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Top 10 most difficult place names (UK)

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Top 10 most difficult place names (UK)

Old 9th Oct 2019, 21:29
  #61 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Atlas Shrugged View Post
I'm surprised that Scunthorpe hasn't been mentioned.....
At one point the Local Authority computers wouldn't let it through an email spell check as it picked out a rude word!
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Old 10th Oct 2019, 04:46
  #62 (permalink)  
 
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Nice story, but no railway has run through the 'Puddles'.
Disagree, pretty sure there was a railway through Puddletown at least, until Beeching closed everything down.

Last edited by YorkshireTyke; 10th Oct 2019 at 05:10.
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Old 10th Oct 2019, 05:03
  #63 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Sky blue and black View Post
Wasn't there an American aircraft who wanted to route direct to Stabbs instead of St Abbs?
And another that reported his position as just East of "Loogabarooga" which turned out to be Loughborough.

My in-laws lived in the North of Scotland on the Moray coast. Their part of the world was spelt "Enzie" but pronounced "Ingy"

And don't get me started on Ecclefechan and Craigelachie
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Old 10th Oct 2019, 06:03
  #64 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by YorkshireTyke View Post
Disagree, pretty sure there was a railway through Puddletown at least, until Beeching closed everything down.
Can't see any rail lines around Puddletown on historic maps. Nearest is the Wareham-Dorchester stretch of line which is still open as part of SW's fiefdom today.

Amused to see a place called Tincleton just south of Puddletown!
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Old 10th Oct 2019, 08:02
  #65 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by YorkshireTyke View Post
Disagree, pretty sure there was a railway through Puddletown at least, until Beeching closed everything down.
Originally Posted by treadigraph View Post
Can't see any rail lines around Puddletown on historic maps. Nearest is the Wareham-Dorchester stretch of line which is still open as part of SW's fiefdom today.
And not quite so near the other way was the Somerset & Dorset in the Stour valley which was closed in the Beeching plan.
I'll also point out that, even if there had been a railway in the Piddle valley, it would not have been on any sensible route to Plymouth from any of Queen Victoria's places of residence.
Pity to wreck a good story, but . . .
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Old 11th Oct 2019, 06:48
  #66 (permalink)  
 
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Pity to wreck a good story, but . . .
Told to me by a longtime resident of Piddletrenthide, and if not true why the clear discrepancy between the Piddles and the Puddles ?
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Old 11th Oct 2019, 07:56
  #67 (permalink)  
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According to that bastion of accuracy, Wikipedia, the Victorian connection may be social mores:

One explanation for the preference of Puddletown over Piddletown is that Major-General Charles William Thompson, who lived at Ilsington Lodge after returning from the Great War, pushed through the puddle variant because piddle had other connotations in army circles.[6] The broadcaster and writer Ralph Wightman (1901–71), a native of the Piddle Valley and one-time Puddletown resident,[6] believed it was due to Victorian "refinement", as he recalled that in his youth elderly aunts referred to Piddletrenthide as just "Trenthide".[5] Roland Gant in Dorset Villages stated more explicitly that the Victorians used puddle because piddle "became a euphemism for 'piss'".[7] The use of Puddletown rather than Piddletown was officially preserved in the late 1950s, when, according to Wightman, "a long County Council debate solemnly decided Piddletown should be Puddletown".
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Old 11th Oct 2019, 08:04
  #68 (permalink)  
 
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Then there were the "Tolpuddle Martyrs" of 1834, three years before Victoria became queen. Is there evidence that they were originally the Tolpiddle Martyrs?
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Old 11th Oct 2019, 08:48
  #69 (permalink)  
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This OS map dated 1896 shows Puddletown - shame there is nothing earlier.
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Old 11th Oct 2019, 11:04
  #70 (permalink)  
 
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how about Hatch Beauchamp near Taunton.
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Old 11th Oct 2019, 12:39
  #71 (permalink)  
 
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I have long understood that piddle derives from an old English word for a stream, i.e. moving water. Water which is not moving forms a puddle. Thus in a valley where there are small lakes linked by a stream, there would be a succession of a puddles linked by a piddle,
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Old 11th Oct 2019, 17:48
  #72 (permalink)  
 
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Quadring Eaudike gets my vote
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Old 12th Oct 2019, 07:50
  #73 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by oxenos View Post
. . . there would be a succession of a puddles linked by a piddle,
Like our road after the dog-walker has passed by.

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Old 12th Oct 2019, 09:07
  #74 (permalink)  
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This is always a contender...........
Machynlleth

Also open to various pronunciations ........Gnosall and Idridgehay.....ostensibly Haile Selassie once spent a night at the latter with one W.Churchill....
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Old 12th Oct 2019, 11:27
  #75 (permalink)  
 
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In E Sussex there is an Upper Dicker and Lower Dicker.
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Old 12th Oct 2019, 20:38
  #76 (permalink)  
 
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best mispronunciation I ever heard was at the start of the Falklands War.
The BBC announcer solemnly intoned that "British aircraft had flown in to Widdy a Wacky airport overnight"
That puzzled I, until I realised they were trying to make Wideawake sound more "exotic"
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Old 13th Oct 2019, 13:41
  #77 (permalink)  
 
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Some Norfolk place names have already been mentioned. Itís easy, just miss out the entire middle bit...
Wymondham becomes Wimdom
Costessey becomes Cossey
Garboldisham becomes Garbleshem... etc.
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Old 14th Oct 2019, 12:39
  #78 (permalink)  
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I drive past Childwickbury on my way home most evenings. A nice little Hamlet - half a dozen houses and no church - with the "Big House" further along where Mrs. Kubrick (widow of Stanley) lives.

Chiddickbree anyone?
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