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Word outrage

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Word outrage

Old 9th Oct 2019, 05:54
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Word outrage

I was listening to a talk radio station last night to lull me off to sleep and the presenter and many callers were getting their knickers in a mighty twist about word usage, that for me has been in normal use for many years. The words were colloquiums to describe/refer to citizens of other countries. Before I nodded off the main ones were 'Krauts' for the Germans, 'Yanks' for Americans and 'Frogs' for the French. The outraged (UK) callers were referring to said words as "the Y word, the 'K' word etc as though they were expletives of the highest order. Having experienced citizens of other countries both within Europe and further afield referring to, for example, the citizens of the UK as 'Brits', I took zero offence, as it's just a term of general reference towards a country's population. Have we come to a point where even these/this moniker is now so offensive ?
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Old 9th Oct 2019, 06:25
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I regard those callers as the C word, they are probably social workers who can't sleep because they are so outraged.
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Old 9th Oct 2019, 07:10
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Having lived and worked in a place where we were collectively known as "Gweilos" (= white devils or ghosts) it really doesn't bother me too much.
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Old 9th Oct 2019, 07:11
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Old 9th Oct 2019, 07:21
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As a Scot I rather miss the old days when I first settled in England and was referred to as a 'sweaty sock from Josckistan' by my new social circle. Obviously gave as good as I got, but it was fun and a great way to bond.
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Old 9th Oct 2019, 07:31
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I doubt many Brits find "Brit" offensive.."Pom" and certainly "limey" can get a bit wearing (depending on the context)..I think even those who don't work in social services might "Insellaffe" a bit out out of line.

Fundamentally I need to ask the Germans where "Kraut" sits on the offensive sliding scale ..what was the opinion of the German's who contributed to the radio programme?
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Old 9th Oct 2019, 07:41
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Originally Posted by wiggy View Post
...

Fundamentally I need to ask the Germans where "Kraut" sits on the offensive sliding scale ..what was the opinion of the German's who contributed to the radio programme?
True outrage needs to be directed at poor use, or omission, of words.

The German's who who contributed to the radio programme? Was it the German's brother, sister, wife, husband, mother, father, uncle, aunt, etc.?

Also, an ellipsis is three dots. At a push four.
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Old 9th Oct 2019, 07:43
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Originally Posted by wiggy View Post
I doubt many Brits find "Brit" offensive.."Pom" can get a bit wearing (depending on the context)..I think even those who don't work in social services might "Insellaffe" a bit out out of line

Fundamentally I need to ask the Germans where "Kraut" sits on the offensive sliding scale ..what was the opinion of the German's who contributed to the radio programme?
I'm not sure why we need to refer to people from other countries by anything other than their real identity. Do other nations (in other languages) refer to their neighbours and friends(s) by derogatory terms? One I can think of is is the French who allegedly call British "Le Rost Biff". Do Germans have names for Poles, or the Spanish for the Portuguese, or Russians for Ukrainians? I have a feeling it may have something to do with the psyche of nations that used to have empires and a high opinion of themselves.

We British seem to have a long list of derogatory names for foreigners. Without listing the really offensive ones, relating to colour or religion I can think of:-

Spic
Cloggie
Frog
Kraut
Nip / Jap
Yank
Pom
Ruskie
Chink
Wop
Scandiw0g

Personally, I use very few. The one that does slip through is "Nip".
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Old 9th Oct 2019, 07:53
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Originally Posted by wiggy View Post
I doubt many Brits find "Brit" offensive.."Pom" and certainly "limey" can get a bit wearing (depending on the context)..I think even those who don't work in social services might "Insellaffe" a bit out out of line.

Fundamentally I need to ask the Germans where "Kraut" sits on the offensive sliding scale ..what was the opinion of the German's who contributed to the radio programme?
You may call me Kraut, but don’t mention the war .
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Old 9th Oct 2019, 08:08
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Originally Posted by BDAttitude View Post

You may call me Kraut, but don’t mention the war .
........

I'll have to admit that many years ago over a few beers I did once call a German F-104 pilot a "mad Kraut" ...then again given the context..

I'm with ATNotts in that "I'm not sure why we need to refer to people from other countries by anything other than their real identity", and I certainly couldn't imagine anybody with any decency using the term these days in the context of making a political point or stir up anti-German sentiment.
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Old 9th Oct 2019, 08:16
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Originally Posted by ATNotts View Post
...

Personally, I use very few. The one that does slip through is "Nip".
Spike Milligna (the well-known typing error) had a theory that the Japanese cannot stand cold weather, so much so that to avoid it, they would commit suicide by jumping off tall mountains. In really cold weather there were so many at it that at any time there was always at least one on his way down. And, on cold days, that is where the saying comes from: "There's a Nip in the air".
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Old 9th Oct 2019, 08:21
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Wiggy hit the nail on the head, it all depends on the context in which a word is used. Anybody can call me a Clogg or Cloggie I wouldn’t even raise an eyebrow. The world is to easily offended these days.
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Old 9th Oct 2019, 08:25
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Originally Posted by NoelEvans View Post
Spike Milligna (the well-known typing error) had a theory that the Japanese cannot stand cold weather, so much so that to avoid it, they would commit suicide by jumping off tall mountains. In really cold weather there were so many at it that at any time there was always at least one on his way down. And, on cold days, that is where the saying comes from: "There's a Nip in the air".
I doubt he'd get away with cracking that one on mainstream TV in this PC era!
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Old 9th Oct 2019, 08:29
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All those years in Ghana being the 'the abruni' (white man) - I must try to raise some outrage (I'm feeling quite traumatised)
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Old 9th Oct 2019, 08:37
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A neighbour giving a talk at a Rotary Club began "I am a cloggie"

I see from the list above that Noggie is not listed but WOP is.

I think there is a variation with these nicknames depending both on context and how we as a nation think of others. I think we think of Noggies and Cloggies with affection but others with disdain.

I was surprised to see WOP there when WOG, Spic and Dago were not. The W word refers less to someone from a specific country but to a person. Spic and Dago I am not sure who they are, the P and N words are properly omitted.

Then if course we had the notorious Bennies and Stills.
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Old 9th Oct 2019, 08:42
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Spic and Dago I am not sure who they are, the P and N words are properly omitted.
Spic refers to Spanish; dago I always assumed was a generic derogatory terms for anyone of Latin origin, with olive skin - as in "greasy dago" which thankfully is hardly ever heard these days, as it's really no better than the "W", "C" or "N" words.

Who, or what are Bennies and Stills? Never come across either.
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Old 9th Oct 2019, 08:47
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Not too many New Zealanders or or Australians offended by being called Kiwis or Aussies, respectively.
Provided you call it right, of course.

And Canucks and Newfies wear their nicknames with pride.
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Old 9th Oct 2019, 08:56
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I believe that “Bennies”and “Still” originated during the Falklands conflict. Soldiers would refer to The Islanders as “Bennies” due to an implied similarity in interlect to a certain soap opera character. The were told by superiors not to use this description. Thereafter they were called “stills” as in “still Bennies” No offence intended by me to Falkland Islanders.
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Old 9th Oct 2019, 09:01
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Originally Posted by SpringHeeledJack View Post
Having experienced citizens of other countries both within Europe and further afield referring to, for example, the citizens of the UK as 'Brits', I took zero offence, as it's just a term of general reference towards a country's population. Have we come to a point where even these/this moniker is now so offensive ?
”Brit” has absolutely no condescending connotation, no wonder you take zero offence to it.

How about “Rosbif” instead
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Old 9th Oct 2019, 09:07
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I think we Brits also once had the soubriquet "Soap Dodgers" didn't we?
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