire" stuff in the Prius, years ago. Toyota documented their approach at the time, and it struck me as being pretty solid. Instead of one central control system, they divided all the functionality up into separate, almost stand alone, fail safe modules. So, although the steering was largely "drive by wire" (albeit with a fall-back straight through linkage), the steering CPU only looked after steering, nothing else. It just had a CANBUS connection to the car, with only a limited sub-set of instructions, to accept things like a speed input (to control weighting) and the park assist steering commands. The same went for everything else, there were CPUs liberally scattered around the car, with each having just a single task. Testing for safety was made a great deal easier, as the hardware and code in each CPU was relatively simple, and the small number of effective I/Os for each CPU meant that in-depth 100% testing was a realistic proposition.

This is in stark contrast to a Rolls Royce/Honeywell FADEC unit that I had the misfortune to be peripherally involved with the procurement of years ago. That had code that no one knew where it had all come from, as they'd taken modules from previous (undocumented!) versions and just mashed the lot together until it worked. When asked if they could certify that the code was safe (to UK requirements) the answer was no. They'd written the code in C++, and then used three different un-certified compilers. They seemed a bit upset when we asked if they could re-write the code in ADA, so it would have some chance of meeting UK military airworthiness requirements.

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Old 29th Jun 2020, 17:37
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Originally Posted by Discorde View Post
Another useful gadget for driving in suburban areas with varying speed limits would be an auto speed limiter (fuel flow restrictor) signalled by the GPS. Switch it on for convenience or off if not required or in case of malfunction.
Very dangerous if it inhibits passing performance.
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Old 29th Jun 2020, 18:11
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Originally Posted by MarcK View Post
Very dangerous if it inhibits passing performance.
No problem, as with adaptive cruise control, floor it and off you go.
Power output may vary.
Per
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Old 29th Jun 2020, 19:49
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Originally Posted by Cornish Jack View Post
VP - I'm sure you highly value your 'toys'. You obviously feel that they fulfill some need in your 'box of driving skills'. The published record of Tesla's (as well as others) operation does not inspire me with confidence, nor an overwhelming 'must-have' desire. I have to admit to adopting auto gearboxes as the essential of today's driving (having been brought up on crash boxes and an opinion that synchromesh was a bit 'sissy'), but I have grown up and 'the latest gadget' doesn't appeal much any more.
For what it its worth I,for one, place more store in the opinion of someone who has actually experienced using technology than that of someone who displays, on appearances, a Luddite like aversion.
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Old 29th Jun 2020, 20:11
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VP, the Toyota has sign recognition now. Problem in this area is overgrown hiding the signs. The sign might stand on Highways ground but vegetation from adjacent land masks them. Highways say no problem and letters to the landowners are often ignored.

The other problem with the Toyota speed application, it tends to overread by 3mph (safe) rather than using Satnav speed.

My car has pretty much all round sensor though not, for some reason, blind quarter cover. I have no issue with its collision avoidance. The only things I am not entirely happy with is the rear view camera system.

It works but I have yet to get in the habit of using it. It is essentially a head down display whereas the mirrors allow me to check the front as well. I have the nightmare of the front end sideswiping something. I did that once, I wax checking my 5 o'clock and swiped a pillar at my 10.

Last edited by Pontius Navigator; 29th Jun 2020 at 20:23.
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Old 29th Jun 2020, 20:57
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Mk1 eyeball, situational awareness, driving within limits and conditions, keeping distance. I prefer to drive the car and not rely on gadgets that drive it for me or could distract me to press the right button.
A good parking sensor is a towbar which automatically tells me if I've hit the car behind.
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Old 29th Jun 2020, 21:29
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Ejector seat? You're joking!
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