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Blood donation

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Blood donation

Old 27th Mar 2020, 12:36
  #21 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: not scotland
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Originally Posted by Toadstool View Post
I registered yesterday.

Giving blood today.

I last gave blood 25 years ago, to my shame. A friend of mine did it yesterday and, seeing as Iím working from home, thought it was the perfect opportunity.
Wasnt able to give blood due to having been to Afghanistan in 2009 and 2010. Checking blood for Malaria antibodies. Hopefully the results will come back ok in which case Iíll try again in 2 weeks.
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Old 27th Mar 2020, 13:12
  #22 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Beyond the Blue Horizon
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Toadstool
I also had the same problem but not from Afghan, but Africa and Malaria. I can now start to give blood as the period is only 4 weeks after return from Malarial area (it used to be a lot longer) and due to my travels I always fell into the category of not being able to donate, and I now indeed do so in Germany, where we encourage people in the company to do so also. As I am now in the UK for foreseeable future of this epidemic I have registered to donate here as well, though hopefully they may only get a pint or so before normality returns and I am back in Germany. I would encourage anyone to do so as most companies are more than reasonable about it, and I would think especially so in the current climate. Incidentally when back packing in my much younger days (70,s) I found I could sell it in some 3rd world places, India comes to mind at a reasonable premium, I do not know if that still goes on.
Kind regards
Mr Mac
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Old 27th Mar 2020, 13:28
  #23 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2020
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Originally Posted by M.Mouse View Post
It used to be the case in BA that we were barred from blood donation, something to do with the length of time it was then thought it took for the body to fully recover. In later years the restriction was removed.
Just as a matter of curiosity, didn't overseas travel to certain countries play havoc with your ability to donate? Last year I had a 2 week holiday in the Dominican Republic and as a result was embargoed from donating for 4 months. I would have thought an airline pilot regularly flying long haul routes would fall foul of so many embargoes that donating would be impractical.
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Old 27th Mar 2020, 16:17
  #24 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
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Originally Posted by Bull at a Gate View Post
Here in Australia you can’t donate if you lived in the UK for more than 6 months in the mad cow years. So my blood is not wanted anymore. But this thread has got me wondering - you who have always lived in the UK can donate there, so are there any cases of someone getting mad cow disease from a blood transfusion?
Same in Germany, I used to donate my A- in the UK and when we moved to Germany in 1983 I continued, some time around 1990 they decided they didn't want mine anymore.

My mother had unusual blood, AB-.
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Old 27th Mar 2020, 16:54
  #25 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: UK
Age: 65
Posts: 53
I live in UK but can't donate, though previously I donated every 6 months. In 1980 I received a not inconsiderable transfusion, sadly in the days before any testing for CJD, and that now disqualifies me.
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Old 27th Mar 2020, 18:46
  #26 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Southampton
Posts: 774
Hmm. I used to give blood regularly when they had sessions at the workplace. You were given a time and turned up to be seen almost straight away. Simple.

Then they stopped coming to workplaces.

So I looked for a local centre. Given a time and arrived to a big queue of people. "Come back in and hour" they said. I still had to wait when I returned.

I did that a couple of times, same problem. Then the last time, I waited again, only to be told that they didn't want my blood because apparently I hadn't eaten enough. "Have you had some pasta?" they asked.

I said I've eaten what I normally eat, the same as all my other donations.

"Sorry" they said.

I haven't been back since.
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Old 27th Mar 2020, 19:02
  #27 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: 5Y
Posts: 569
There are new methods of killing all bugs (except prions, so no protection against mad cow) in donated blood without damaging the red cells. They are routinely used in many places, but not all.

