Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > PPRuNe Social > Jet Blast
Reload this Page >

Stethoscope Use

Jet Blast Topics that don't fit the other forums. Rules of Engagement apply.

Stethoscope Use

Old 11th Nov 2019, 12:30
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: overseas
Age: 73
Posts: 85
Stethoscope Use

I have been back in the UK for nearly a year, my wife and I have seen several GPs, but not once have they used a stethoscope. Odd I thought bearing in mind our age and several visits have been for cardiac reasons.

Are they now obsolete in the UK?

In contrast, my GP in France used one every visit.

bedsted is offline  
Old 11th Nov 2019, 12:54
  #2 (permalink)  
Thought police antagonist
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Where I always have been...firmly in the real world
Posts: 930
Nope, had one used back in January when I had a chest infection.

Also once featured in an ad by "Swissair " showing an engineer using one on a ( not running I hasten to add ) engine. The title was "Doktor ".......which, being an engineer, I thought was a nice compliment .
Krystal n chips is online now  
Old 11th Nov 2019, 13:29
  #3 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: uk
Age: 62
Posts: 55
My French Doctor uses a screwdriver to his ear... his diagnostic was once..... You have a "screw loose" .... Sounds about right!!!....
alicopter is offline  
Old 11th Nov 2019, 13:32
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Florida
Posts: 5,174
Used by most doctors each visit to listen to your lung lobes for gurgle of fluid through your back while you cough. Many cardiac doctors now prefer the electronic method to track your heart beatings.

For mechanical things I prefer to use a wooden stick between my ear and the machine. Always spectacular if the machine happens to fail at the same time!
lomapaseo is offline  
Old 11th Nov 2019, 13:33
  #5 (permalink)  
Gnome de PPRuNe
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Too close to Croydon for comfort
Age: 55
Posts: 5,915
I also had my chest listened to by a stethoscope wielding nurse practitioner for a recurring persistent cough several years ago - a chest infection needing antibiotics. My doctors tend to gauge my weight by eye and diagnose the need for blood pressure testing - and try not to look too disappointed that it's usually normal.
treadigraph is online now  
Old 11th Nov 2019, 16:49
  #6 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: uk
Posts: 66
Although she has no connection with the medical profession, my wife is quite knowledgeable on medical matters so one birhday a few years ago, I gave her a pukka stethoscope. Sadly, I don't thnk it has ever been used ... yet another successful gift idea!
axefurabz is offline  
Old 11th Nov 2019, 16:53
  #7 (permalink)  
I don't own this space under my name. I should have leased it while I still could
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Lincolnshire
Age: 76
Posts: 16,613
Originally Posted by axefurabz View Post
Although she has no connection with the medical profession, my wife is quite knowledgeable on medical matters so one birhday a few years ago, I gave her a pukka stethoscope. Sadly, I don't thnk it has ever been used ... yet another successful gift idea!
keep it in the garage.

Mrs PN still has hers, never used it since she retured.
Pontius Navigator is offline  
Old 11th Nov 2019, 17:47
  #8 (permalink)  

Plastic PPRuNer
 
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 1,884
The stethoscope is a wonderful diagnostic instrument provided that you are trained to understand the breath sounds, wheezes and gurgles and whatnot that you hear.

Most young doctors today are not and cannot, which is a great pity for them if they are interested in patients and diagnostic skills.
Unfortunately most of them are not, being more interested in practice management and avoiding their litigious patients.

The amount of diagnosis that can be made by the trained ear by this simple instrument is astonishing when demonstrated - abdomens, chests (and yes OBG, fetuses) cry out to you the answer with their rumbles and tumbles.

Alas, today these skills have been mostly lost and what the stethoscope can reveal in a country cottage, must now be made by millionGBP CAT/MRI, cardiac catheters and multicolored ultrasounds.

They are mostly worn now as a "badge-of-office" - ask them if they can diagnose the characteristic sound of mitral regurgitation with it's third heart sound gallop in diastole and they will gape at you like sheep. "But I'd send the patient for a U/S!", they bleat.

There are no U/S machines (or CT scanners for that matter) in a humble abode in the Bush or a fifth floor council flat.

stethoscope carrying Mac



Mac the Knife is online now  
Old 11th Nov 2019, 18:17
  #9 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: West Wiltshire, UK
Age: 67
Posts: 369
Originally Posted by Mac the Knife View Post
The stethoscope is a wonderful diagnostic instrument provided that you are trained to understand the breath sounds, wheezes and gurgles and whatnot that you hear.

Most young doctors today are not and cannot, which is a great pity for them if they are interested in patients and diagnostic skills.
Unfortunately most of them are not, being more interested in practice management and avoiding their litigious patients.

The amount of diagnosis that can be made by the trained ear by this simple instrument is astonishing when demonstrated - abdomens, chests (and yes OBG, fetuses) cry out to you the answer with their rumbles and tumbles.

Alas, today these skills have been mostly lost and what the stethoscope can reveal in a country cottage, must now be made by millionGBP CAT/MRI, cardiac catheters and multicolored ultrasounds.

They are mostly worn now as a "badge-of-office" - ask them if they can diagnose the characteristic sound of mitral regurgitation with it's third heart sound gallop in diastole and they will gape at you like sheep. "But I'd send the patient for a U/S!", they bleat.

There are no U/S machines (or CT scanners for that matter) in a humble abode in the Bush or a fifth floor council flat.

stethoscope carrying Mac
Interesting, I had no idea it was such a versatile instrument.

