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Electric scooters.

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Electric scooters.

Old 16th May 2020, 09:09
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Ecce Homo! Loquitur...
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Electric scooters.

With the government stating they are planning to start trials with electric scooters I am looking at buying one.

There are plenty here in Brighton and the police take no notice. I did look at a bike, but living on the top floor of a building with a two person lift it wasn’t practicable. A folding scooter would allow me to travel the few miles along the cliff underpass avoiding the main road to meet my sisters outside for a chat and coffee whilst avoiding using the buses.

Brighton is also in the middle of planning a large expansion of bike lanes as well, which would it feasible to travel into the town centre.

Anyone admit to having one and any recommendations? Currently leaning towards the Xiaomi M365 Pro.

https://www.t3.com/features/best-electric-scooters


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Old 16th May 2020, 09:45
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Arenít they illegal to use on public land?
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Old 16th May 2020, 09:51
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Originally Posted by ShyTorque View Post
Arenít they illegal to use on public land?
I suspect they are but there's not enough Police to enforce it, or people just don't give a monkeys. Saw a young rich kid go past on one yesterday.
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Old 16th May 2020, 09:58
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Saw a guy belting down the main road outside my house on an electric unicycle not long ago - how the **** does he do an emergency stop? He must have been doing as near as dammit 30mph, faster than I'd be able to ride a pushbike on that stretch.
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Old 16th May 2020, 09:59
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I believe that they are illegal to use on public roads (being seen as a motorised vehicle they would require registration/tax and so on) and also illegal to use on footpaths.

Expensive white elephant if the police do decide to enforce.

I bought a manually propelled scooter for about 60 quid a while back, specifically so I could travel to and from work from the garage when my car is being serviced. I think that even the manually propelled scooters are illegal.on footpaths though.
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Old 16th May 2020, 10:07
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I’ll repeat my first statement - the government is to start trials prior to legalising their use. They are already selling out fast.

https://www.businessinsider.com/uk-a...ovid-19-2020-5

https://www.bmmagazine.co.uk/news/el...se-congestion/

https://www.cnbc.com/2020/05/15/bird...er-trials.html
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Old 16th May 2020, 10:08
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Originally Posted by 'Chuffer' Dandridge View Post
I suspect they are but there's not enough Police to enforce it, or people just don't give a monkeys. Saw a young rich kid go past on one yesterday.
The biggest problem might not be police enforcement but the results of getting into an accident.

if someone is riding one of these on the road or pavement and is involved in an accident in which someone gets injured, not only could they get prosecuted, the injured party could well take legal action against the rider, something that could have severe financial consequences.
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Old 16th May 2020, 10:11
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Around here there were a few complaints from pedestrians having unpleasant encounters with them, and from those riding electric skateboards, on footpaths and pavements a year or two ago. The advice received then was that they were illegal to use on any public right of way; they can only be used on private land, in effect.

Clearly they present a significant risk to pedestrians if they are used on footpaths and pavements, due to their relatively high speed, limited manoeuvrability and inherently poor braking systems. For those less mobile, or partially sighted, these things are probably a particular nuisance.

I can't really see any issue with them being used on roads or designated cycle paths, though, and I suspect that the law may well be relaxed to allow this sort of use before too long, especially given the drive to try and get people away from using cars in urban areas. In terms of making best use of cycle path space, it could be argued that small electric scooters and electric skateboards might be better than bikes (although as a cyclist I'd take issue with that).
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Old 16th May 2020, 10:34
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Proper electric scooters, the size of Lambrettas and Vespas, have been in use in China for nearly twenty years. A damned nuisance at first because people would ride them on pavements and being silent one couldn't hear them coming behind you. New road building schemes allowed for these with tracks by the footpath. Last time |I was there in 2014 one cost the equivalent of £250 in a supermarket.

Travelling regularly I was tempted to bring one back to the UK in bits but knowing about batteries as dangerous cargo I forgot that idea plus I was certain that it would have to be registered and not being on the list of approved vehicles that would be impossible.

There are dirt cheap to run. They used to have a top speed of 40 kph and a similar range. With modern batteries the range should be well past that.
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Old 16th May 2020, 11:17
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They do need legislation and quickly. The wife of a colleague was hit by a kid (<16) on one on a pedestrian precinct and spent three months horizontal with a compound hip fracture. Kid disappeared. I was nearly hit by a guy on a side street in London, must have been doing 20 mph and he re-appeared every night doing the same speed. No helmet, dodgy brakes, no road sense.

