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Oceans and war and films and books

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Oceans and war and films and books

Old 14th May 2020, 12:43
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by 57mm View Post
HMS Ulysses - Alistair MacLean
Truly fantastic book. Only time I have ever finished a book and immediately started again.

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Old 14th May 2020, 14:32
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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More grist for the mill at https://www.telegraph.co.uk/films/0/...aign=DM1246462

I'm probably - and perhaps inevitably - biased in favour of "The Cruel Sea" as the front runner, but would certainly support many other of Simon Heffer's recommendations, particularly the original "Dunkirk".

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Old 14th May 2020, 14:37
  #23 (permalink)  
 
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I'll put in a plea for "The Long Fight" by D.A. Rayner. Based on a true event.
And, if you can find a copy, "The Wreck of The Maid of Athens." The diary of the captain's wife.
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Old 14th May 2020, 14:47
  #24 (permalink)  
 
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And for something very different, try the movie "Windjammer".
Very uplifting, very sunny, very fifties and some good songs.
Per
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Old 14th May 2020, 14:52
  #25 (permalink)  
 
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double_barrel
[QUOTE But I always think that the story of Shackleton's 1914-16 Antarctic expedition is one of the most astonishing tales of skill, bravery and leadership at sea. I have never seen a decent film covering this, surely something has been done ?[/QUOTE]

Shackleton is definitely a hero of mine. The drama documentary from 2002 which covers this epic expedition is well worth a watch. https://www.channel4.com/programmes/shackleton
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Old 14th May 2020, 18:25
  #26 (permalink)  
 
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Snorkers - Good Oh!
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Old 14th May 2020, 18:40
  #27 (permalink)  
 
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"The Cruel Sea" of course. I've just re-discovered it. Besides being a great story it is very well written.

Also, a very different sort of book, and a fascinating read, R V Jones "Most Secret War".
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Old 14th May 2020, 19:16
  #28 (permalink)  
 
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This is pretty good----also a movie and based on true story.


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Old 14th May 2020, 20:27
  #29 (permalink)  
 
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Re Coronel and the Falklands as mentioned by Union Jack above. There is an excellent book of the same name by Geoffrey Bennett, who also wrote one about Jutland.
Captain John Luce who commanded HMS Glasgow at Coronel and the Falklands was the great grandfather of comedian Miranda Hart.
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Old 15th May 2020, 00:07
  #30 (permalink)  
 
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Of course,The Cruel Sea,both the book and film and The Caine Mutiny,which is superb!
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Old 15th May 2020, 00:37
  #31 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by Bergerie1 View Post
Wingnuts,

This is the flim:- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9tuTKhqWZso
Wow! That is downright awe inspiring. Brave is not a sufficient word to describe those gents.

Did they plan on losing X number of crew per voyage? Was it part of normal attrition?
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Old 15th May 2020, 04:32
  #32 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Bergerie1 View Post
Wingnuts,

This is the flim:- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9tuTKhqWZso
Yes, that's it.
Thank you very much for that.
Let's see Humphrey Bogart do that!!!

Once seen, never forgotten.

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Old 15th May 2020, 05:45
  #33 (permalink)  
 
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Uncle Fred and Wingnuts,

Yes it most certainly was brave, but it was not unusual in those days. If you read about some of the great sea voyages of those times, and before, you will see that such things were expected from time to time, it was part of being a sailor - one hand for the ship and one for yourself. Even in modern times it can be quite dramatic, here is a short video of a more modern ship, the Europa, in the Drake Passage.


On 13 January 1833, HMS Beagle, under the command of Captain Robert Fitzroy was laid flat sixty miles WSW of Cape Horn. On board was Charles Darwin. Fitzroy, in his journal wrote, "I was anxiously watching the successive waves, when three huge rollers approached, whose size and steepness at once told me that our sea-boat, as good as she was, would be sorely tried. Having steerage way, the vessel met and rose over the first unharmed, but of course, her way was checked; the second deadened her way completely, throwing her off the wind; and the third great sea, taking her right abeam, turned her so far over, that all the lee bulwarks, from cat-head to the stern davit, was two or three feet under water.

For a moment, our position was critical; but like a cask, she rolled back again, though with some feet of water over the whole deck. Had another sea struck her, the little ship might have numbered among the many of her class which have disappeared....."