Makes me wonder why someone hasn't produced an app that can do all that. Just hold the 'phone in the right place and it tells you what's wrong...
VP959 is online now  
Old 11th Nov 2019, 19:05
  #10 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Brisbane
Posts: 201
Originally Posted by VP959 View Post
Interesting, I had no idea it was such a versatile instrument.

Makes me wonder why someone hasn't produced an app that can do all that. Just hold the 'phone in the right place and it tells you what's wrong...
It has been done already...

http://www.peterjbentley.com/istethoscopepro.html
james ozzie is offline  
Old 11th Nov 2019, 21:01
  #11 (permalink)  

Avoid imitations
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Wandering the FIR and cyberspace often at highly unsociable times
Posts: 12,316
I have a mechanics' stethoscope and use it to pinpoint where engine noises are coming from. Very useful bit of kit. My AME also uses a medical stethoscope (he's a bit of a petrol head so I hope he wipes it first).
ShyTorque is offline  
Old 11th Nov 2019, 21:51
  #12 (permalink)  
See and avoid
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 487
I agree that doctors are no longe trained to use them.

As to whether they spend enough time with each patient using a stethoscope or a similar device to adequately diagnose common problems in a timely manner is a separate question.
visibility3miles is offline  
Old 11th Nov 2019, 22:32
  #13 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Out in the sticks in DE56
Age: 81
Posts: 543
Was on a respiratory ward for a few days last week. Stethascope used by someone every day. Reassured to hear them report - no wheezes, no rattles, after the day of admission.

I used to have one of 'em back in the day: useful for listening to engines of sundry cars. Lost it somewhere along the line... suspect 'borrowed' by no. 1 son whilst fancy-dressing. Discovered that a stick on engine block with other end applied to skull worked really rather better!
jimtherev is offline  
Old 11th Nov 2019, 23:46
  #14 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: CYYC (Calgary)
Posts: 5,104
I thought this thread was going to be about using large screwdrivers as stethoscopes to listen to engines.

I see it has been mentioned, but I was very impressed when I was shown this trick and I’ve used it many times since.

in Stanley Hooker’s autobiography “Not Much of an Engineer”, he mentions engine-testers using screwdrivers to listen to Merlins running at full chat. No hearing protection of course!

India Four Two is offline  
Old 12th Nov 2019, 00:17
  #15 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: uk
Age: 62
Posts: 55
The screwdriver, as I mentioned earlier in my delirium above, used as a stethoscope I have used thousands of times... You can hear rod saddles, bearings, valves, pumps impellers, crankshafts, piston rings etc.... with great precision. (with someone at the flywheel or crancking or even engine running) In my trade, as a shipwright, sounds are of great help to sound the wooden hulls or members. In my Marine Surveyor's tools box, hammer, malet and srewdriver, as well as an Opinel pocket knife are my most useful tools...... (or were as I am now retired...). On the medical side, as a young boy, I was always surprised when the familly doctor was using his own bloody ear, without a stethoscope!!! to listen to my chest and my back... Funny how he was also always fondling my balls (to check for testicular cancer I suppose?!!!) I think he did not quite make it to retirement as a Doctor if my memory serves me right... I guess in the Sixties it was common practice?

Last edited by alicopter; 12th Nov 2019 at 01:02.
alicopter is offline  
Old 12th Nov 2019, 04:48
  #16 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: America's 51st State
Posts: 189
Stethoscopes are normally only used by doctors in this country when being photographed for a magazine, newspaper or TV...
VH-MLE is online now  
Old 12th Nov 2019, 05:57
  #17 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: NV
Age: 71
Posts: 147
See my doc 4x per year.

PA checks weight, BP and using the finger clamp checks pulse and O2 level.

Doc, every time, uses the scope on chest and back. Checks the glands in the neck. Checks the ears with the light. Does the tongue out and say ah.

Once a year he does a DRE and occult blood test. And checks the meat and 2 veg (cough, cough). Once a year 6 months after DRE he includes PSA test in the blood test.
IBMJunkman is offline  
Old 12th Nov 2019, 10:12
  #18 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Fliegensville, Gold Coast Australia
Posts: 35
During some prolonged treatment at the Royal Brisbane & Womens Hospital recently, would see me traversing various large courtyards linking various medical facilities at various times of the day. Invariably young (I mean young!) doctor types were present wearing Stethoscopes out in the courtyards...not sure what for other than to signal to everyone they were a medical student?? Mac the Knifes diagnoses via a stehoscope is impressive, sure none of the young steho wearing 'kids' could do that !!
Fliegenmong is offline  
Old 12th Nov 2019, 10:36
  #19 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: The Twain
Posts: 83
Mrs Anxiao uses one daily at her work - as a veterinarian.

One of the challenges of animal health is that you do not usually get a good reply to the question, "where does it hurt?". The owner is usually not too sure either. So the basics of working up a case involves using any kind of diagnostics that may help to clarify the pathology. She tells me that her stethoscope training went on for weeks, and was reinforced daily throughout her six years degree. She tried to demonstrate and teach me a minor abnormality in our dog with it, and all I heard was a flub-dub. She could hear an orchestral symphony from the heart.

So it is still very valid in health diagnostics. But as I discovered it is a highly skilled ability.
anxiao is offline  
Old 12th Nov 2019, 11:02
  #20 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: South of France
Posts: 1,035
In contrast, my GP in France used one every visit.
Yep, mine too but it seems to just be part of the process necessary before he prescribes yet another bucketful of pills....and I'm not even ill! If ever anyone is taken poorly in France, just knock on the nearest door. Every household has enough drugs to perform minor surgery.
strake is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.