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Yikes! That was close....

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Yikes! That was close....

Old 7th Nov 2019, 13:32
  #41 (permalink)  
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Did you find the document? I gotta know...
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Old 7th Nov 2019, 13:54
  #42 (permalink)  
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FullOppositeRudder

It didn't worry me all that much at the time. I was young and carefree, and risks were a part of life. However, at the other end of my life span - whatever that may be (74+ and still counting) - I look back on it with a slightly more jaundiced and potentially emotional perspective. I can't quite explain these emotions other than to say that I am very grateful for all that life has given me, and I came so very close (along with the instructor) on missing out on all of this. I guess I'm just more reflective about everything these days; part of the aging process perhaps.


You have hit the nail on the head, that is why I started the thread, we all shrugged our shoulders, ( well those of us who were not actually injured in the incident Russell Gulch), and carried on. It is only in later life you sometimes think.. what if?

Recidivist
I was working on the transceiver of an old Decca radar. went to measure voltage behind the HT line, hairs on the back of my hand stood up and I instinctively pulled back. I woke on the far side of the wheelhouse with a very sore arm

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Old 7th Nov 2019, 14:17
  #43 (permalink)  
 
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Engineering on the early morning Paris departure dragging a set of steps around checking external doors.... windy day & an unlatched baggage container came towards me spewing cases as it came ..... luckily steps took brunt of impact & I woke up flat on my back on a cold wet apron.... luckily just a few bruises!!
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Old 7th Nov 2019, 14:49
  #44 (permalink)  
 
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Jaguars, FLMs and doors, seems to be a theme.

I was seeing off a Jag with a FLM on 20 sqn, I had just checked the door on the weapons panel in the nose wheel bay was closed after engine start, and was ducking down to get out of the way when the doors shut above me removing my ear defenders. The FLM had removed the ground power cable and closed the door, which moved the nose wheel door switch to closed.

At Lossiemouth we had a detachment of Norwegian F-5 aircraft for "Exercise Speyside Distilleries". The F-5 had a switch in the main wheel bay which had to be moved before engine shut down to open the inner gear doors, if you didn't do this you couldn't refuel the thing. I had just ducked underneath the wing when the Cpl marshalled the a/c forward, I just managed to get out of the way of the main wheel.

FullOppositeRudder No wonder you chose that as your nom-de-plume!
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Old 7th Nov 2019, 16:30
  #45 (permalink)  
 
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Remembered another one, although this didn't happen to me but to some of my colleagues. I suspect there were sleepless nights after this one. The story was breathlessly recounted to me shortly thereafter.

I worked in a jet engine refurbishment facility. It had a test cell for the engines after completion. Essentially it's a big insulated building with a platform onto which the engine was rolled then raised level with the control room and hooked up to the overhead. The platform is lowered and the test begins.
On this day there was a problem and something needed adjusting, trimming I think they called it. Power was reduced to idle and the platform was raised complete with mechanics who set to work either side of what I think was a P&W JT8D. Keeping well away from the intake or exhaust, luckily

At some point there was a power cut. Total darkness but worse the engine went to uncontrollable full take off power for some reason.

So imagine total darkness and a screaming jet engine right beside you. It's nightmarish. Two guys on the control room side found the door and escaped that way. But the Mechanic on the other side jumped off the platform, 'into the void' as he put it. About ten feet.

No one was injured. But you can easily imagine what might have been. It was a narrow escape for all concerned.

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Old 7th Nov 2019, 16:43
  #46 (permalink)  
 
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Old 7th Nov 2019, 18:31
  #47 (permalink)  
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Here's something kind-of work-related: back in 1997 I was working in Reading, and on one Friday I'd booked a half day and planned to get the train back to London. I left slightly later than planned, missed one Intercity train by a few minutes ... the train that crashed at Southall.
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Old 7th Nov 2019, 19:11
  #48 (permalink)  
 
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Now that somebody has introduced How-to-Start video reminded me of an Oh-ch**t moment while working inside the inlet of fan engine on a large twin at an off-base. Two of us managed to stand inside the inlet on a hot day as mechanics worked on other stuff on the plane. It seems that the mechanics decided to take a cool down break in the plane with their tea n stuff. Being still hot they decided to start the APU and in the process managed to hit the start switch on the engine we were working in the inlet. The engine then let out a large hiss followed by a low hum and then when the fan began to turn we jumped for our lives among lots of cussing. About this time the guys in the cockpit figured out the wrong switch and closed off the starter air. I knew from past experience with locked fan rotors that the engine would have started and eventually the torque from the low compressor-turbine would have overcome our ability to stick a foot in the fan to keep it from spinning..
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Old 7th Nov 2019, 23:19
  #49 (permalink)  
 
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Ha ha, it seems to me the engine worked perfectly. The mounting on the other hand?
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Old 9th Nov 2019, 14:55
  #50 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by bnt View Post
Here's something kind-of work-related: back in 1997 I was working in Reading, and on one Friday I'd booked a half day and planned to get the train back to London. I left slightly later than planned, missed one Intercity train by a few minutes ... the train that crashed at Southall.
Vaguely related to the above ...