They are a great method of short distance transport but the riders need to have a motorbike license or similar. And whilst we are at it, as they are such electric wizz machines, lets put a speed tracker in them by law...
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Old 16th May 2020, 12:42
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Registration and third party insurance should be a requisite.
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Old 16th May 2020, 12:51
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Originally Posted by Sallyann1234 View Post
Registration and third party insurance should be a requisite.
As ought to be the cases for pedal cycles, whether they are to be used on the public road or the pavement (or sidewalk!).
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Old 16th May 2020, 13:44
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Originally Posted by ATNotts View Post
As ought to be the cases for pedal cycles, whether they are to be used on the public road or the pavement (or sidewalk!).
But you ARE insured in any case??? Inside your house or in the street, any public place, yourself, your wife or any of your children or even your dog or cat (your household) are under your home insurance policy (compulsory). I sat on my friends reading glasses once, he got a new pair from my home owner's insurance!!! If you run into somebody while riding your bike, at home or on the road, any damage will be covered by your civil liability policy which is automatiquely attached to your home policy......
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Old 16th May 2020, 13:49
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Originally Posted by alicopter View Post
But you are insured in any case?? Yourself, your wife or any of your children or your dog (your household) are under your home insurance policy (compulsory). I sat on my friends reading glasses once, he got a new pair from my home owner's insurance!!! If you run into somebody while riding your bike, at home or on the road, any damage will be covered by your civil liability policy whic is attached to your home policy......
That I hadn't realised! Even so, in these litigious times I'd have thought that to keep home insurance costs down it might be beneficial to have the option to remove that cover and then cover cyclists under a separate policy. Were I to have a family member who rode their bike for commuting into London, or any other big city I would have thought that my home insurers might want to know about that, and bump up premiums accordingly. If they don't then I'd suggest they're missing a trick.
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Old 16th May 2020, 13:49
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how the **** does he do an emergency stop?
Three possible ways:
1. Splat.
2. Thud.
3. Boing, boing, boing.

For that very reason the second hand market is flooded with scooters.

We have the same kind of lobbyists here who are demanding the building of scooter trails or relaxing the laws on riding on the footpaths - driven by self interest of course by the typical hipster crowd.

Now you could buy yourself a segway...I haven't seen one of them for years, possibly the best bargain on flea bay.

I was looking into buying an e-scooter six months ago when the railways were out for weeks for major maintenance which would have allowed me to park a few km outside the city and scoot in on the bicycle tracks. But it really would have been impractical as these scooters have very small wheels and flip over quite easily. A better option in this situation would have been to buy a fold up bicycle that fits in the boot. For now I use the feet (2 x 25 minute enjoyable walks) for the few days I'm not working from home during the pandemic.

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Old 16th May 2020, 14:15
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Originally Posted by ATNotts View Post
That I hadn't realised! Even so, in these litigious times I'd have thought that to keep home insurance costs down it might be beneficial to have the option to remove that cover and then cover cyclists under a separate policy. Were I to have a family member who rode their bike for commuting into London, or any other big city I would have thought that my home insurers might want to know about that, and bump up premiums accordingly. If they don't then I'd suggest they're missing a trick.
Nobody is keeping you from subscribing a "cyclist" insurance with your Sport Federation (Road, Off road, Touring etc...) When I go dinguy sailing, I am covered by a specific Sailing policy, horse riding ditto.... interestingly, sailing cruisers, insurance is not compulsory (but marinas won't let you stay if you are not)...
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Old 16th May 2020, 14:22
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I recall someone "famous" was killed on an electric scooter in Battersea last year and the owner of Segway rode his off road version over a cliff on his own estate with fatal consequences!

I stopped cycling 18 months ago due to neck problems but as I've forgotten to cancel my cycle insurance (through membership of Cycling UK) I will probably will put the old war horse back together, oil its most tender parts and go and play with the traffic. I'm sure the sudden worsening of my asthma is because I stopped.
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Old 16th May 2020, 14:40
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Not everyone has home insurance. It is not compulsory, for example, if you rent a property rather than owning it or having a mortgage on one.
Sensible to have contents insurance, but not compulsory. I would imagine that quite a few people, particularly those renting small flats, houses and bedsits, wouldn't have home insurance.
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Old 16th May 2020, 14:48
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If many more of these nasty gadgets appear, my trusty walking stick will have to re-emerge.

Its last outing was when our village had an infection of electric wheel chairs. Fortunately, there are none around currently.
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Old 16th May 2020, 14:50
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Originally Posted by treadigraph View Post

I stopped cycling 18 months ago due to neck problems but as I've forgotten to cancel my cycle insurance (through membership of Cycling UK) I will probably will put the old war horse back together, oil its most tender parts and go and play with the traffic. I'm sure the sudden worsening of my asthma is because I stopped.
If you have neck problems, the worst thing you can do is to stop cycling.... I do not know if they still do it after their recent "troubles" but Evans (in some branches... and by the way, not a share holder) used to have an employee with Physio knowledge who could help you find the right riding position... Sometimes, a half centimetre in height or translation can make all the difference. May be your NHS physio could help if you ask nicely... A nice saddle like B17 Brooks is of great help (beware it only fits your bum after many miles/months and is not maintenance free) Enjoy....
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