Had that happened, Darwin would not have written On the Origin of Species and Fitzroy would not have become 'the father' of Britain's Met Office.

It was a near run thing!
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Old 15th May 2020, 23:28
  #34 (permalink)  
 
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The Grey Seas Under by Farley Mowat the story of a ocean-going salvage tug,1930-1948
Think what you want of him the man could spin a yarn and was a warrior with conviction

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Old 16th May 2020, 01:24
  #35 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Bergerie1 View Post
Uncle Fred and Wingnuts,

Yes it most certainly was brave, but it was not unusual in those days. If you read about some of the great sea voyages of those times, and before, you will see that such things were expected from time to time, it was part of being a sailor - one hand for the ship and one for yourself. Even in modern times it can be quite dramatic, here is a short video of a more modern ship, the Europa, in the Drake Passage.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=08EeAvMUCe0&t=3s

On 13 January 1833, HMS Beagle, under the command of Captain Robert Fitzroy was laid flat sixty miles WSW of Cape Horn. On board was Charles Darwin. Fitzroy, in his journal wrote, "I was anxiously watching the successive waves, when three huge rollers approached, whose size and steepness at once told me that our sea-boat, as good as she was, would be sorely tried. Having steerage way, the vessel met and rose over the first unharmed, but of course, her way was checked; the second deadened her way completely, throwing her off the wind; and the third great sea, taking her right abeam, turned her so far over, that all the lee bulwarks, from cat-head to the stern davit, was two or three feet under water.

For a moment, our position was critical; but like a cask, she rolled back again, though with some feet of water over the whole deck. Had another sea struck her, the little ship might have numbered among the many of her class which have disappeared....."


Had that happened, Darwin would not have written On the Origin of Species and Fitzroy would not have become 'the father' of Britain's Met Office.

It was a near run thing!
That'a a great video.
Amazing how a couple of tons of seawater can slosh onto the deck and then vanish through the scuppers on the next roll...
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Old 16th May 2020, 03:45
  #36 (permalink)  
 
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Just gonna say, again, that A Bloody War is an outstanding book about fighting subs in the Atlantic.
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Old 16th May 2020, 09:48
  #37 (permalink)  
 
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A book I enjoyed reading many years ago was "Very Ordinary Seaman" by JPW Mallalieu. It tells the story of the initial recruitment, training and subsequent posting to a convoy escort destroyer of a seaman in the RN during WW2. It culminates in a surface battle during an Arctic convoy. It gets good reviews from those who have actually served as ratings in the RN.
Probably out of print now, but you may find a copy in a 2nd hand bookshop or online.
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Old 16th May 2020, 10:09
  #38 (permalink)  
 
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I'll throw in The Yangtzee Incident..just for a laugh.
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Old 16th May 2020, 10:58
  #39 (permalink)  
 
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Gift Horse (1952) (AKA Glory at Sea) - An old WW1 4 Pipe Destroyer is transferred to the Royal Navy and renamed HMS Ballantrae - she has a mostly inexperienced crew - the film starts in 1940 and ends with the raid on occupied St Nazaire in 1942. Trevor Howard plays Lt Cmdr Hugh Fraser, the newly appointed captain, back in service after having been 'on the beach' following a court martial in 1932.
Quite an enjoyable film - a few laughs on the way,the second half of the film obviously based on HMS Campbeltown.

Trevor Howard,Richard Attenborough,James Donald,Sonny Tufts,Bernard Lee.
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Old 16th May 2020, 13:51
  #40 (permalink)  
 
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Richard Dana's Two Years Before the Mast is a gripping mid-19th century story of a landlubber going to sea on a brigantine if you like a good seafaring memoir. Superb descriptions of life below decks, raging storms, scurvy, a brutal captain and a chapter in which an infected tooth kept him in agony and unable to carry out crew duties for several days. A genuine classic.
I had all of Tristan Jones' sailing books at one time but gave them away when they were proved to be largely fiction after his death. It was very disappointing because he was a very good writer and his accounts were engrossing even if I was a little suspicious about one or two events. They're probably worth reading as works of fiction based on fact for all that. The magic's gone for me though.
Morning Departure is another gem. A typically British film about a submarine trapped on the seabed after an explosion and the air running out after the remaining crew can't be rescued because of bad weather. The usual cast of the time and the usual good acting.

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