1980 (I think) a friend and I went back-packing around Europe by InterRail. We were in Rome, and were going to catch the train back overnight to Germany, via a train-change at Milan and another in Basle. I do remember that we had to wait for nearly an hour on the station at Milan for our connecting train; eventually it arrived and we set-off heading north. On to Basle and change trains at some ungodly hour, and then up to Frankfurt. We spend the next few days travelling up and down Germany. We were completely cut-off from any news, media, or any info outside our travels. I think that it was only on Wednesday that we discovered there'd been a terrorist bomb detonation on the Saturday evening, about 1 hour after we'd left.
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Old 9th Nov 2019, 15:54
  #51 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Geezers of Nazareth View Post
Vaguely related to the above ...

1980 (I think) a friend and I went back-packing around Europe by InterRail. We were in Rome, and were going to catch the train back overnight to Germany, via a train-change at Milan and another in Basle. I do remember that we had to wait for nearly an hour on the station at Milan for our connecting train; eventually it arrived and we set-off heading north. On to Basle and change trains at some ungodly hour, and then up to Frankfurt. We spend the next few days travelling up and down Germany. We were completely cut-off from any news, media, or any info outside our travels. I think that it was only on Wednesday that we discovered there'd been a terrorist bomb detonation on the Saturday evening, about 1 hour after we'd left.
In 1973 my then girlfriend was training to be a nurse at University College Hospital, London. I got the train in to Euston to see her on a day off, and she met me at the station, around lunchtime. We had lunch at the station, and about 3 or 4 minutes after we'd left, the place where we'd been was blown up by the IRA. We heard what we later found out had been the blast, but had no idea of what had happened until the next day, when I heard about it on the news.
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Old 9th Nov 2019, 18:49
  #52 (permalink)  
 
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That tickled my memory, in 1994 I was visiting my mother in Chichester and needed to top up the oil in my car, I nipped to Halfords in Bognor as they were closing and went on my way, less than half an hour later an IRA bicycle bomb with 2.5 lbs of semtex exploded outside of Woolworths on the opposite side of the road.
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Old 10th Nov 2019, 09:47
  #53 (permalink)  
 
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It was bad enough when the IRA were active against Australian tourists and BP petrol stations etc where I lived. I was once stopped crossing the border from the Netherlands to Germany by two border police carrying sub machine guns in addition to their pistols, and fifty metres down the road another one with a machine gun on a bipod.

Steepclimb, I don't envy you that stress one bit.
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Old 10th Nov 2019, 21:05
  #54 (permalink)  
 
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OK not work related. But from my biker days. Let's be clear I was a brain off, I'll live forever biker. Strangely the opposite as a pilot.

Anyway Granny who I hardly knew died. The family, Dad went by train. I wasn't speaking to Dad so decided to go myself by motorcycle.

I wasn't a slow biker. I was a hooligan. I was fast. It was a wet day. Roads then were not so consistent. Tar would leak to the surface and produce a smooth surface.

I hit a smooth patch and felt a loss of traction on the rear wheel. Made me nervous. I didn't slow down though. Then both wheels hit a smooth patch. I was out of control. I confess I screamed. Then I regained traction.

I slowed then, for a while with the confidence of youth.

I'm still alive but I have no idea why because I really pushed the limits.
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Old 11th Nov 2019, 00:26
  #55 (permalink)  
 
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LOL motorbikes

My large heavy moto at high speed with me aboard racing, completely snapped into 2 pieces one day; sort of flying I suppose; fun fun fun.....
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Old 11th Nov 2019, 03:51
  #56 (permalink)  
 
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After a twenty nine year lay off I saw an ad in the paper that a local flying school was giving lessons in Pemberton. I found out I needed five hours and a flight test (and the PStar) to get a Rec. Permit. After six or seven hours I was free to go on my own so I rented the Cessna 150 (odd) and flew down the valley and back to remember what solo was like.

The next evening I was watching the news when there was an item about an aircraft that had an EFATO. Two guys had rented it and when the police arrived they found it contained a huge bag of Mary Jane and a sawn off shotgun. As the camera panned across the tail I saw it was the aircraft I had flown the day before. Broken con rod. Could have happened any time.
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Old 11th Nov 2019, 14:27
  #57 (permalink)  
 
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In 1979 I was working as the assistant site manger, building a restaurant in Winsor Safari Park. One morning the dumper would not start, so we got the JCB to come over to jump start it, it was a big dumper, not a little one with a wind up Petter engine. So the site manger is holding the jump leads on the JCB battery and I'm holding the jump leads on the dumper battery. The dumper driver hits the starter button where upon there is a bit of bang and bits of the dumper battery went whizzing past my head. Needless to say, I staggered backwards as it went off still holding the ends of the jump leads. Once I had regained my composure and realised I was completely uninjured, I returned to the dumper to see what had happened. There was not a lot left of the battery, just the lead plates sitting on the base, the rest having been blown into the pieces that had whizzed pass my head. I wondered why I had not been covered in acid and came to the conclusion that there wasn't any in it in the first place and that the battery was just full of hydrogen, just waiting for a spark to set it off.
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Old 11th Nov 2019, 18:11
  #58 (permalink)  
 
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Back on the days lead acid batteries had little screw tops on each cell to top them up i had a friend with some minor scars on his face. He advised that one did not lean over a lead acid battery when topping up, especially when smoking.
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Old 12th Nov 2019, 20:56
  #59 (permalink)  
 
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Terrain Terrain pull up, going into FNC
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