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WASPI women

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WASPI women

Old 27th Nov 2019, 09:58
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WASPI women

Is it just me but I can't work out the maths that apparently compensating some women born in the 1950's for the pension age being raised amounts to 58 BILLION? The top amount appears to be 31,000 but divide that into 58,000,000,000 suggest a huge number of women!!!
I don't doubt that there might be some "unfairness" but if women want equality, then working till 65 (or men only until 60) means equality works against you in certain circumstances.
What would the financial cost be if retirement for men had been REDUCED to 60?

If women were working past the age of 60, then surely they were also earning MORE than a retirement pension would have been paid to them..... should we therefore be asking for that excess income to be repaid? Perhaps that would provide a tad more than 58 billion?

From my perspective, I had a fairly challenging job in the City and one day simply burnt out. Doctors prescribed a less stressful job but at 59 every job I went to that was not in the industry I had spent my entire career in, said I was overqualified.... which ought to have been an advantage, surely, someone ready to step up if necessary? There was also the very apparent reluctance to employ a 59 year old as against a s 20 year old for some of the less, shall we say ";less demanding" jobs. I took me a long while to understand he stress implications and perhaps if I had understood it sooner, i could have applied for compensashun for ageism.. I did want the self respect of earning a good salary, car etc and paying my way instead of relying on my wife's income.
There again, she was penalised as a woman, doing far more (and producing much more income) than younger male employees yet on a much lower grade and salary level. She was also unceremoniously dumped as soon as she reached 60 even though she wanted to continue working and was still gaining new business income streams. She herself went into depression after being turfed out feeling low self esteem,which took her a long while to recover from.

But that aside, I can't see what the real problem is for women working (and earning) past 60, nor the huge cost this seems to warrant.
The NHS needs the money more, nurses instead of faceless managers who simply arrange meetings with one another, rather than better care for patients

Steps down from soapbox
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Old 27th Nov 2019, 10:32
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Someone has calculated that Theresa May will receive just under 22,000 under Corbyn's scheme. I wonder if she will be voting Labour!

Anyway I thought this was a waspy

https://www.google.com/search?q=wasp...ACUE8NU6r78-M:
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Old 27th Nov 2019, 12:11
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Originally Posted by Icare9 View Post
every job I went to that was not in the industry I had spent my entire career in, said I was overqualified.... which ought to have been an advantage, surely,
Ah! "overqualified". That delightful catch-all phrase that translates quite easily to any combination of the following likely characteristics: opinionated, awkward, difficult to train, difficult to manage, superior, all-knowing, wanting to change everything, wanting to show how it has been done wrong for years, proud, etc.

And usually said in a way that allows the recipient to feel flattered, to sweeten an otherwise rather bitter pill to swallow.
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Old 27th Nov 2019, 12:20
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Wife his in this category. Went from 60 to 66/67 in short order. The rate at which it receded was most brutal for that age band. Something like that. I keep off the subject as I was one of the last at 65.
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Old 27th Nov 2019, 12:27
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Originally Posted by Mr Optimistic View Post
Wife his in this category. Went from 60 to 66/67 in short order. The rate at which it receded was most brutal for that age band. Something like that. I keep off the subject as I was one of the last at 65.
Same here. Wife was a nurse, had all her pension planning sorted based on her retirement age being 60. She's not now going to get her state pension until she's 66. Brutal is the only way to describe it, as public sector workers, like nurses, didn't have the option to increase their pension contributions to make up for the 6 year gap. It's down to me to make up the shortfall out of my pension for 6 years.
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Old 27th Nov 2019, 12:30
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Equality comes (or should come) with the complete package...
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Old 27th Nov 2019, 12:44
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Funny, all those years women have been fighting for equality of this, equality of that, and above all equality at work. Now they get it they don't want it. As for 'short notice', we have known for many years that the retirement age for women (and then both sexes) is increasing.
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Old 27th Nov 2019, 12:49
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If women were working past the age of 60, then surely they were also earning MORE than a retirement pension would have been paid to them..... should we therefore be asking for that excess income to be repaid? Perhaps that would provide a tad more than 58 billion?
It is. I was working past my retirement age. Yes, I was earning more than retirement pension. Yes, my excess income was repaid in the form of 40% income tax. At least I was not then paying NI.
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Old 27th Nov 2019, 12:53
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Knowing the retirement age was increasing is one thing; delivering the change at a virtual moment's notice is another. It should have been phased in over a number of years, increasing perhaps to 61 then, a couple of years later, increasing to 63 or something along those lines. My next door neighbour was on the verge of retiring when she was told "oh no, you're not!"
And as for the moaning about paying out all this money, the government have "saved" that amount by refusing to pay the pensions. So perhaps it is time to pay it back?
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Old 27th Nov 2019, 14:06
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Showing my ignorance,but what is a WASPI ?
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Old 27th Nov 2019, 14:30
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Women Against State Pension Inequality

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Women_...ion_Inequality
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Old 27th Nov 2019, 14:31
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Oddly, I realise I don't know what it means even though I know what it means, if you know what I mean. Women something state pension something I suppose. Good game.
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Old 27th Nov 2019, 14:36
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Originally Posted by spitfirek5054 View Post
Showing my ignorance,but what is a WASPI ?
It stands for "Women Against State Pension Inequality", which is a bit of an oxymoron since they are whining about being given equality
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Old 27th Nov 2019, 14:41
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Originally Posted by MFC_Fly View Post
It stands for "Women Against State Pension Inequality", which is a bit of an oxymoron since they are whining about being given equality
Not really true. The problem is the way the step changes were implemented. Late in life, when many had little opportunity to change any other pension plans they may have had, they found that they faced a step change in pension age from 60 to 66 or 67. Men only faced a step change from 65 to 66 or 67.
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Old 27th Nov 2019, 14:50
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They may just have to keep working beyond 60, like men have always had to do.
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Old 27th Nov 2019, 15:06
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So surely men could now go to the government and ask for their pensions to be adjusted to the age of 60 as womens previously were amd gain an extra 5 years of back pension?
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Old 27th Nov 2019, 15:21
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Do not think it works like that.
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Old 27th Nov 2019, 15:31
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Originally Posted by NutLoose View Post
So surely men could now go to the government and ask for their pensions to be adjusted to the age of 60 as womens previously were amd gain an extra 5 years of back pension?
That's what started it all. Some bloke who was jealous that women could retire at 60 whilst men had to wait an extra 5 years took HMG to court and won his case for the retirement age to be equalised. IIRC he was cock a hoop at the outcome, not for a moment thinking they would level it up!
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Old 27th Nov 2019, 15:53
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I wondered why the retirement ages were ever different between men and women. Came to the conclusion that back in the day husbands must have been typically 5 years older than their wives, so the ages were set to allow them to retire at the same time. Well, it's a theory.
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Old 27th Nov 2019, 16:18
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Originally Posted by Mr Optimistic View Post
I wondered why the retirement ages were ever different between men and women. Came to the conclusion that back in the day husbands must have been typically 5 years older than their wives, so the ages were set to allow them to retire at the same time. Well, it's a theory.
In the Civil Service, women had a retirement age of 55, men 60, for many years. There's no set retirement age now, I believe. The state pension retirement age difference seemed to follow the same principle, which makes sense as the same government probably set both sets of ages.
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