This is the system I'm familiar with.
https://www.terumobct.com/mirasol
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Old 27th Mar 2020, 23:10
  #28 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: the dark side
Posts: 269
I first gave blood around 50 years ago whilst working at a large truck factory. In those days it was no problem persuading the shopfloor lads to lie on a bed for half an hour instead of standing on the production line so whilst the works canteen was transformed into a temporary ward with dozens of beds, hundreds of donations were taken over a couple of days. I don't remember any details being taken, apart from basics such as name,address and date of birth.
Now when I go to donate I have to fill in my life history which takes almost as long as the blood donation. There are only a handful of reclining chairs whereas at one time beds were in pairs with a chance of having an attractive female in the next bed! Bookings have to be made online and last time I tried to make a booking, the next three sessions at my local venue were already booked up. I am sure the number of donations taken now is a fraction of those taken back in the 60s and 70s. At least you don't have the scary surgeon in the green gown putting the needle in these days!
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Old 28th Mar 2020, 09:54
  #29 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 23
I donated for years. Got the account and booked on-line when that was required. Then, one recent day, I took (unpaid) time off work to go to a booked session - to find it had been cancelled. No call, email or anything. I rang and was told 'these things happen'. No apology, no explanation, no acceptance that they should have contacted me.

Should I keep donating?

FW
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Old 28th Mar 2020, 10:07
  #30 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: bkk
Posts: 92
Check with your blood center if they need plasma. A very useful product and you can donate every fortnight as the machine pumps the red cells back into your body.
They can still use it if you've recently been in a malarial area as they "fractionate" it (don't ask for an explanation, I can't give one) for the first 4 months after you've been in the area.
Takes about 50 - 60 minutes.
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Old 28th Mar 2020, 10:59
  #31 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
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I don't know how it works for self-employed workers, but as an employee of a company in Italy by law I get a paid day off when I donate blood. The company receives a compensation for my paid hours of that day from the national institute for social security.
Moreover, I can ask for a complete blood analysis report once per year.
At the local blood bank, they are transitioning from the previous free-access system to a pre-booked (phone call to the regional health call centre) donation system, so both options are still available. With a pre-booking, there is basically no waiting as you progress in the screening process (paramedic for instant blood test and then an interview with a doctor). Anyway, that day I get paid just for donating blood, so I would not complain about waiting in any case...
Under these conditions, not many excuses not to donate, if you can.
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Old 28th Mar 2020, 11:01
  #32 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: England - Now
Posts: 65
I used to donate whole blood 2 or 3 times per year which didn't take very long but I now donate blood platelets, look them up on the web to see how vital these donations are, and they also take a small amount of plasma.
The difference with platelets is that unlike whole blood or plasma they can not be stored and they only last a week so they need a continuous supply of donors. Unfortunately for many potential donors the actual platelet donation takes around 50 mins plus the 15 mins or so beforehand filling in the questionnaire and setting up. Finally a few minutes for cup of tea and biccies afterwards of course.
This kind of donation can not be done in the mobile whole blood transfusion unit but can only be done in a hospital blood donation unit. This is because the donation is given to very seriously ill people. The procedure and the equipment used looks to my untrained eye very similar to dialysis in that they stick a needle into you, a small amount of blood is taken out, spun around in the machine, platelets extracted and your blood is pumped back into you. Probably one cycle every 60 secs or so.
You can do this every 4 weeks if you wish. Obviously companies are quite willing to let workers take 30 mins out of their day to visit the mobile transfusion unit when it is either at the factory or nearby however in most cases platelet donation would probably mean an afternoon off.

I would urge everyone to donate either blood or platelets or plasma. I personally have never had any problems with appointments either getting one or c*ck ups by their admin staff.

Finally I was told by the staff that the reason aircrew should not donate is due to the loss of red cells. The actual blood volume recovers very quickly but your red cell count will be low for a while. In very simplistic terms we fly with our cabins a few thousand feet above sea level so the oxygen concentration is low which combined with a low red cell count would cause a small amount of oxygen starvation.
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Old 28th Mar 2020, 11:19
  #33 (permalink)  

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Finally I was told by the staff that the reason aircrew should not donate is due to the loss of red cells. The actual blood volume recovers very quickly but your red cell count will be low for a while. In very simplistic terms we fly with our cabins a few thousand feet above sea level so the oxygen concentration is low which combined with a low red cell count would cause a small amount of oxygen starvation.
That's the reason that was quoted to the military (RAF) many years ago when I was one! Fewer red cells made one more susceptible to hypoxia - makes sense. As I recall, the rule was only to give in an emergency, and if you had to, you were grounded for two weeks.
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Old 2nd Apr 2020, 14:25
  #34 (permalink)  
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Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Too close to Croydon for comfort
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Originally Posted by treadigraph View Post
Not had a response to my registration yet - may be due to an surge in applications.
Just had a response to say they have had an unprecedented level of on line application and will be in touch again in the next few days...
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Old 2nd Apr 2020, 14:54
  #35 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Richard Burtonville, South Wales.
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Originally Posted by teeteringhead View Post
That's the reason that was quoted to the military (RAF) many years ago when I was one! Fewer red cells made one more susceptible to hypoxia - makes sense. As I recall, the rule was only to give in an emergency, and if you had to, you were grounded for two weeks.
Interesting... I thought it was to do with blood loss from nosebleeds if we went above 250'.

CG

I also seem to remember that very rare groups were allowed to donate?
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Old 2nd Apr 2020, 16:36
  #36 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Beyond the Blue Horizon
Age: 61
Posts: 905
Treadigraph
Just got the same e-mail as well re Blood Donations, also one saying NHS was oversubscribed as well for volunteers, but they will come back to me if the situation changes. I have no medical training apart from that given by the army, and my basic first aid training which we undertake as a company, so no great loss, but I thought I would volunteer after a discussion with Mrs Mac. She was not too impressed with my altruism, but I pointed out that my father (were he still alive) would have volunteered, as indeed he had done in 1942 for RAF air crew when in a reserved occupation, and I, as his son feel the same pull to try and do the right thing, and besides nobody is shooting at the NHS !. I will see if I get called up in the next draft

Kind regards
Mr Mac
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Old 20th Sep 2021, 22:25
  #37 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2000
Location: SE England
Posts: 653
I was looking for current rules in the UK for time between donation and licence use. It appears that there are none! AIC PINK 97/2004 is no longer current and my best googling didn't turn out anything useful.

RA 3203 – Controller Medical Requirements (publishing.service.gov.uk) gives rules for civilian ATCOs contracted to the MOD, but there doesn't seem to be anything for the rest of us - unless the collective wisdom of PPRuNe knows better?
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Old 20th Sep 2021, 22:40
  #38 (permalink)  
See and avoid
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: USA
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Originally Posted by Bull at a Gate View Post
Here in Australia you can’t donate if you lived in the UK for more than 6 months in the mad cow years. So my blood is not wanted anymore.
That was true in the US too, at least for a while. I wonder if that has changed…
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Old 21st Sep 2021, 06:28
  #39 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Lancashire
Posts: 1,218
Still can't donate blood in the US if you've lived in the UK.

I managed 9 donations before getting a load delivered back to me following an accident. I also had cadaver bone added to me so I'm banned from donating ever again. Not sure I understand why that is.
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Old 21st Sep 2021, 08:08
  #40 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Search me - I only just got out of bed ....
Age: 76
Posts: 497
I was a donor for a very long time - got to over 50 donations. There was a point where my age became an issue, and I had to get a certificate from my doc to continue. However when I was diagnosed with prostate cancer it all came to an end - understandably of course. Enough time has passed for me to re-apply, but all things considered I won't be doing so. The PSA numbers are on the up again, and irrespective of that, my age probably almost certainly would prevent me from doing so now. It was becoming more challenging during the last years anyway. The questions were getting more and more complex, and I felt increasingly like a milking cow during the process. No attempt at conversation of any sort - we'll ask the questions thank you - you provide the answers - nothing more than that. That's probably the way of the world in the city these days, but not for this country bloke. Like so many other adventures in my previous years, it's all in the past now. Happily there are still other avenues for me to serve my community ...
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